Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Very new to Python and was hoping you guys could give me some help.

I have a book about The Great War, and want to count the times a country appears in the book. So far i have this:

>>> from __future__ import division 
>>> import nltk, re, pprint
>>> from urllib import urlopen
>>> url = "http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29270/29270.txt"
>>> raw = urlopen(url).read() 
>>> type(raw)
<type 'str'>
>>> len(raw)
1067008
>>> raw[:75]
'The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Story of the Great War, Volume II (of\r\nV'
>>>

Tokenization. Break up the string into words and punctuation.

>>> tokens = nltk.word_tokenize(raw)
>>> type(tokens)
<type 'list'>
>>> len(tokens)
189743
>>> tokens[:10] //vind de eerste 10 tokens
['The', 'Project', 'Gutenberg', 'EBook', 'of', 'The', 'Story', 'of', 'the', 'Great']
>>>

Correcting Beginning and Ending of book

    >>> raw.find("PART I")
    >>> 2629
    >>> raw.rfind("End of the Project Gutenberg")
    >>> 1047663
    >>> raw = raw[2629:1047663]
    >>> raw.find("PART I")
    >>> 0

I unfortunately have no idea how to implement the book into the wordcount. My ideal outcome would be something like this:

Germany 2000
United Kingdom 1500
USA 1000
Holland 50
Belgium 150

etc.

Please help!

share|improve this question
    
Thank you very much. Another question. Holland has been counted 10 times. Is it also possible to show the lines in which the word Holland is said? So the output will be 10 lines where Holland appears –  Stijn Pielage Jun 5 '12 at 10:44

1 Answer 1

Python has a builtin method to count a substring in a string.

from urllib import urlopen

url = "http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29270/29270.txt"
raw = urlopen(url).read()
raw = raw[raw.find("PART I"):raw.rfind("End of the Project Gutenberg")]

countries = ['Germany', 'United Kingdom', 'USA', 'Holland', 'Belgium']
for c in countries:
    print c, raw.count(c)

produces

Germany 117
United Kingdom 0
USA 0
Holland 10
Belgium 63

edit: eumiro is right, this doesn't work if you want to count the exact word. Use this if you want to search for the exact word:

import re
from urllib import urlopen

url = "http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29270/29270.txt"
raw = urlopen(url).read()
raw = raw[raw.find("PART I"):raw.rfind("End of the Project Gutenberg")]

for key, value in {c:len(re.findall(c + '[^A-Za-z]', raw)) for c in countries}.items():
    print key, value

edit: if you want the linenumbers:

from urllib import urlopen
import re
from collections import defaultdict

url = "http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29270/29270.txt"
raw = urlopen(url).readlines()

count = defaultdict(list)
countries = ['Germany', 'United Kingdom', 'USA', 'Holland', 'Belgium']
for c in countries:
    for nr, line in enumerate(raw):
        if re.search(c + r'[^A-Za-z]', line):
            count[c].append(nr + 1) #nr + 1 so the first line is 1 instead of 0
    print c, len(count[c]), 'lines:', count[c]
share|improve this answer
1  
USA could be a part of a longer abbreviation and counted with .count (although it is not the case in this text). –  eumiro Jun 5 '12 at 9:27
    
Thank you very much. Another question. Holland has been counted 10 times. Is it also possible to show the lines in which the word Holland is said? So the output will be 10 lines where Holland appears –  Stijn Pielage Jun 5 '12 at 10:24
    
Question nr. 2: What if i for example the words German, Germany, Germans. Can I combine these and how? –  Stijn Pielage Jun 5 '12 at 10:49
    
nr. 2: use re.findall('German[a-z]*[^A-Za-z]', raw) I will look into nr. 1... –  BrtH Jun 5 '12 at 15:18
    
nr. 1: See my answer, I updated it. –  BrtH Jun 5 '12 at 15:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.