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Assume let the value of the variable a be 42,

b=18+$a
The value of b should be 60

But I'm not getting the value 60. Instead it's printing 18+42. How can i do it ?

New Query :

grep -F "$name" -A1000 filename | sed -n '1p;19p;24p'

Assume let a=10,b=20,c=30.In the above grep command can i use '$ap;$bp;$cp' instead of '1p;19p;24p' ?

Another thing, I've given as -A1000. Which implies that starting from 1p it considers till 1000 line , right ? I need to search throughout file without giving the number. Ho

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2  
In which shell? –  Johnsyweb Jun 5 '12 at 10:24
    
It's bash. Thank U. –  Jackie James Jun 5 '12 at 10:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Bash:

b=$((18+a))
echo "value of b is $b"

or

let b=18+a
echo "value of b is $b"
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@ Prince : Thank U. By the way do u remember this grep -F "$name" -A37 filename| sed -n '1p;19p;24p' ;which u've guided me yesterday ? In the above command can i mention '$ap;$bp;$cp' instead of '1p;19p;24p' ? –  Jackie James Jun 5 '12 at 10:46
1  
Inside $(()) and on the right side of a let statement the use of the dollar sign is not required. E.g. let b=18+a would work just as well. –  Sorpigal Jun 5 '12 at 10:59
    
@JackieJames: Variables don't expand inside single-quoted strings. In addition, bash would not see "A variable named a followed by the letter p," for example, instead i would see "A variable named ap," which is not what you mean. You should double-quote the expansion and include curly braces for clarity: "${a}p;${b}p;${c}p" –  Sorpigal Jun 5 '12 at 11:01
    
@ Prince : grep -F "$name" -A1000 filename | sed -n '1p;19p;24p' Assume let a=10,b=20,c=30.In the above grep command can i use '$ap;$bp;$cp' instead of '1p;19p;24p' ? Another thing, I've given as -A1000. Which implies that starting from 1p it considers till 1000 line , right ? I need to search throughout file without giving the number. –  Jackie James Jun 5 '12 at 11:16
    
Please help me prince. –  Jackie James Jun 5 '12 at 11:16

Any mathematical operation in Bash involves the use of $(())

So, for addition, you would do :-

b=$((18 + a))

Notice that the '$' before a is not required. Some more examples of mathematical operations in Bash are :-

a=$((17+1))
b=$((100-a))
c=$((a*b))
d=$((c/b))
echo $((10 * 1024 * 1024)) # Echoes the number bytes in 10 MB
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