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How can I print out the derived class name from the base class without chaining constructors all the way down. In other words is it possible to do this strictly from the base class without adding code in each derived class?

This is an example of what I got, and if there's a way I'd like to get rid of the constructor chaining.

EDIT: Ideally I am looking for something to add into the base class without having to edit all derived classes. At the moment my real code has got ~17 classes(with need for more), so something that could do the job straight from the base class would be ideal. Even if it's compiler specific (g++ or clang).

#include <iostream>

class Base {
public:
    Base(std::string id) {
            std::cout<<"Creating "<<id<<std::endl;
    }
};

class Child : Base {
public:
    Child(std::string id) : Base(id) {}
    Child() : Base(typeid(this).name()) {}
};

class GrandChild : Child {
public:
    GrandChild(std::string id) : Child(id) {}
    GrandChild() : Child(typeid(this).name()) {}
};

class GrandGrandChild : GrandChild {
public:
    GrandGrandChild(std::string id) : GrandChild(id) {}
    GrandGrandChild() : GrandChild(typeid(this).name()) {}
};



int main() {
    GrandGrandChild *A = new GrandGrandChild();
    GrandChild *B = new GrandChild();
    Child *C = new Child();

    return 0;
}

Which prints:

Creating GrandGrandChild
Creating GrandChild
Creating Child

But with compiled added prefix.

share|improve this question
1  
Use polymorphism, not RTTI, that's what polymorphism is for. – Griwes Jun 5 '12 at 9:22
    
I intend to use it purely for debugging purposes, which is why something to throw into the base class would be convenient. – NFA Jun 5 '12 at 9:27
2  
don't instantiate the objects dynamically, e.g. GrandGrandChild A; would perfectly suffice to evaluate the default constructor. – moooeeeep Jun 5 '12 at 9:42
    
I'm trying to mimic the real code I have. The above is just an example to illustrate the functionality I'm looking for. All my objects are instantiated dynamically. – NFA Jun 5 '12 at 11:02
    
I'm doing the exactly same thing that you. Debugging the process of the objects are creating. I'm wondering, what did you do at the end? – Orlando Leite Aug 6 '13 at 20:30
up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is unfortunately no easy solution.

The problem is that constructing polymorphic objects is quite complicated, at the moment you are building the Base subpart of a Child class, you are building a Base still, not a Child (because trying to access Child members would be non-sensical, they have not been built yet!)

As such, all the ways to retrieve dynamic information (known as RTTI or RunTime Type Information) are voluntarily locked down to prevent such mistake.

For symmetrical reasons, the same occur in the destructor.


Now, only the constructor and destructor are so locked down, therefore you can perfectly have a name() method that will happily return the true name of the dynamic type of the instance in all other cases:

class Base {
public:
    std::string name() const { return typeid(*this).name(); }
};

It will work... unless you invoke it from a constructor or destructor in which case it will report the static type.

Now, as far as the "bizarre" output, each implementation (compiler) is allowed to provide its own output here (and they need not even be different for different types, crazy eh!). You seem to be using gcc or clang.

There are demanglers to interpret such output, or if your program is simple enough and their interface scares you, you might simply try to parse it manually to remove the cruft. The name of the class should appear fully, it'll just be preceded with some nonsense (namespaces and numbers essentially).

share|improve this answer
    
I see. I didn't really find what I was looking for when I was googling so I was afraid it was not solvable in the way I would want it. I just believed that the information would be there for the compiler, so even if it is building the base class part it would have traversed down from the top-level so it could've retained that information. – NFA Jun 5 '12 at 11:47

you can provide an initialization function that needs to be called from each constructor.

class Base {
protected:
  Base() { init(typeid(this).name()); }
  void init(std::string id) {
    std::cout<<"Creating "<<id<<std::endl;
  }
};

You somehow need to make sure, that subsequent inits will safely supersede the changes of previous ones:

Creating P4Base
Creating P5Child
Creating P10GrandChild
Creating P15GrandGrandChild
Creating P4Base
Creating P5Child
Creating P10GrandChild
Creating P4Base
Creating P5Child

I intend to use it purely for debugging purposes, which is why something to throw into the base class would be convenient.

have you considered adding a macro to your code to print the debug output?

#ifdef DEBUG
  #define PRINT_CLASSNAME std::cout<<"Creating "<<id<<std::endl;
#else
  #define PRINT_CLASSNAME ;
#endif

You need to add it to your constructors once, but if you want to disable it (temporarily) you just undefine it?

share|improve this answer
    
This removes the constructor chaining but I still have to have code in each derived class. I was looking for some solution to just dump into the base class. It feels like this is information the compiler would know. I'd even be fine with some compiler specific code (g++/clang) if it'd help me. – NFA Jun 5 '12 at 11:01
    
@NFA it appears that you want to add some debug output functionality, that you want to remove as easy as possible when you stop need it. Please see my edit for another suggestion. – moooeeeep Jun 5 '12 at 12:12
    
@moooeeeep in your way, will appear Creating Base, Creating Child for just one class, and when seeing the output it cannot be easily differentiated from two classes been created. – Orlando Leite Aug 6 '13 at 20:39
    
@OrlandoLeite you can easily add a UUID for each instance of the base class, that you print alongside the names. – moooeeeep Aug 7 '13 at 8:23

Since you indicate this is for debugging, you can rely on virtual inheritance to avoid passing the name through all the intermediate derived classes, and instead pass it directly to the Base. Also, Base can be modified to take a template constructor to simplify things for the derived classes.

class Base {
public:
    template <typename DERIVED>
    Base (DERIVED *d) {
        std::cout << "Creating " << typeid(*d).name() << std::endl;
    }
};

class Child : virtual public Base {
public:
    Child () : Base(this) {}
};

class GrandChild : public Child, virtual public Base {
    GrandChild () : Base(this) {}
}

class GrandGrandChild : public GrandChild, virtual public Base {
    GrandGrandChild () : Base(this) {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need the virtual on the inheritance from Child and GrandChild, only on the inheritance from Base. – ymett Jun 5 '12 at 10:27
    
@ymett: thanks, edit made. – jxh Jun 5 '12 at 10:30
    
At the moment I have ~17 classes(I expect I need more) that branch out from one base class. This is why I'm looking for something I could easily add to the base class and not edit all classes individually. Maybe what I am asking is not possible... – NFA Jun 5 '12 at 11:05
    
@NFA, you can always macro it. – Griwes Jun 5 '12 at 11:08
    
Your new solution prints BaseNamex3 for me. – NFA Jun 5 '12 at 15:43

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