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I am trying to figure out memory-efficient AND functional ways to process a large scale of data using strings in scala. I have read many things about lazy collections and have seen quite a bit of code examples. However, I run into "GC overhead exceeded" or "Java heap space" issues again and again.

Often the problem is that I try to construct a lazy collection, but evaluate each new element when I append it to the growing collection (I don't now any other way to do so incrementally). Of course, I could try something like initializing an initial lazy collection first and and yield the collection holding the desired values by applying the ressource-critical computations with map or so, but often I just simply do not know the exact size of the final collection a priori to initial that lazy collection.

Maybe you could help me by giving me hints or explanations on how to improve following code as an example, which splits a FASTA (definition below) formatted file into two separate files according to the rule that odd sequence pairs belong to one file and even ones to aother one ("separation of strands"). The "most" straight-forward way to do so would be in a imperative way by looping through the lines and printing into the corresponding files via open file streams (and this of course works excellent). However, I just don't enjoy the style of reassigning to variables holding header and sequences, thus the following example code uses (tail-)recursion, and I would appreciate to have found a way to maintain a similar design without running into ressource problems!

The example works perfectly for small files, but already with files at around ~500mb the code will fail with the standard JVM setups. I do want to process files of "arbitray" size, say 10-20gb or so.

val fileName = args(0)
val in = io.Source.fromFile(fileName) getLines

type itType = Iterator[String]
type sType = Stream[(String, String)]

def getFullSeqs(ite: itType) = {
    //val metaChar = ">"
    val HeadPatt = "(^>)(.+)" r
    val SeqPatt  = "([\\w\\W]+)" r
    @annotation.tailrec
    def rec(it: itType, out: sType = Stream[(String, String)]()): sType = 
        if (it hasNext) it next match  {
            case HeadPatt(_,header) =>
                // introduce new header-sequence pair
                rec(it, (header, "") #:: out)
            case SeqPatt(seq) =>
                val oldVal = out head
                // concat subsequences
                val newStream = (oldVal._1, oldVal._2 + seq) #:: out.tail    
                rec(it, newStream)
            case _ =>
                println("something went wrong my friend, oh oh oh!"); Stream[(String, String)]()                
        } else out
    rec(ite)    
}

def printStrands(seqs: sType) {
   import java.io.PrintWriter
   import java.io.File
   def printStrand(seqse: sType, strand: Int) {
        // only use sequences of one strand 
        val indices =  List.tabulate(seqs.size/2)(_*2 + strand - 1).view
        val p = new PrintWriter(new File(fileName + "." + strand))
        indices foreach { i =>
              p.print(">" + seqse(i)._1 + "\n" + seqse(i)._2 + "\n")
        }; p.close
       println("Done bro!")
   }
   List(1,2).par foreach (s => printStrand(seqs, s))
}

printStrands(getFullSeqs(in))

Three questions arise for me:

A) Let's assume one needs to maintain a large data structure obtained by processing the initial iterator you get from getLines like in my getFullSeqs method (note the different size of in and the output of getFullSeqs), because transformations on the whole(!) data is required repeatedly, because one does not know which part of the data one will require at any step. My example might not be the best, but how to do so? Is it possible at all??

B) What when the desired data structure is not inherently lazy, say one would like to store the (header -> sequence) pairs into a Map()? Would you wrap it in a lazy collection?

C) My implementation of constructing the stream might reverse the order of the inputted lines. When calling reverse, all elements will be evaluated (in my code, they already are, so this is the actual problem). Is there any way to post-process "from behind" in a lazy fashion? I know of reverseIterator, but is this already the solution, or will this not actually evaluate all elements first, too (as I would need to call it on a list)? One could construct the stream with newVal #:: rec(...), but I would lose tail-recursion then, wouldn't I?

So what I basically need is to add elements to a collection, which are not evaluated by the process of adding. So lazy val elem = "test"; elem :: lazyCollection is not what I am looking for.

EDIT: I have also tried using by-name parameter for the stream argument in rec .

Thank you so much for your attention and time, I really appreciate any help (again :) ).

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

FASTA is defined as a sequential set of sequences delimited by a single header line. A header is defined as a line starting with ">". Every line below the header is called part of the sequence associated with the header. A sequence ends when a new header is present. Every header is unique. Example:

>HEADER1
abcdefg
>HEADER2
hijklmn
opqrstu
>HEADER3
vwxyz
>HEADER4
zyxwv

Thus, sequence 2 is twice as big as seq 1. My program would split that file into a file A containing

>HEADER1
abcdefg
>HEADER3
vwxyz

and a second file B containing

>HEADER2
hijklmn
opqrstu
>HEADER4
zyxwv

The input file is assumed to consist of an even number of header-sequence pairs.

