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Given markup like this:

<div class="a">A</div>
<div class="b">B</div>
<div class="a">A</div>
<div class="b">B</div>
<div class="a">A</div>
<div class="b">B</div>

Is it possible to style this document to look like this:

|-------|---------|
|       |         |
|   A   |    B    |
|       |         |
|-------|---------|
|       |         |
|   A   |    B    |
|       |         |
|-------|---------|
|       |         |
|   A   |    B    |
|       |         |
|-------|---------|

(and if the content in A or B is longer, its neighbor will grow to match its height)…

without any additional markup?

I understand that giving .a and .b a display value of table-cell would just make this one big row.

What’s the solution?

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Can we get a jsfiddle? –  SomeKittens Jun 4 '12 at 22:10
    
Sure. Markup + naïve css: jsfiddle.net/alanhogan/9VLgN –  Alan H. Jun 4 '12 at 22:15
    
My bet is there is no solution –  Mikael Jun 4 '12 at 22:20
    
it's not going to work without additional markup, you will need a wrapper or two in order float the elements how you want them –  Keith Jun 4 '12 at 22:21
1  
@Alan, as you write about pairs, it seems that the data actually is logically structured into pairs, so extra markup would be adequate. And using markup that groups the data into pairs, you could make the pairs inline block and let browsers handle the situation, without using table properties in CSS. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jun 5 '12 at 3:44

7 Answers 7

No, I think it's not possible "without any additional markup". It needs:

  • div wrapper with display: table-row; containing A anb B "cells"
  • JavaScript with listeners on divs, which will determine max of A anb B's heights in each pair and set it to smaller one

Solution for second one:

CSS:

.a, .b {
    padding: 0.5em;
    float: left;
}
.a:nth-child(n+1) {
    clear: both;
}

jQuery:

$(function() {
    var max_width_a = 0, max_width_b = 0;
    $("div.a").each(function() {
        var elem_a = $(this),
            elem_b = elem_a.next("div.b"),
            height_a = elem_a.height(),
            height_b = elem_b.height(),
            pair = [elem_a, elem_b];

        max_width_a = Math.max(max_width_a, elem_a.width());    
        max_width_b = Math.max(max_width_b, elem_b.width());  
        $(pair).height(Math.max(height_a, height_b));
    }).width(max_width_a);
    $("div.b").width(max_width_b);
});

I've updated your Fiddle. Works on document ready, you have to customize it if you want to determine dynamic height changes.

Let me know if I have to explain how it works. Of course you can coerce div.a and div.b's width in CSS and don't check for max width with jQuery (then you will have to determine only max height in each pair).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I would rather not use jQuery or any JS for this, though. It’s really not something that should require JS. CSS is better suited for it, as browsers know when to redraw things, and JS doesn’t know when it’s needed to recalculate things. (E.g.: The contents of one of those divs change. Now this function needs called.) –  Alan H. Jun 5 '12 at 8:46
    
Of course you're right, it should be doable with pure CSS, but when it's not, I wrote script for it. I've been testing CSS solutions, but couldn't achieve what you want. –  Wirone Jun 5 '12 at 8:58

no, this is not possible without giving each row a wrapper.

here's a pure css solution with a single containing wrapper (per row)

.row { 
    background-color: #ccc;
    float: left;
    margin: 10px 0;
    padding: 1em;
    width: 50%;
    }
.a {
    float: left;
    width: 45%;
    }
.b {
    float: right;
    width: 45%;
    }

