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In the quest to make my data more accessible, I want to store my tabulated data in a complex hash. I am trying to grow a 'HoHoHoA' as the script loops over my data. As per the guidelines in 'perldsc':

push @ { $hash{$column[$i]}{$date}{$hour} }, $data[$i];

The script compiles and runs without a problem, but doesn't not add any data to the hash:

print $hash{"Frequency Min"}{"09/07/08"}{"15"}; 

returns nothing even though the keys should exist. Running an 'exists' on the hash shows that it does not exist.

The data file that I am reading looks like this:

DATE       TIME     COLUMN1 COLUMN2 COLUMN3...    
09/06/2008 06:12:56 56.23   54.23   56.35...
09/06/2008 06:42:56 56.73   55.28   54.52...
09/06/2008 07:12:56 57.31   56.79   56.41...
09/06/2008 07:42:56 58.24   57.30   58.86...
.
.
.

I want to group together the values of each column in an array for any given date and hour, hence the three hashes for {COLUMN}, {DATE} and {HOUR}.

The resultant structure will look like this:

%monthData = (
               "COLUMN1" => {
                                    "09/06/2008" => {
                                                      "06" => [56.23,56.73...],
                                                      "07" => [57.31,58.24...]
                                                    }
                            },
               "COLUMN2" => {
                                    "09/06/2008" => {
                                                      "06" => [54.23,55.28...],
                                                      "07" => [56.79,57.30...]
                                                    }
                            },
               "COLUMN3" => {
                                    "09/06/2008" => {
                                                      "06" => [56.35,54.52...],
                                                      "07" => [56.41,58.86...]
                                                    }
                            }
             );

Take a look at my code:

use feature 'switch';
open DATAFILE, "<", $fileName or die "Unable to open $fileName !\n";

    my %monthData;

    while ( my $line = <DATAFILE> ) {

        chomp $line;

        SCANROWS: given ($row) {

            when (0) { # PROCESS HEADERS

                @headers = split /\t\t|\t/, $line;
            }

            default {

                @current = split /\t\t|\t/, $line;
                my $date =  $current[0];
                my ($hour,$min,$sec) = split /:/, $current[1];

                # TIMESTAMP FORMAT: dd/mm/yyyy\t\thh:mm:ss

                SCANLINE: for my $i (2 .. $#headers) {

                    push @{ $monthData{$headers[$i]}{$date}{$hour} }, $current[$i];

                }
            }
        }
    }

    close DATAFILE;

    foreach (@{ $monthData{"Active Power N Avg"}{"09/07/08"}{"06"} }) {
        $sum += $_;
        $count++;
    }

    $avg = $sum/$count; # $sum and $count are not initialized to begin with.
    print $avg; # hence $avg is also not defined.

Hope my need is clear enough. How can I append values to an array inside these sub-hashes?

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1  
Dump your hash using Data::Dumper here. –  VP. Jul 6 '09 at 22:42
    
Thanks, VP. Data::Dumper allows me to print my data (using print Data::Dumper->Dump( [ $hash{"Frequency Min"} ], ["09/07/08" ]);). I am assuming that I can now use this complex hash of arrays to perform some calculations. Let me know if it is otherwise. –  Zaid Jul 6 '09 at 23:13
1  
@Zaid: Data::Dumper doesn't fix anything in your code. It simply allows you to see what your data structure actually looks like. It's often very helpful when you have something complex like this. You very likely are trying to access it incorrectly (or creating something different than you think you are). VP's point, I think, was that if you print a dump of the structure here, people can help you better. Take a look at Chas's code in the answers: dump the whole hash, not just a piece of it. –  Telemachus Jul 6 '09 at 23:58
    
@Telemachus: See my post below. –  Zaid Jul 7 '09 at 0:35
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This should do it for you.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::Util qw/sum/;
sub avg { sum(@_) / @_ }

my $fileName = shift;

open my $fh, "<", $fileName
    or die "Unable to open $fileName: $!\n";

my %monthData;

chomp(my @headers = split /\t+/, <$fh>);

while (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    my %rec;
    @rec{@headers} = split /\t+/;
    my ($hour) = split /:/, $rec{TIME}, 2;

    for my $key (grep { not /^(DATE|TIME)$/ } keys %rec) {
    	push @{ $monthData{$key}{$rec{DATE}}{$hour} }, $rec{$key};
    }
}

for my $column (keys %monthData) {
    for my $date (keys %{ $monthData{$column} }) {
    	for my $hour (keys %{ $monthData{$column}{$date} }) {
    		my $avg = avg @{ $monthData{$column}{$date}{$hour} };
    		print "average of $column for $date $hour is $avg\n";
    	}
    }
}

Things to pay attention to:

  • strict and warnings pragmas
  • List::Util module to get the sum function
  • putting an array in scalar context to get the number of items in the array (in the avg function)
  • the safer three argument version of open
  • the lexical filehandle (rather than the old bareword style filehandle)
  • reading the headers first outside the loop to avoid having to have special logic inside it
  • using a hash slice to get the file data into a structured record
  • avoiding splitting the time more than necessary with the third argument to split
  • avoiding useless variables by only specifying the variable we want to catch in the list assignment
  • using grep to prevent the DATE and TIME keys from being put in %monthData
  • the nested for loops each dealing with a level in the hash
share|improve this answer
    
