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Writing a bit of code that deals with a Response and a Request. Both can be in the form of XML, and both can be in the form of a C# Object created through a transform and serialization. (this is .NET 2.0)

Response and Request are base implementations of larger message types. Right now I have GetEligibility and FindCandidates.

Example of the Model.MessageModel classes used below:

public partial class GetEligibilityResponseMessage : ResponseMessage

public partial class ResponseMessage : Message

Because I won't want to duplicate my mapping functionality I've decided to use generics to simplify the process, and it's working out great:

Base Class Code

    public virtual Model.MessageModel.Message MapToModel<T>(XmlDocument xml)
    {
        V3Mapper mapper = new V3Mapper();
        Model.MessageModel.Message message = mapper.MapToDomainModel<T>(xml, Environment) as Model.MessageModel.Message;
        return message;
    }

    public virtual XmlDocument MapToXml<T>(Model.MessageModel.Message message)
    {
        V3Mapper mapper = new V3Mapper();
        XmlDocument xml= mapper.MapToV3Message<T>(message, Environment);
        return xml;
    }

When my code is first called, it has an XML document. I know this document will be mapped as a request, and so I call a virtual method that is overriden (and I think it's ugly). The reason to keep the mapping code in the base is to not duplicate code, yet I find I am doing the exact thing I want to avoid by the following:

GetEligibility : BaseClass

   public override Model.MessageModel.Message MapToModel<T>(XmlDocument xml)
    {   
        if(typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(GetEligibilityResponseMessage)))
        {
            return base.MapToModel<GetEligibilityResponseMessage>(xml);
        }
        else if (typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(GetEligibilityRequestMessage))) 
        {
            return base.MapToModel<GetEligibilityRequestMessage>(xml);
        }
        return null;//because this is a quick code snippet
    }

Is there a more elegant way of doing this? I always know if I'm working with a Response or Request. I want to leave the functionality open so it's not too tightly-coupled, but at the same time have it functional and fast.

This will be implemented by a number of different message types, and I really hate copy/paste style of coding, so an elegant solution would be great, but I'm not sure if there is one. (.NET 2.0)

share|improve this question
    
My advice, don't do that. That will just lead to confusing code. –  Jeff Mercado Jun 5 '12 at 0:25
    
As opposed to having pretty much the same 2 functions copy/pasted in 10 different classes? not my cup of tea either. I'm not a fan of the last code block, hence the reason for asking about it –  Ryan Ternier Jun 5 '12 at 0:34
    
Provided that there are no classes derived from GetEligibilityResponseMessage and GetEligibilityRequestMessage, your overriden MapToModel is equivalent to the base one, with the exception of type checking. What is the point of overriding MapToModel method, then? Is it just for type checking? –  Bojan Resnik Jun 5 '12 at 1:49
    
Yes the only reason I overrode it was to get the correct type, otherwise the base code would not know what it was supposed to use. Still trying to see if there's a better way –  Ryan Ternier Jun 5 '12 at 16:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the MethodInfo.MakeGenericMethod Method to avoid having to check types before calling your generic method. Below is a quick usage example:

class Program
{
    public static void Generic<T>(T toDisplay)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("\r\nHere it is: {0}", toDisplay);
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MethodInfo mi = typeof(Program).GetMethod("Generic");
        MethodInfo miConstructed = mi.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(DateTime));

        DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
        miConstructed.Invoke(null, new object[] { now });
    }
}

Notice that I used typeof(DateTime), but in your case you can replace that by typeof(T) to achieve the desired loosely-coupled solution.

share|improve this answer

If you just want to validate the request and response types, you can have your base class know about that:

public class BaseClass
{
    private readonly Type _requestType;
    private readonly Type _responseType;

    protected BaseClass(Type requestType, Type responseType)
    {
        _requestType = requestType;
        _responseType = responseType;
    }

    public T MapToModel<T>(XmlDocument xml)
    {
        if (typeof(T) != _requestType && typeof(T) != _responseType)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Invalid type");

        var mapper = new V3Mapper();
        return mapper.MapToDomainModel<T>(xml, Environment);
    }
}

public GetEligibility : BaseClass
{
    public GetEligibility() 
        : base(typeof(GetEligibilityRequestMessage), typeof(GetEligibilityResponseMessage))
    {}
}

You can even go a step further and make BaseClass generic, with dedicated MapToRequest and MapToResponse methods which know what to return:

public class BaseClass<TRequest, TResponse>
    where TRequest:RequestMessage,
          TResponse:ResponseMessage
{
    public TRequest MapToRequest(XmlDocument xml)
    { return MapToModel<TRequest>(xml); }

    public TResponse MapToResponse(XmlDocument xml)
    { return MapToModel<TResponse>(xml); }

    private T MapToModel<T>(XmlDocument xml)
    {
        var mapper = new V3Mapper();
        return mapper.MapToDomainModel<T>(xml, Environment);        
    }
}

public GetEligibility : BaseClass<GetEligibilityRequestMessage, GetEligibilityResponseMessage>
{}
share|improve this answer

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