Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a hash table that gets my Object as his key without converting it to String.

Some thing like this:

var object1 = new Object();
var object2 = new Object();

var myHash = new HashTable();

myHash.put(object1, "value1");
myHash.put(object2, "value2");

alert(myHash.get(object1), myHash.get(object2)); // I wish that it will print value1 value2

EDIT: See my answer for full solution

share|improve this question
    
There are new answers! :D –  Peter Mar 7 '14 at 0:30
    
Congrats @Peter –  Ilya_Gazman Mar 7 '14 at 8:02
    
In ES6, you can use WeakMap for this purpose. –  Gaspard Bucher Jun 7 at 11:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Here is a proposal:

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = {};
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( key, value ) {
        this.hashes[ JSON.stringify( key ) ] = value;
    },

    get: function( key ) {
        return this.hashes[ JSON.stringify( key ) ];
    }
};

The API is exactly as shown in your question.

You can't play with the reference in js however (so two empty objects will look like the same to the hashtable), because you have no way to get it. See this answer for more details: How to get javascript object references or reference count?

Jsfiddle demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HKz3e/

However, for the unique side of things, you could play with the original objects, like in this way:

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = {},
    this.id = 0;
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( obj, value ) {
        obj.id = this.id;
        this.hashes[ this.id ] = value;
        this.id++;
    },

    get: function( obj ) {
        return this.hashes[ obj.id ];
    }
};

Jsfiddle demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HKz3e/2/

This means that your objects need to have a property named id that you won't use elsewhere. If you want to have this property as non-enumerable, I suggest you take a look at defineProperty (it's not cross-browser however, even with ES5-Shim, it doesn't work in IE7).

It also means you are limited on the number of items you can store in this hashtable. Limited to 253, that is.

And now, the "it's not going to work anywhere" solution: use ES6 WeakMaps. They are done exactly for this purpose: having objects as keys. I suggest you read MDN for more information: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/WeakMap

It slightly differs from your API though (it's set and not put):

var myMap = new WeakMap(),
    object1 = {},
    object2 = {};

myMap.set( object1, 'value1' );
myMap.set( object2, 'value2' );

console.log( myMap.get( object1 ) ); // "value1"
console.log( myMap.get( object2 ) ); // "value2"

Jsfiddle demo with a weakmap shim: http://jsfiddle.net/Ralt/HKz3e/9/

However, weakmaps are implemented in FF and Chrome (only if you enable the "Experimental javascript features" flag in chrome however). There are shims available, like this one: https://gist.github.com/1269991. Use at your own risk.

You can also use Maps, they may more suit your needs, since you also need to store primitive values (strings) as keys. Doc, Shim.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a solution indeed, I am just wondering how heavy is that JSON.stringify –  Ilya_Gazman Jun 5 '12 at 7:44
    
@Babibu, it depends on the size of the object. The bigger it is, the longer it will take to stringify it. If storing objects in a simple array is overkill for you, then stringifying your thousands of objects will probably be too. –  this.lau_ Jun 5 '12 at 7:46
    
JSON.stringify is cheap. Really. This is not going to be the bottleneck of your application. –  Florian Margaine Jun 5 '12 at 7:47
6  
This is wrong. You cannot rely on the ordering of keys in JSON.stringify(). To different objects with the same keys and values are not guaranteed to return the same string with JSON.stringify() (even though they do "most of the time"). See javascript - Is there a deterministic equivalent of JSON.stringify? for a better (but not-trivial-JSON.stringify()) string for an object. –  Peter V. Mørch Jun 28 '13 at 5:35
2  
@FlorianMargaine I didn't read anywhere in that question that it should be deterministic on the same implementation. That seems to be the case, though. I did however read that MDN's stringify page says "Properties of non-array objects are not guaranteed to be stringified in any particular order. Do not rely on ordering of properties within the same object within the stringification." Even though it works today, there are no guarantees for tomorrow. –  Peter V. Mørch Jul 1 '13 at 18:42

