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I have declared array of known size,

typedef struct{
  ......
  char * buffer[height+1];    //height is a constant int
  ......} args;

int main{
 args * info;
 info = malloc (sizeof(args));
 char* output_buffer[width][height+1];    //width is also a constant int >= 4
 output_buffer[2] = malloc (sizeof(char)*char_per_line*(height+1)); // error same as below
 info->buffer = output_buffer[2];    // I know it's wrong. incompatible types in assignment
....}

Numbers are arbitrary and used just for illustration.

What i am doing is to assign the address of output_buffer[width] to info->buffer, and then pass info as an argument to a thread, which generates data an array of size height+1; in each slot is a cstring of length char_per_line. Those cstrings are stored in output_buffer[2].

I am confused here that isn't the output_buffer[2] a pointer of type char*[height+1]? Then why can't I assign address of memory from malloc to it?

Also, I know that I cannot assign an array to an array, but how can I get the code work in desired way? If the solution is to use a char** as char*[height+1], then how can I access info->buffer[height], say?

Thanks in advance!

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to the requirement you are specifying, this is what you need to do

/* This is a 2D array of pointers. */
char* output_buffer[width][height+1]; 

for ( int i =0; i< width; i++ )
    for ( int j=0; j <height+1; j++ )
        output_buffer[i][j] = malloc (sizeof(char)*char_per_line*(height+1));

And then,

info->buffer[SOME_VALUE] =  output_buffer[SOME_WIDTH][SOME_HEIGHT];  

I am confused here that isn't the output_buffer[2] a pointer of type char*[height+1]? Then why can't I assign address of memory from malloc to it?

malloc returns a single dimensional pointer void* but as you have noted, output_buffer[2] is not a single dimensional pointer. It is of type char*[height+1]. [] adds one more dimension apart from the *.

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Yes, that works. Thanks! But I am still thinking about assignment at once without loop. Is there a way to do that? –  AoZ Jun 5 '12 at 6:33
    
@AoZ You can, but then what is the use of you declaring a 2D array of pointers ( output_buffer)? If there is an array, I am afraid you cant avoid the loop –  Pavan Manjunath Jun 5 '12 at 6:38
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isn't the output_buffer[2] a pointer of type char*[height+1]?

No. output_buffer[2] is an array of size height+1. Its element type is char*.

Then why can't I assign address of memory from malloc to it?

As you know, you cannot assign to an array.

array of size height+1; in each slot is a cstring of length char_per_line.

how can I get the code work in desired way?

If you need an array of (height+1) C strings, each of size char_per_line, you need to allocate (height+1) C strings of size char_per_line. That is, call malloc (height+1) times and pass char_per_line to each. (There's a way to do it in one call to malloc but you probably don't want to do that right now).

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typedef struct{
  ......
  char * buffer[height+1];    //height is a constant int
  ......} args

this has to be

typedef struct{
  ......
  char ** buffer;    //height is a constant int
  ......} args

output_buffer[2] = malloc (sizeof(char)*char_per_line*(height+1));

you have to this in a for loop, and for all output_buffer[i][j], (now it is char ** = char *).

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