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Suppose that we would like to separate out the read and write access in an interface pattern as below.

namespace accesspattern
{
    namespace ReadOnly
    {
        public interface IA { double get_a(); }
    }
    namespace Writable
    {
        public interface IA : ReadOnly.IA { void set_a(double value); }
    }
}

This is easy to implement:

namespace accesspattern
{
    namespace ReadOnly
    {
        public class A : IA
        {
            protected double a;
            public double get_a() { return a; }
        }
    }
    namespace Writable
    {
        public class A : ReadOnly.A, IA
        {
            public void set_a(double value) { base.a = value; }
        }

    }
}

Suppose that we need another class which inherits from A and so we go ahead and define an interface for it:

namespace accesspattern
{
    namespace ReadOnly
    {
        public interface IB : ReadOnly.IA { int get_b(); }

    }
    namespace Writable
    {
        public interface IB : ReadOnly.IB, Writable.IA { void set_b(int value); }
    }
}

Implementing this is not so easy. One always feels that Writable.B should inherit from two base classes, Writable.A and ReadOnly.B, to avoid repeated code.

Is there a recommended Design Pattern to use? The aim is to be able to return "read access only" and "read write access" objects separately (decided at compile time) depending on requirements. It would be nice if the solution pattern makes it easy to add more layers of inheritance, classes C, D...

I know that the issue of Multiple Inheritance crops up here and that it has been discussed at length elsewhere in many, many, places. But my question is not so much "How to implement the interfaces which are defined inside the namespace accesspattern without using multiple inheritance" (although I would like to learn the best way to do that) but rather, how can we define the ReadOnly/Writable versions of a class separately and also support inheritance without it getting very, very, messy?

For what it is worth here is one (messy) solution [see below for much a better implementation]:

    namespace accesspattern
    {
        namespace ReadOnly
        {
            public class A : IA
            {
                protected double a;
                public double get_a() { return a; }
            }
            public class B : IB
            {
                protected int b;
                public int get_b() { return b; }
            }
        }
        namespace Writable
        {
            public class A : ReadOnly.A, IA
            {
                public void set_a(double value) { base.a = value; }
            }
            public class B : ReadOnly.B, IB
            {
                private IA aObj;
                public double get_a() { return aObj.get_a(); }
                public void set_a(double value) { aObj.set_a(value); }
                public void set_b(int value) { base.b = value; }
                public B() { aObj = new A(); }
            }
        }
    }
}

Update: I think that this (below) is what Eugene is talking about. This implementation pattern is pretty good, I think. By only passing around "writeProtected" views of classes one can implement algorithms which require that the state of the class will not change and only use "writeEnabled" views where it is meant that the function will/could cause a change in state avoiding.

namespace access
{

    // usual usage is at least readable
    public interface IA { double get_a(); }
    public interface IB : IA { int get_b(); }

    // special usage is writable as well
    namespace writable
    {
        public interface IA : access.IA { void set_a(double value);  }
        public interface IB : access.IB, IA { void set_b(int value);}
    }

    // Implement the whole of A in one place
    public class A : writable.IA
    {
        private double a;
        public double get_a() { return a; }
        public void set_a(double value) { a = value; }
        public A() { }

        //support write-protection
        public static IA writeProtected() { return new A(); }
        public static writable.IA writable() { return new A(); }
    }
    // implement the whole of B in one place and now no issue with using A as a base class
    public class B : A, writable.IB
    {
        private int b;
        public double get_b() { return b; }
        public void set_b(int value) { b = value; }
        public B() : base() { }

        // support write protection 
        public static IB writeProtected() { return new B(); }
        public static writable.IB writable() { return new B(); }
    }

    public static class Test
    {
        static void doSomething(IA a)
        {
            // a is read-only
        }
        static void alterState(writable.IB b)
        {
            // b is writable
        }
        static void example()
        {
            // Write protected
            IA a = access.A.writeProtected();
            IB b = access.B.writeProtected();

            // write enabled
            writable.IA A = access.A.writable();
            writable.IB B = access.B.writable();

            Console.WriteLine(a.get_a());
            B.set_b(68);

            doSomething(A); // passed as writeprotected
            alterState(B); // passed as writable
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can't you use properties? You can specify access for each get and set individually. I also remember that List<> has a AsReadOnly(). Maybe it's similar, but it would have to be called from a writable class. BTW, what's the reason for the clear separation of classes? –  cyanic Jun 5 '12 at 2:31
    
how can we define the ReadOnly/Writable versions of a class separately and also support inheritance without it getting very, very, messy? -- You should just create two interfaces(for write and read access) and inherit them from the one class, then create a fabrica where you will choose the needed version of your class. Fabrica will return instance of the class through the needed interface. that is all. –  Eugene Petrov Jun 5 '12 at 3:10
    
@GMMan Does using get set properties preclude the use of xml serialisation msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/182eeyhh%28VS.85%29.aspx? –  user859400 Jun 5 '12 at 3:28
    
@GMMan The reason for the separation of read write access is because there are many algorithms which only need to read the values of a class and do not need to make changes. Some algorithms can be written in a more efficient way if it is know that the object state will not change. E.g. During multi-threading the need for locks at certain times can be discarded. –  user859400 Jun 5 '12 at 3:33
    
@Eugene could you expand on what you mean with an example? Thanks. –  user859400 Jun 5 '12 at 3:51

2 Answers 2

You can provide the read/write access at Service level and not at Entity level. In that case you can code generate a wrapper around services that handles the read/write access. Patterns used: Decorator, Dependency Injection

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks for the suggestion. I think you comment is a suggestion though and not an answer. Ought to placed as a comment rather than an answer? Anyhow, what do you think of the code I put up before your comment on the bottom of the posting? Is it kind of what you are suggesting? If not then could you provide an example code to implement the interfaces? Thanks. –  user859400 Jun 5 '12 at 7:56

I know this thread is one year old, but I'm wondering if it would make sense to have something like this:

 interface ReadOnlyA
 {
    object A { get; }
 }

 interface WriteableA : ReadOnlyA
 {
   new object A {get; set;}
 }
share|improve this answer
    
You give someone a WriteableA instance disguised as ReadOnlyA. And they just cast it to WriteableA and modify it. –  Ark-kun Jun 14 '14 at 1:48
    
Well, it depends. If you actually control the writing access, most likely the WriteableA interface will be internal, and only the ReadOnlyA interface will be public, so no casting. –  Lorenzo Santoro Jun 16 '14 at 8:21
    
There is also a library scenario when both ReadOnlyA and WriteableA are available to external devs. This is common for collections. P.S. Found this question while searching for duplicates to my similar question. stackoverflow.com/questions/24216616/… –  Ark-kun Jun 16 '14 at 14:42
    
I see your point; I had the same issue back in time as I wanted to provide an "option panel" where the option model could be readable by every developer anywhere in the app, but the option model could be modified only via Option panel GUI. This way, using internal modifier I could achieve my goal, but it looks like it's different from your needs. –  Lorenzo Santoro Jun 17 '14 at 14:21

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