Here is a simple Map implementation that will work with any type of key, including object references, and it will not mutate the key in any way:

function Map() {
    var keys = [], values = [];

    return {
        put: function (key, value) {
            var index = keys.indexOf(key);
            if(index == -1) {
                keys.push(key);
                values.push(value);
            }
            else {
                values[index] = value;
            }
        },
        get: function (key) {
            return values[keys.indexOf(key)];
        }
    };
}

While this yields the same functionality as a hash table, it's not actually implemented using a hash function since it iterates over arrays and has a worst case performance of O(n). However, for the vast majority of sensible use cases this shouldn't be a problem at all. The indexOf function is implemented by the JavaScript engine and is highly optimized.

share|improve this answer

I took @Florian Margaine suggestion to higher level and came up with this:

function HashTable(){
    var hash = new Object();
    this.put = function(key, value){
        if(typeof key === "string"){
            hash[key] = value;
        }
        else{
            if(key._hashtableUniqueId == undefined){
                key._hashtableUniqueId = UniqueId.prototype.genarateId();
            }
            hash[key._hashtableUniqueId] = value;
        }

    };

    this.get = function(key){
        if(typeof key === "string"){
            return hash[key];
        }
        if(key._hashtableUniqueId == undefined){
            return undefined;
        }
        return hash[key._hashtableUniqueId];
    };
}

function UniqueId(){

}

UniqueId.prototype._id = 0;
UniqueId.prototype.genarateId = function(){
    return (++UniqueId.prototype._id).toString();
};

///////// testing /////////////////

var hash = new HashTable();
var hash2 = new HashTable();

var object1 = new Object();
hash.put(object1, "Cocakola");
alert(hash.get(object1)); // Cocakola

hash2.put(object1, "Cocakola 2");
alert(hash2.get(object1)); // Cocakola 2

hash.put("myKey", "My Key");
alert(hash.get("myKey")); // My Key
alert(hash.get("my".concat("Key"))); // My Key

alert(hash.get("unknownKey")); // undefined
alert(hash.get(new Object())); // undefined
share|improve this answer
    
Glad you got it sorted out :) –  Florian Margaine Jun 6 '12 at 6:51
    
This requires that you always keep a reference to the object you used as a key, when calling put(). If you are going to do that, why map the values in the first place; why not just keep references to the values instead? Have you considered what will happen if you have two objects that are equivalent, but not the same object (!==) ? They should hash to the same value, but the get() method will fail you for any valid key that is not the exact object used in put() since you only added the ._hashtableUniqueId property to one of them. –  sethro Jan 17 '14 at 19:35
2  
Failing for non-identical objects is exactly the point. –  shanusmagnus Jun 20 '14 at 2:07

Here is a proposal, combining @Florian's solution with @Laurent's.

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = [];
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( key, value ) {
        this.hashes.push({
            key: key,
            value: value
        });
    },

    get: function( key ) {
        for( var i = 0; i < this.hashes.length; i++ ){
            if(this.hashes[i].key == key){
                return this.hashes[i].value;
            }
        }
    }
};

It wont change your object in any way and it doesn't rely on JSON.stringify.

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem with this, is it is not a "Hash" table; there is no hashing going on. You just created a misleading wrapper for an array. Also, because of your use of "==", you will get unexpected results when using mixed types as keys informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1997934&seqNum=5. –  sethro Jan 17 '14 at 18:34

Just use the strict equality operator when looking up the object: ===

var objects = [];
objects.push(object1);
objects.push(object2);

objects[0] === object1; // true
objects[1] === object1; // false

The implementation will depend on how you store the objects in the HashTable class.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not hashtable, this is bad practis of array list with efficiency of O(n). It's not what I am looking –  Ilya_Gazman Jun 5 '12 at 6:12
    