and the html

<div class="row">
    <div class="a">Mofo break yo neck, yaonna chung fizzle, bizzle dizzle dang dolor boom shackalack augue. Fizzle izzle away sit its fo riz</div>
    <div class="b">Lorizzle hizzle dolizzle sit amet, brizzle adipiscing elizzle. Nullam i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle shizzlin dizzle, fo shizzle mah nizzle fo rizzle, mah home g-dizzle sizzle, suscipit quizzle, i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle vizzle, arcu. Break yo neck, yall shiznit tortor. Sed eros. Ma nizzle izzle you son of a bizzle dapibizzle turpishizzle. Integizzle check out this velit sed fo.</div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div class="a">Sizzle ullamcorpizzle. Shut the shizzle up sagittizzle dizzle a shiznit. Vestibulizzle you son of a bizzle ipsizzle primis izzle faucibus orci pot et ultrices posuere dope Fo shizzle; Crazy vestibulizzle. Fo shizzle my nizzle habitant morbi tristique senectus ma nizzle netizzle izzle tellivizzle famizzle turpis hizzle. Donizzle tempor hendrerit hizzle. Aliquizzle erat volutpat. </div>
    <div class="b">Vivamizzle sagittis.rttitizzle izzle, boom shackalack hizzle, orci. Integizzle hizzle funky fresh lectus. </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div class="a">Donizzle tempor hendrerit hizzle. Aliquizzle erat volutpat. Things crunk fizzle, scelerisque bizzle, daahng dawg the bizzle, crackalackin shiznit, arcu. Daahng dawg elizzle. Crazy fermentizzle, est izzlot purizzle , bibendizzle sizzle amizzle, fo shizzle vehicula, fo shizzle my nizzle malesuada, shizznit. Aenizzle fizzle ipsizzle izzle est ullamcorpizzle tincidunt. Cool quizzle. Mauris ligula urna, tempizzle shut th</div>
    <div class="b">Mofo break yo neck, yall fo shizzle izzle leo bibendum crackalackin. Vivamizzle shit tortor vizzle away. Brizzle malesuada fo magna. Dang commodo, nisl nizzle go to hizzle egestizzle, magna dolor w</div>
</div>

if you want a and b to have different background colors you will have to use height:100%

share|improve this answer
    
With float: left; you will not get same height for each pair .a and .b since those element would have each own height based on content. height:100% possibly would fix it, but Alan wants .as to be same width like in table, see his ascii-artworked-example ;) He should then coerce width: ...; but he didn't say he want it to be fixed. Also, with floating divs wrapper should have height: auto; overflow: auto;. Wrapper should have display: table-row; and child divs must be display: table-cell; and this should work, but he don't want additional markup... –  Wirone Jun 5 '12 at 9:01
    
if you take the code and put it into an html doc you'll see that this gives the illusion of a table. also, the question was if it is possible without any additional markup and the answer is no. that said, this is the way to do it with as little extra markup as possible. –  kristina childs Jun 5 '12 at 16:30
    
of course floats don't dictate height. that's why you need to put .a and .b in a wrapper. by doing so, the largest content in each cell will push the entire wrapper down, making the next row in the grid align correctly. this works perfectly if the background color of each row is the same (why there is a #ccc so it's easily seen), however if the background colors of .a and .b are to be different, there would need to be 100% height added to one or more classes. you don't need display: table-row or table-cell to do this, though –  kristina childs Jun 5 '12 at 16:30
    
display: block wouldn't be a bad idea depending on how you want to style it. like i said, this is the best way to do it with as little markup possible. –  kristina childs Jun 5 '12 at 16:30
    
You didn't understand my entire comment, I think. In your solution each .a and each .b must have width: ...px; because only then it will look like table. And you don't know if fixed width is needed here. If not, display: table-cell; is the solution, because the elements will automatically fit to each other. float: right; for .b is unnecessary too, it can be float: left; like .a. If every child of the wrapper is floating, wrapper's calculated height would be 0px, that's I wrote height: auto; overflow: auto; for. Nevermind - it's not the solution for Alan. –  Wirone Jun 5 '12 at 16:53

i put this in a comment, but should probably just make it an answer. here's how you do the same thing (using rows) forcing a 100% height as well

.row {
    background-color: #ccc;
    float: left;
    margin: 10px 0;
    padding: 1em;
    width: 50%;
}

#container_a {
    background-color: blue;
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    right: 50%;
    width: 100%;
}
#container_b {
    background-color: red;
    float: left;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    right: 0;
    width: 100%;
}
#column_a {
    float: left;
    left: 50%;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    width: 46%;
}
#column_b {
    float: left;
    left: 56%;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    width: 46%;
}