share|improve this question
1  
pastebin.com/bvaKiA3e Just for completeness, the imperative and very concise way of doing exactly the same - just it also works with unlimited size of files (however, this is only the solution in the particular example, but as soon as I need to transform the whole data, I will into the same memory problems) – Wayne Jhukie Jun 5 '12 at 11:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The key to working with really large data structures is to hold in memory only that which is critical to perform whatever operation you need. So, in your case, that's

  • Your input file
  • Your two output files
  • The current line of text

and that's it. In some cases you can need to store information such as how long a sequence is; in such events, you build the data structures in a first pass and use them on a second pass. Let's suppose, for example, that you decide that you want to write three files: one for even records, one for odd, and one for entries where the total length is less than 300 nucleotides. You would do something like this (warning--it compiles but I never ran it, so it may not actually work):

final def findSizes(
  data: Iterator[String], sz: Map[String,Long] = Map(),
  currentName: String = "", currentSize: Long = 0
): Map[String,Long] = {
  def currentMap = if (currentName != "") sz + (currentName->currentSize) else sz
  if (!data.hasNext) currentMap
  else {
    val s = data.next
    if (s(0) == '>') findSizes(data, currentMap, s, 0)
    else findSizes(data, sz, currentName, currentSize + s.length)
  }
}

Then, for processing, you use that map and pass through again:

import java.io._
final def writeFiles(
  source: Iterator[String], targets: Array[PrintWriter],
  sizes: Map[String,Long], count: Int = -1, which: Int = 0
) {
  if (!source.hasNext) targets.foreach(_.close)
  else {
    val s = source.next
    if (s(0) == '>') {
      val w = if (sizes.get(s).exists(_ < 300)) 2 else (count+1)%2
      targets(w).println(s)
      writeFiles(source, targets, sizes, count+1, w)
    }
    else {
      targets(which).println(s)
      writeFiles(source, targets, sizes, count, which)
    }
  }
}

You then use Source.fromFile(f).getLines() twice to create your iterators, and you're all set. Edit: in some sense this is the key step, because this is your "lazy" collection. However, it's not important just because it doesn't read all memory in immediately ("lazy"), but because it doesn't store any previous strings either!

More generally, Scala can't help you that much from thinking carefully about what information you need to have in memory and what you can fetch off disk as needed. Lazy evaluation can sometimes help, but there's no magic formula because you can easily express the requirement to have all your data in memory in a lazy way. Scala can't interpret your commands to access memory as, secretly, instructions to fetch stuff off the disk instead. (Well, not unless you write a library to cache results from disk which does exactly that.)

share|improve this answer
    
I actually used similar approaches (though not as consistent as your example may be, as I was messing around with indices), but I felt so dumb calling getLines again and again knowing the examples of inifnite lists via streams (fib example and so on), whose elements are only evaluated when needed. I still need to get this straight in my head. I got your point, many thanks for your explanations! I really appreciate. Last question: Do you have any hint for me on how to actually build up lazy collections iteratively? Or is this again the same point as with these examples. – Wayne Jhukie Jun 5 '12 at 13:40
    
@WayneJhukie - Infinite lists via streams only work if you can discard the early part of the stream at which point you usually can use iterators instead. Streams are extremely powerful if you need just a little bit of history, but it can be tricky to ensure that you do not hold on to a copy of the head of the stream. Try with iterators first! Since they don't hold state, you're less likely to run into trouble. If you require held state, then consider either using streams, or Iterator.duplicate (if you will always advance both, as the difference is stored). – Rex Kerr Jun 5 '12 at 14:06

One could construct the stream with newVal #:: rec(...), but I would lose tail-recursion then, wouldn't I?

Actually, no.

So, here's the thing... with your present tail recursion, you fill ALL of the Stream with values. Yes, Stream is lazy, but you are computing all of the elements, stripping it of any laziness.

Now say you do newVal #:: rec(...). Would you lose tail recursion? No. Why? Because you are not recursing. How come? Well, Stream is lazy, so it won't evaluate rec(...).

And that's the beauty of it. Once you do it that way, getFullSeqs returns on the first interaction, and only compute the "recursion" when printStrands asks for it. Unfortunately, that won't work as is...

The problem is that you are constantly modifying the Stream -- that's not how you use a Stream. With Stream, you always append to it. Don't keep "rewriting" the Stream.

Now, there are three other problems I could readily identify with printStrands. First, it calls size on seqs, which will cause the whole Stream to be processed, losing lazyness. Never call size on a Stream. Second, you call apply on seqse, accessing it by index. Never call apply on a Stream (or List) -- that's highly inefficient. It's O(n), which makes your inner loop O(n^2) -- yes, quadratic on the number of headers in the input file! Finally, printStrands keeps a reference to seqs throughout the execution of printStrand, preventing processing elements from being garbage collected.