There is no built-in hash table in JavaScript so, if you don't want to convert the object to a string, you need to use an array and loop through it. How much data will your table store? –  this.lau_ Jun 5 '12 at 6:33
    
thousandths,I need to find a solution some how. Converting to string not promise me a unique key. –  Ilya_Gazman Jun 5 '12 at 6:55

I know that I am a year late, but for all others who stumble upon this thread, I've written the ordered object stringify to JSON, that solves the above noted dilemma: http://stamat.wordpress.com/javascript-object-ordered-property-stringify/

Also I was playing with custom hash table implementations which is also related to the topic: http://stamat.wordpress.com/javascript-quickly-find-very-large-objects-in-a-large-array/

//SORT WITH STRINGIFICATION

var orderedStringify = function(o, fn) {
    var props = [];
    var res = '{';
    for(var i in o) {
        props.push(i);
    }
    props = props.sort(fn);

    for(var i = 0; i < props.length; i++) {
        var val = o[props[i]];
        var type = types[whatis(val)];
        if(type === 3) {
            val = orderedStringify(val, fn);
        } else if(type === 2) {
            val = arrayStringify(val, fn);
        } else if(type === 1) {
            val = '"'+val+'"';
        }

        if(type !== 4)
            res += '"'+props[i]+'":'+ val+',';
    }

    return res.substring(res, res.lastIndexOf(','))+'}';
};

//orderedStringify for array containing objects
var arrayStringify = function(a, fn) {
    var res = '[';
    for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        var val = a[i];
        var type = types[whatis(val)];
        if(type === 3) {
            val = orderedStringify(val, fn);
        } else if(type === 2) {
            val = arrayStringify(val);
        } else if(type === 1) {
            val = '"'+val+'"';
        }

        if(type !== 4)
            res += ''+ val+',';
    }

    return res.substring(res, res.lastIndexOf(','))+']';
}
share|improve this answer

Using JSON.stringify() is completely awkward to me, and gives the client no real control over how their keys are uniquely identified. The objects that are used as keys should have a hashing function, but my guess is that in most cases overriding the toString() method, so that they will return unique strings, will work fine:

var myMap = {};

var myKey = { toString: function(){ return '12345' }};
var myValue = 6;

// same as myMap['12345']
myMap[myKey] = myValue;

Obviously, toString() should do something meaningful with the object's properties to create a unique string. If you want to enforce that your keys are valid, you can create a wrapper and in the get() and put() methods, add a check like:

if(!key.hasOwnProperty('toString')){
   throw(new Error('keys must override toString()'));
}

But if you are going to go thru that much work, you may as well use something other than toString(); something that makes your intent more clear. So a very simple proposal would be:

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = {};
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( key, value ) {
        // check that the key is meaningful, 
        // also will cause an error if primitive type
        if( !key.hasOwnProperty( 'hashString' ) ){
           throw( new Error( 'keys must implement hashString()' ) );
        }
        // use .hashString() because it makes the intent of the code clear
        this.hashes[ key.hashString() ] = value;
    },

    get: function( key ) {
        // check that the key is meaningful, 
        // also will cause an error if primitive type
        if( !key.hasOwnProperty( 'hashString' ) ){
           throw( new Error( 'keys must implement hashString()' ) );
        }
        // use .hashString() because it make the intent of the code clear
        return this.hashes[ key.hashString()  ];
    }
};
share|improve this answer

Inspired by @florian, here's a way where the id doesn't need JSON.stringify:

'use strict';

module.exports = HashTable;

function HashTable () {
  this.index = [];
  this.table = [];
}

HashTable.prototype = {

  constructor: HashTable,

  set: function (id, key, value) {
    var index = this.index.indexOf(id);
    if (index === -1) {
      index = this.index.length;
      this.index.push(id);
      this.table[index] = {};
    }
    this.table[index][key] = value;
  },

  get: function (id, key) {
    var index = this.index.indexOf(id);
    if (index === -1) {
      return undefined;
    }
    return this.table[index][key];
  }

};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.