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so for example i had a text file with peoples phone numbers,name,address. that looked like this with a return at the end of each line

555-667282,bill higs,67 hilltop

555-328382,john paul,85 big road

555-457645,zac fry,45 tony's rd

555-457645,kim fry,45 tony's rd

and i wanted to put it all in a dictionary and in the dictionary the phone number was the key and there name and address was a list. so if i wanted to print the dictionary it would look something like this. what would be the code to do this

{555-667282: ['bill higs','67 hilltop'], 555-328382: ['john paul','85 big road'], 555-457645: ['zac fry','45 tony's rd'],['kim fry','45 tony's rd']}

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Jun 6 '12 at 12:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
have you tried using csv? –  IT Ninja Jun 5 '12 at 0:36

2 Answers 2

dicto = {}

with open('your_file.txt') as f:
    for line in f:
        s_line = line.rstrip().split(',')
        dicto[s_line[0]] = s_line[1:]

Edit:

To handle cases where there are multiple entries associated with one phone number:

from collections import defaultdict

dicto = defaultdict(list)

with open('your_file.txt') as f:
    for line in f:
        s_line = line.rstrip().split(',')
        dicto[s_line[0]].append(s_line[1:])
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This doesn't properly handle the case where there are two entries with the same phone number. –  martineau Jun 5 '12 at 17:27
    
I missed that. Thanks for pointing this out. I edited my post to address that point. –  Akavall Jun 5 '12 at 18:03

This file format is what the csv module in the standard library was designed to handle. However you can't have a dictionary laid-out the way you want because a dictionary key can only map to one thing. A simple way to work around that limitation is to map each phone number to a list of lists, as shown in the sample code and output below:

import csv

result = {}
with open('numbers.txt', 'rb') as input:
    for phone_number, name, address in csv.reader(input):
        if phone_number in result:
            result[phone_number] += [[name, address]]
        else:
            result[phone_number] = [[name, address]]

print result

Output:

{'555-328382': [['john paul', '85 big road']], 
 '555-457645': [['zac fry', "45 tony's rd"], ['kim fry', "45 tony's rd"]], 
 '555-667282': [['bill higs', '67 hilltop']]}

The code within the inner for loop can be simplified by using another standard library class called defaultdict which is a subclass of dict. They automatically initialize dictionary entries to a specified default value whenever a non-existent one's value is referenced. Here's how one could be applied to this example:

import collections
import csv

result = collections.defaultdict(list)
with open('numbers.txt', 'rb') as input:
    for phone_number, name, address in csv.reader(input):
        result[phone_number] += [[name, address]]

print result

Output of second version:

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {
 '555-328382': [['john paul', '85 big road']],
 '555-457645': [['zac fry', "45 tony's rd"], ['kim fry', "45 tony's rd"]],
 '555-667282': [['bill higs', '67 hilltop']]})

defaultdict objects can otherwise be used just like a regular dictionary by the rest of your code.

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