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Imagine an API that returns JSON data for a TV listings app like zap2it TV listings.

It's basically a list of TV channels and for each channel the shows that are on currently and beyond. Currently, I have an API that returns all the channels GET /channels. However, there is a need to add the show currently on for each channel in that data. I am thinking of adding a new API, GET /channels/on_now, to differentiate it from the current API. I want to be clear about this for the new API, I don't want to make individual call for each channel, the show-on-now data needs to be returned for all channels. Is this a good REST API design?

Current GET /channels JSON data

[
   "channel": {
      "channelName": "KRON4",
    },
   "channel": {
      "channelName": "KTOV5",
    },
   ...
]

Expected JSON data for new API GET /channels/on_now below

[
  {
   "channel": {
      "channelName": "KRON4",
    },
    "on_now": {
      "startTime": "2012-06-04T11:30:00",
      "endTime": "2012-06-04T12:00:00",
      "shortDescription": "Latest local, statewide & national news events, along with sports & weather.",
      "shortTitle": "4:30am Newscast"
    }
  },
  {
   "channel": {
      "channelName": "KTOV5",
    },
    "on_now": {
      "startTime": "2012-06-04T11:30:00",
      "endTime": "2012-06-04T12:30:00",
      "shortDescription": "Local morning news and weather report",
      "shortTitle": "Morning Newscast"
    }
  },
  ...next channel...
]
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5 Answers 5

I'm no API expert, but I think you should be thinking in what you are returning instead of where 'looks like makes sense' to place the resource.

One solution will be to treat on_now as a resource.

so your api will be:

/channels (all channels)
/channels/{channel-id} (the {channel-id} channel - could be bbc and can have a collection of shows)
/channels/{channel-id}/shows (shows of channel-id)
/channels/{channel-id}/shows?filter=on_now (you are filtering a result, so i guess it's better to use query string, as if you were doing a query)

then you want to returns what's on now, that's no a property of the channel but a resource of itself. so how to implement that ?

/on_now/ (return a collection of on_now objects, which may be anything, channels, shows, whatever)
/on_now/?channel={channel-id} (this is a filter of the list by channel-id, you are just narrowing the list)

so isn't /channels/{channel-id}/shows?filter=on_now the same as /on_now/?channel={channel-id} ?

actually, NO.

In the first uri you are getting shows filtered by a on_now. In the second you are getting on_nows (which can be any representation, not exclusively a show) filtered by channel.

Why I think on_now should be treated as a resource and why is it important ?

While you make this resource separate, you can now have different representations of your resources. Also you have greater flexibility and no collision. Let's say tomorrow you want to show also in the on_now another 'show' that isn't on any channel, this can easily be done, on the other approachs it just has to be on a channel. You can also later filter the on_now by different criteria, because they are independent objects.

You can also do:

/on_now/{on_now_id} 

that will give details of the current show, like when it started, when it will end and also a place a location to /shows/{show-id} so you can reach it later after it's not on now anymore.

Yet, I think best solution would be to have shows as an unconnected resource to channel. But the most important thing is, i think you should also need to ask yourself if you want shows to be underlying of channels... And what hints to think of that is the

I don't want to make individual call for each channel, the show-on-now data needs to be returned for all channels

part.

That leads me to think that shows should NOT be inside the /channels/ path.

That's because another approach will be to have /shows/?filter=on_now if you are only returning shows.

you can have:

/shows/?filters=on_now&channel=bbc

I like to think of resources as the 'thing' i'm returning instead of the standard thinking of relations alone. Underlying in the graph is great for properties, not so sure about collection of 'other things'.

Following the same example, I would rather have /channels/{channel-id}/program instead of /channels/{channel-id}/shows

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You asked:

Is this a good REST API design?

YES, it is.

Contrary to the other people who have answered, you are free to define any resource you want to, as long as it represents a noun. That includes time-dependent services such as "what's on TV now" or the perrenial example, "current weather in <city>". These service resources are just as valid as more static ones representing a show or channel.

I would however change the URI. /channels looks like a collection resource URI. I would expect it's children to be channels, such as /channels/kron4 (you can use any unique string, not jsut the ID, to identify instance resources).
As such, /channels/on_now looks odd. It looks like a channel called "on_now". Although there's nothing preventing you from using that, it may later conflict with a channel that is called "On Now"! I would simply use /on_now as your URI. /channels/kron4/on_now would obviously be good for a single channel's response too.