So, here's a first approximation:

def inputStreams(fileName: String): (Stream[String], Stream[String]) = {
  val in = (io.Source fromFile fileName).getLines.toStream
  val SeqPatt = "^[^>]".r
  def demultiplex(s: Stream[String], skip: Boolean): Stream[String] = {
    if (s.isEmpty) Stream.empty
    else if (skip) demultiplex(s.tail dropWhile (SeqPatt findFirstIn _ nonEmpty), skip = false)
         else s.head #:: (s.tail takeWhile (SeqPatt findFirstIn _ nonEmpty)) #::: demultiplex(s.tail dropWhile (SeqPatt findFirstIn _ nonEmpty), skip = true)
  }
  (demultiplex(in, skip = false), demultiplex(in, skip = true))
}

The problem with the above, and I'm showing that code just to further guide in the issues of lazyness, is that the instant you do this:

val (a, b) = inputStreams(fileName)

You'll keep a reference to the head of both streams, which prevents garbage collecting them. You can't keep a reference to them, so you have to consume them as soon as you get them, without ever storing them in a "val" or "lazy val". A "var" might do, but it would be tricky to handle. So let's try this instead:

def inputStreams(fileName: String): Vector[Stream[String]] = {
  val in = (io.Source fromFile fileName).getLines.toStream
  val SeqPatt = "^[^>]".r
  def demultiplex(s: Stream[String], skip: Boolean): Stream[String] = {
    if (s.isEmpty) Stream.empty
    else if (skip) demultiplex(s.tail dropWhile (SeqPatt findFirstIn _ nonEmpty), skip = false)
         else s.head #:: (s.tail takeWhile (SeqPatt findFirstIn _ nonEmpty)) #::: demultiplex(s.tail dropWhile (SeqPatt findFirstIn _ nonEmpty), skip = true)
  }
  Vector(demultiplex(in, skip = false), demultiplex(in, skip = true))
}

inputStreams(fileName).zipWithIndex.par.foreach { 
  case (stream, strand) => 
    val p = new PrintWriter(new File("FASTA" + "." + strand))
    stream foreach p.println
    p.close
}

That still doesn't work, because stream inside inputStreams works as a reference, keeping the whole stream in memory even while they are printed.

So, having failed again, what do I recommend? Keep it simple.

def in = (scala.io.Source fromFile fileName).getLines.toStream
def inputStream(in: Stream[String], strand: Int = 1): Stream[(String, Int)] = {
  if (in.isEmpty) Stream.empty
  else if (in.head startsWith ">") (in.head, 1 - strand) #:: inputStream(in.tail, 1 - strand)
       else                        (in.head, strand) #:: inputStream(in.tail, strand)
}
val printers = Array.tabulate(2)(i => new PrintWriter(new File("FASTA" + "." + i)))
inputStream(in) foreach {
  case (line, strand) => printers(strand) println line
}
printers foreach (_.close)

Now this won't keep anymore in memory than necessary. I still think it's too complex, however. This can be done more easily like this:

def in = (scala.io.Source fromFile fileName).getLines
val printers = Array.tabulate(2)(i => new PrintWriter(new File("FASTA" + "." + i)))
def printStrands(in: Iterator[String], strand: Int = 1) {
  if (in.hasNext) {
    val next = in.next
    if (next startsWith ">") { 
      printers(1 - strand).println(next)
      printStrands(in, 1 - strand)
    } else {
      printers(strand).println(next)
      printStrands(in, strand)
    }
  }
}
printStrands(in)
printers foreach (_.close)

Or just use a while loop instead of recursion.

Now, to the other questions:

B) It might make sense to do so while reading it, so that you do not have to keep two copies of the data: the Map and a Seq.

C) Don't reverse a Stream -- you'll lose all of its laziness.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic!Thx so much for the time you spent on your explanations and the code examples!+1. I admit my example was not the best, as the file printing was just to illustrate a possible task after the preprocessing step I was actually interested in. Just to clarify: which stream inside inputStreamdo you mean exactly and where does this differ from the next code (I mean the first and second one not "failing")? And, in your opinion, is that first "the" way of constructing a lazy collection from scratch from other data (say if I would like to implement my own version of getLines)? – Wayne Jhukie Jun 13 '12 at 17:56
    
@WayneJhukie Yeah, re-reading I can see it's not clear. I meant the stream declared by this line: case (stream, strand) =>. The main difference to the next code is that the next code doesn't have nested foreach. The first case has an outer foreach which simply select the two input streams. The second case does away with multiple streams, so you only have one stream to iterate through, which makes it possible to deallocate data. Note that inputStream in that example is a def, so there's no pointer to the head of the stream. – Daniel C. Sobral Jun 13 '12 at 19:20
    
@WayneJhukie And, yes, I think that first working example shows practical way of building lazy collections. Mind you, when it comes to Input/Output, the functional solution is Iteratees. Iteratees is an area of active development in Scala right now: Blue Eyes, Scalaz and Play all have a version of it. – Daniel C. Sobral Jun 13 '12 at 19:24

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