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I'm essentially making a form that pre-calculates most of its fields. So, I have a bunch of methods that rely on previous methods, or should return nil. At the moment I'm doing a series of checks, and I'd like to remove them.

(Ignore the calculations, they are just examples)

def age
  return unless dob  # Not so bad... 
  Date.today - dob
end

def age_at_start
  return unless dob && start_date  # Getting worse
  start_date - dob
end

def compensation
  return unless age_at_start && time_worked && salary && staff_rating  # Shoot me now
  some_calculation(age_at_start, time_worked, salary, staff_rating)
end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It partially depends on what you're really doing, aside from the example--without context it's difficult to know what would be the most meaningful under the circumstances.

Can't do much better than:

def age
  Date.today - dob if dob
end

Same with this one--I wouldn't break out the guard clause yet:

def age_at_start
  dob && start_date ? start_date - dob : nil
end

Here I'd break out the guard clause, because (a) you can, and (b) IMO testing is easier:

def compensation
  some_calculation if can_be_compensated?
end

def can_be_compensated?
  age_at_start && time_worked && salary && staff_rating
end

If some_calculation is actually 'external' and needs the args, I might wrap it in a method that has access like your original and can_be_compensated?.

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I like these. For your second statement, would dob && start_date && start_date - dob also work? –  Anil Jun 5 '12 at 1:58
    
@Anil Not sure, I'd have to try it--it'd look nicer if it, though! Not sure how readable it is; I'd have to think about that. Good idea. –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 2:27

I always have trouble when conditionals start getting too long as well. Once thing that helps though is to wrap some of them into individual methods. This route will at least provide you with a couple public methods that you can stub out in your tests.

def age
  return unless dob
  Date.today - dob
end

def age_at_start
  return unless valid_age_at_start(start_date, dob)
  start_date - dob
end

def compensation
  return unless valid_compensation(age_at_start, time_worked, salary, staff_rating)
  some_calculation(time_worked, age_at_finish, salary, staff_rating)
end

def valid_age_at_start(start_date, dob)
  start_date && dob
end

def valid_compensation(age_at_start, time_worked, salary, staff_rating)
  age_at_start && time_worked && salary && staff_rating
end

Or you could create a method that just validates your arguments:

def age
  return unless dob
  Date.today - dob
end

def age_at_start
  return unless valid_arguments?(start_date, dob)
  start_date - dob
end

def compensation
  return unless valid_arguments?(age_at_start, time_worked, salary, staff_rating)
  some_calculation(time_worked, age_at_finish, salary, staff_rating)
end

private

def valid_arguments?(*args)
  args.each do |arg|
    return false unless arg
  end
  return true
end

Admittedly both routes are still sort of ugly though.

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I thought about a method like that at the start, doesn't reduce complexity very much though. –  Alex Jun 5 '12 at 1:15
    
Yea, I'm not sure if you'll be able to extract the complexity, but sometimes it helps to not call the complexity directly. So when I encounter stuff like this, unfortunately, I'll sometimes just abstract it into a descriptive method instead. Then just write a test for both. Still, you're right, it's not too much better. –  Shane O'Connor Jun 5 '12 at 1:18
    
I don't have an intrinsic problem with things like valid_arguments? (although it's actually just args.all? { |a| a } or even shorter) but as soon as what "valid" means changes, all hell breaks loose! –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 1:33
    
Agreed. I don't particularly like the second solution. valid_arguments?, it's only moderately descriptive, but I'm not sure how to succinctly describe a chain of conditions that long. –  Shane O'Connor Jun 5 '12 at 1:37
    
I'm not really sure you can, unless there are intermediate refactorings that make sense, or a descriptive DSL--overkill and more-verbose in this case, clearly :) –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 2:28
def age
  (Date.today - dob) if dob
end

def age_at_start
  (start_date - dob) if dob && start_date
end

def compensation
  some_calculation(time_worked, age_at_finish, salary, staff_rating) if age_at_start && time_worked && salary && staff_rating
end
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That's no better! :P –  Alex Jun 5 '12 at 1:14
    
Tough to make them shorter than 1 line and readable on the left side. Or drop all checks and make sure your logic never gets here without valid data. –  Anil Jun 5 '12 at 1:16
    
@Alex First one is, except it's backwards, isn't it? –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 1:21
    
I thought you didn't care for content. My bad. Fixed now. –  Anil Jun 5 '12 at 1:32
    
@Anil Why would you think that? I'm big on correctness, as much as possible. Also, when replying, make sure (a) you're replying to the right person ;) and (b) you use the @ character, otherwise they may not know you've replied to them. –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 1:36

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