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Starting from an issue I had on my code, I've created this simple app to recreate the problem:

private async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Task task = Task.Run(() =>
    {
        TestWork();
    });
    try
    {
        await task;
        MessageBox.Show("Exception uncaught!");
    }
    catch (Exception) { MessageBox.Show("Exception caught!"); }
}

private async void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Task task = TestWork();
    try
    {
        await task;
        MessageBox.Show("Exception uncaught!");
    }
    catch (Exception) { MessageBox.Show("Exception caught!"); }
}

private async Task TestWork()
{
    throw new Exception();
}

The code for button1_Click will not catch the exception. I've verified that this is because I'm not awaiting the TestWork async method. Indeed I've a warning message from Visual Studio that inform me I'm not awaiting the method. However the solution compile and I'm scared this can happen somewhere else in my code if I use extensively the async/await. So can you please explain the reason and peraphs give some golden rule to avoid it?

P.S.: It works if in the code for button1_Click I write:

Task task = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    await TestWork();
});
share|improve this question
1  
Another way to write the code for button1_Click correctly is Task.Run(() => TestWork()). –  svick Jun 5 '12 at 10:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your first button1_Click implementation, you are ignoring the result of the Task returned by TestWork.

In your modified version, the await checks for an Exception and propogates it for you to catch.

In fact, the compiler warning you are seeing is normally important. If TestWork actually ran something on a different thread, then because the wrapper Task in your first implementation doesn't wait for TestWork to complete, it would just complete itself as soon as TestWork had started.

Writing it this way makes it clearer:

Task task = Task.Run( () =>
    {
        Task t = TestWork();
        // ignore t
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
@Adriano Just because a method is async doesn't mean it will run on the thread pool! In fact, there are two reasons why TestWork() won't run there: 1. It doesn't contain await, which means it will run completely synchronously. 2. It runs on the UI thread, which means any code after await would run back on the UI thread, not on the pool. –  svick Jun 5 '12 at 10:53
    
I'm not sure having unused variable is clearer, you need a comment in both cases. –  svick Jun 5 '12 at 10:54
    
@Adriano You're completely wrong. That's not how async behaves at all, I think you should read about it more first, before making claims like this. If you don't believe me or someone from the C# team, try it out yourself. –  svick Jun 5 '12 at 11:32
    
@svick you're right (who said I don't believe you?), thank you for the clarifying link!!! –  Adriano Repetti Jun 5 '12 at 11:45

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