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Just appending to the above answer:

/Channels/bbc/Shows/time/now -----> Get all the show played on BBC now
/Channels/bbc/Shows/time/2011-03-27T03:00:00.000+02:00 -----> Get all the show played on BBC  on 2011-03-27T03:00:00.000+02:00 .

This is more extensible and you wont have to worry about any show with the name current.

EDIT: You can get a good headstart of doing such thing if you can get an api-doc access over here https://developer.sdp.nds.com/page/about

As per me, there would be more data needed and api would be something like: //epg?time=&start=0&limit=1&duration=

This would define a generic api to get the location based tv_listing information based on time and duration. Result would be paginated with all the show between the channel listing occuring in the given time span.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't wish to make individual call for each channel, please see updated question. –  Bob Jun 5 '12 at 0:11

I would advice to concentrate on content, not on URLs.

Example: you've got an entry point, '/'. This is the only URL in the API. GET on it return st like

{
    "channels" : {
        "href" : "path.to/channels"
        },
    "programs" : {
        "href" : "path.to/programs"
        }
}

To retrieve the list of channels, you GET on the corresponding URL - which you then don't need to know before - and obtain, for example:

[
    {
        "name" : "BBC",
        "id" : 452,
        "href" : "path.to/channels/452"
    },
    {
        "name" : "FOO",
        "id"   : 112,
        "href" : "path.to/channels/112"
    }
] 

For detailled information about BBC, you GET on the provided URL:

{
    "name" : "BBC",
    "id" : 452,
    "self" : "path.to/channels/452",
    "live_url" : "link.to.bbc.cast",
    "whatever" : "bar",
    "current" : "path.to/channels/452/current",
    "program" : "path.to/channels/452/program"
}

And so on. URLs are discovered on the fly; you are free to modify them anytime. What makes your API is the content: you have to agree with clients about what is returned (fields, types, ...). You finally call the "current" URL above to obtain information about current program.

Read here for more: http://kellabyte.com/2011/09/04/clarifying-rest/

Edit after OP-comment:

You could introduce an 'embed' parameter so as to limit amount of requests:

GET path.to/channels/452?embed=current

would return:

{
    "name" : "BBC",
    "id" : 452,
    "self" : "path.to/channels/452",
    "live_url" : "link.to.bbc.cast",
    "whatever" : "bar",
    "current" : {
        "self" : "path.to/channels/452/current",
        "name" : "Morning Show",
        "start_time" : "(datetime here)",
        "end_time"   : "(datetime here)",
        "next"       : "whatever.comes.ne/xt"
        },
    "program" : "path.to/channels/452/program"
}
share|improve this answer
    
Making the top level a discovery service is a good idea but it still doesn't address my fundamental need, please see updated question. –  Bob Jun 5 '12 at 0:11
    
I solved this for my needs following way: I stick to the entity oriented transactions, and introduced an 'embed' parameter: GET path.to/channels/452?embed=current would return the data as above, including expanded data for the 'current' attribute. See my edit. –  jmclem Jun 5 '12 at 7:01
    
I appreciate the suggestion but even with the updated example, I still need to make a separate call for each channel, in your case, BBC with id 452. I don't want that, I want 1 call that returns all the channels and for each channel, what's on now. –  Bob Jun 5 '12 at 15:00
    
I'd say that nothing prevents you from defining the content type for list of channels as you wish: the GET path.to/channels may return whatever you define, including a list of detailled information about each channel with current program, as you showed in your latest edit of the question. It may then make sense to introduce a new conceptual entity, i.e. return this information upon 'GET /on_air' for example. –  jmclem Jun 5 '12 at 19:39
    
Is GET /on_air any more RESTful than GET channels/on_now? –  Bob Jun 5 '12 at 20:01
/Channels -----------------------> Get All Channels
/Channels/bbc  ------------------> Get BBC Channel
/Channels/bbc/Shows -------------> Get All shows in BBC
/Channels/bbc/Shows/Baseball ----> Get the show called "Baseball", in bbc channel
/Channels/bbc/Shows/current -----> Get the Current show running, in bbc channel

Assuming you do not (and will not ) have a show called Current for any of your channels ! :) .

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion but that doesn't exactly work for my needs, see updated question for expected JSON data. I need the show-on-now info for each channel in the get-all-channels API. –  Bob Jun 4 '12 at 22:53

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