I think that you may have copied the OP's typo: do you want ! or $! in the call to die? –  Telemachus Jul 7 '09 at 10:34
    
@Telemachus good catch. –  Chas. Owens Jul 7 '09 at 13:49
    
@Chas: I love your avg subroutine... syntactically, it's sugar-sweet. And most of your caveats are new to me. I don't fully understand the grep function just yet. –  Zaid Jul 7 '09 at 17:16
    
The grep and map functions are a hard to wrap your head around at first, but then you realize they're just a funny way of writing a loop and it all makes sense. The basic idea with grep is that the code block is run against each item in the list, if the code block returns true then the item makes it into the list that is returned, otherwise it is discarded, so (grep { $_ < 5 } 1 .. 10) returns (6 .. 10). In the program, we wanted all of the keys but "DATE" and "TIME", so the code block is a regex /^(DATE|TIME)$/ that is negated, so it will return any string that is not "DATE" or "TIME". –  Chas. Owens Jul 7 '09 at 20:19
    
correction: so (grep { $_ < 5 } 1 .. 10) returns (1 .. 4) –  hexcoder Jun 29 '11 at 19:23
show 1 more comment

I hope the following program populates the data structure you want:

#!/usr/bin/perl                        

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

open my $fh, '<', 'input' or die $!;

my @headers;
for ( split /\t/, ~~ <$fh> ) {
    chomp;
    push @headers, $_ unless /^\t?$/;
}

my %monthData;
while (<$fh>) {
    my @line;
    for ( split /\t/ ) {
        chomp;
        push @line, $_ unless /^\t?$/;
    }

    for my $i ( 2 .. $#headers ) {
        my ($hour) = split /:/, $line[1];
        push @{ $monthData{ $headers[$i] }->{ $line[0] }->{$hour} }, $line[$i];
    }
}

print Dumper \%monthData;
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Here's how I would write a program to do that.

#! /usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010; # for say and m'(?<name>)'

use YAML;
use Data::Dump 'dump';

my(%data,%original);
while( my $line = <> ){
  next unless $line =~ m'
    ^ \s*
      (?<day>   0?[1-9] | [12][0-9] | 3[0-1] ) /
      (?<month> 0?[1-9] | 1[0-2] ) /
      (?<year>  [0-9]{4} )
      \s+
      (?<hour>   0?[1-9] | 1[0-9] | 2[0-4] ) :
      (?<minute> 0?[1-9] | [1-5][0-9] ) :
      (?<second> 0?[1-9] | [1-5][0-9] )
      \s+
      (?<columns> .* )
  'x;
  my @columns = split ' ', $+{columns};

  push @{
    $data{ $+{year}  }
         { $+{month} }
         { $+{day}   }
         { $+{hour}  }
  }, \@columns; # or [@columns]

  # If you insist on having it in that data structure you can do this:
  my $count = 1;
  my $date = "$+{day}/$+{month}/$+{year}";
  for my $column ( @columns ){
    my $col = 'COLUMN'.$count++;
    push @{ $original{$col}{$date}{$+{hour}} }, $column;
  }
}

say Dump \%data, \%original; # YAML
say dump \%data, \%original; # Data::Dump

Given this input

DATE       TIME     COLUMN1 COLUMN2 COLUMN3
09/06/2008 06:12:56 56.23   54.23   56.35
09/06/2008 06:42:56 56.73   55.28   54.52
09/06/2008 07:12:56 57.31   56.79   56.41
09/06/2008 07:42:56 58.24   57.30   58.86

Either "perl program.pl datafile" or "perl program.pl < datafile"

YAML

---
2008:
  06:
    09:
      06:
        -
          - 56.23
          - 54.23
          - 56.35
        -
          - 56.73
          - 55.28
          - 54.52
      07:
        -
          - 57.31
          - 56.79
          - 56.41
        -
          - 58.24
          - 57.30
          - 58.86
---
COLUMN1:
  09/06/2008:
    06:
      - 56.23
      - 56.73
    07:
      - 57.31
      - 58.24
COLUMN2:
  09/06/2008:
    06:
      - 54.23
      - 55.28
    07:
      - 56.79
      - 57.30
COLUMN3:
  09/06/2008:
    06:
      - 56.35
      - 54.52
    07:
      - 56.41
      - 58.86

Data::Dump

(
  {
    2008 => {
          "06" => {
                "09" => {
                      "06" => [["56.23", "54.23", "56.35"], ["56.73", "55.28", "54.52"]],
                      "07" => [["57.31", "56.79", "56.41"], ["58.24", "57.30", "58.86"]],
                    },
              },
        },
  },
  {
    COLUMN1 => {
                 "09/06/2008" => { "06" => ["56.23", "56.73"], "07" => ["57.31", "58.24"] },
               },
    COLUMN2 => {
                 "09/06/2008" => { "06" => ["54.23", "55.28"], "07" => ["56.79", "57.30"] },
               },
    COLUMN3 => {
                 "09/06/2008" => { "06" => ["56.35", "54.52"], "07" => ["56.41", "58.86"] },
               },
  },
)
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