Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What regex would help satisfy the following situation:

if (string starts with a letter (one or more))
  it must be followed by a . or _ (not both)
else
  no match

Example (imagine i have a list of values to be matched, that are being tested):

public static boolean matches(String k) {

    for (final String key : protectedKeys) {

        final String OPTIONAL_SEPARATOR = "[\\._]?";
        final String OPTIONAL_CHARACTERS = "(?:[a-zA-Z]+)?";
        final String OR = "|";

        final String SEPARATED = OPTIONAL_CHARACTERS + 
                  OPTIONAL_SEPARATOR + key + OPTIONAL_SEPARATOR
                + OPTIONAL_CHARACTERS;

        String pattern = "(" + key + OR + SEPARATED + ")";

        if (k.matches(pattern)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

This code matches all of the below

    System.out.println(matches("usr"));

    System.out.println(matches("_usr"));
    System.out.println(matches("system_usr"));
    System.out.println(matches(".usr"));
    System.out.println(matches("system.usr"));

    System.out.println(matches("usr_"));
    System.out.println(matches("usr_system"));
    System.out.println(matches("usr."));
    System.out.println(matches("usr.system"));

    System.out.println(matches("_usr_"));
    System.out.println(matches("system_usr_production"));
    System.out.println(matches(".usr."));
    System.out.println(matches("system.usr.production"));

But fails on

    System.out.println(matches("weirdusr")); // matches when it should not

Simplified, i'd like to recognize that

        final String a = "(?:[a-zA-Z]+)[\\._]" + key;
        final String b = "^[\\._]?" + key;

When string starts with a character, separator is no longer optional, else, if string starts with the a separator, it is now optional

share|improve this question
3  
+1 for test cases! Why is "usr" a good match, but "weirdusr" is not? Both start with a letter, and both are not followed by "." or "_". –  matt Jun 4 '12 at 21:42
    
usr is a good match because it's a standalone (and is listed in protectedKeys). weirduser is not listed in protectedKeys –  Jam Jun 4 '12 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

To satisfy the mentioned condition, try:

srt.matches("[a-zA-Z]+(\\.[^_]?|_[^\\.]?)[^\\._]*")
share|improve this answer
    
This does not pass all the test cases –  Jam Jun 4 '12 at 22:29
    
In the Sysouts that you mentioned, some cases starts with a dot or a _, hence the condition where a String need to start with a letter don't works... I guess i don't get your point. –  Elias Jun 4 '12 at 22:53

I got this to work as well, if this helps to anyone

    for (final String key : protectedKeys) {

        final String separator = "[\\._]";
        final String textSeparator = "(" + "^(?:[a-zA-Z]+)" + separator + ")";
        final String separatorText = "(?:" + separator + "(?:[a-zA-Z]+)$" + ")";

        final String OR = "|";

        final String azWithSeparator = textSeparator + "?" + key + separatorText + "?";
        final String optionalSeparatorWithoutAZ = separator + "?" + key + separator + "?";

        String pattern = "(" + key + OR + azWithSeparator + OR + optionalSeparatorWithoutAZ + ")";

        if (k.matches(pattern)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Fyi, it would most likely be better to join all the protectedKeys (with |) and use that in a single expression which you execute once, and not as now, for every keyword. –  Qtax Jun 5 '12 at 14:50
if (string starts with a letter (one or more))
  it must be followed by a . or _ (not both)
else
  no match

Can be written with regex as:

^[A-Za-z]+[._]

The regex is made to spec (you do not say anything about what is allowed to follow).

The match will fail per definition if the condition is not met, thus no need for any else alteration with a forced fail (?!).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.