and the html

<div class="row">
    <div id="container_b">
        <div id="container_a">
            <div id="column_a">Lorizzle hizzle dolizzle sit amet, brizzle adipiscing elizzle. Nullam i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle shizzlin dizzle, fo shizzle mah nizzle fo rizzle, mah home g-dizzle sizzle, suscipit quizzle, i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle vizzle, arcu. Break yo neck, yall shiznit tortor. Sed eros. Ma nizzle izzle you son of a bizzle dapibizzle turpishizzle. Integizzle check out this velit sed fo.</div>
            <div id="column_b">Vivamizzle sagittis.rttitizzle izzle, boom shackalack hizzle, orci. Integizzle hizzle funky fresh lectus. </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div id="container_b">
        <div id="container_a">
            <div id="column_a">Lorizzle hizzle dolizzle sit amet, brizzle adipiscing elizzle. Nullam i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle shizzlin dizzle, fo shizzle mah nizzle fo rizzle, mah home g-dizzle sizzle, suscipit quizzle, i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle vizzle, arcu. Break yo neck, yall shiznit tortor. Sed eros. Ma nizzle izzle you son of a bizzle dapibizzle turpishizzle. Integizzle check out this velit sed fo.</div>
            <div id="column_b">Vivamizzle sagittis.rttitizzle izzle, boom shackalack hizzle, orci. Integizzle hizzle funky fresh lectus. </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div id="container_b">
        <div id="container_a">
            <div id="column_a">Lorizzle hizzle dolizzle sit amet, brizzle adipiscing elizzle. Nullam i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle shizzlin dizzle, fo shizzle mah nizzle fo rizzle, mah home g-dizzle sizzle, suscipit quizzle, i saw beyonces tizzles and my pizzle went crizzle vizzle, arcu. Break yo neck, yall shiznit tortor. Sed eros. Ma nizzle izzle you son of a bizzle dapibizzle turpishizzle. Integizzle check out this velit sed fo.</div>
            <div id="column_b">Vivamizzle sagittis.rttitizzle izzle, boom shackalack hizzle, orci. Integizzle hizzle funky fresh lectus. </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
JSFiddle here. Okay, I’ll give you that some sort of row wrapper seems necessary – but three wrappers for each row? –  Alan H. Jun 6 '12 at 6:03
    
if you want each containing div to be equal height WITHOUT any scripting, yes. i've gotten around this in the past by making a sectioned background image (say a 800x1px strip) that gives the illusion of background colors and borders. if you want a div that's 100% height of the whole window, all you need to make sure body has a 100% height in it as well as the divs within it. but this won't work for ROWS of divs, only columns 100% height of the entire browser window –  kristina childs Jun 6 '12 at 16:23
    
like this: kristinachilds.com/example/testes2.html of course, this won't work for fluid layouts and is overall a pretty antiquated way of doing things –  kristina childs Jun 6 '12 at 17:00
    
My original question mentions CSS display: table-* properties. Undoubtedly using them would mean you really only need one wrapper per row. (Of course, you lose IE7 compatibility without some kind of shim/polyfill.) –  Alan H. Jun 6 '12 at 22:20
1  
yeah, that's the point. table-cell isn't bulletproof. if you dont' need to support IE6 or 7 then table-cell is the easier way to go (with the single wrapper of course) –  kristina childs Jun 14 '12 at 20:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not without flexbox, which hasn’t landed in several major browsers yet, seems to be the consensus.

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I've written a jQuery plugin that accomplishes this. It converts a float layout into a display:table layout and handles the rows for you. Cell widths are handled automatically without script (much faster). It's responsive too. It's called WRECKER!! Hahahaha!.

svachon.com/blog/wrecker-responsive-equal-height-columns-and-rows/

share|improve this answer
    
Nice documentation page. Love the how-it-works section; it answers what questions I’d have. –  Alan H. Feb 4 '13 at 17:44

You CAN do this without flexbox, but you'll need to use nth-child(). Have a look at this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/12589629/740836

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I can't think of a way without a row wrapper, but if you know the exact width of the outer div will never change, it is possible to achieve. My workaround for this is relying on the wrapper size to fit a and b on same row and then the next a and b will automatically be pushed so that it wraps around to the next row. However, if the width of the wrapper shrinks, a and b won't go on the same line.

<div id="wrapper">
  <div class="a">A</div>
  <div class="b">B</div>
  <div class="a">A</div>
  <div class="b">B</div>
</div>

<style>
#wrapper { width: 500px;}
.a { background-color:green; float:left; width:50%;}
 .b {background-color:red;float:left;width:50%;}
</style>

http://jsfiddle.net/Lf0arzkn/1/

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