Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I went upon a very strange behavior (to me) :

    int generate_scenario_one_pass(FILE *out, double freq_mhz) {
        unsigned int d_freq, d_freq_test;
        d_freq              = (int)(freq_mhz * 20);
        d_freq_test         = (int)(float)(freq_mhz * 20);
        printf("when freq_mhz = %.1f, d_freq = 0x%04X, d_freq_test = 0x%04X\n", freq_mhz, d_freq, d_freq_test);
    }

The whole code is not here, but it's not relevant. This function is called several times with increasing values, starting from 2110.0 with an increment of 0.1.

when freq_mhz = 2110.0, d_freq = 0xA4D8, d_freq_test = 0xA4D8
when freq_mhz = 2110.1, d_freq = 0xA4DA, d_freq_test = 0xA4DA
when freq_mhz = 2110.2, d_freq = 0xA4DC, d_freq_test = 0xA4DC
when freq_mhz = 2110.3, d_freq = 0xA4DD, d_freq_test = 0xA4DE

At the last iteration, d_freq is wrong! But d_freq_test has the correct value. So my issue was solved by casting from double to float, then from float to int. I wanted to know why.

This was compiled using MSVC++ 6.0 on a x86 CPU.

share|improve this question
2  
If you're only working at precision to 10ths, and you're multiplying by 20... why not just take an int representing the 10ths, e.g. 21100 and multiply by 2? –  FatalError Jun 5 '12 at 11:33
    
I'm working with a microchip that has this value hardcoded as 20 times the actual value. I can't change that, it's hardware. –  Benoit Duffez Jun 5 '12 at 11:35
1  
The point is you get the same result. You still get 20*freq, because it's 2*(freq*10), but freq*10 is an integer, so you save yourself the hassle of dealing with issues like this. –  FatalError Jun 5 '12 at 11:36
    
The actual precision of the chip is 0.05, and for my test I just need it to go every 0.1 –  Benoit Duffez Jun 5 '12 at 11:40
1  
Il'll try to rephrase @FatalError idea: why don't you use fixed point (i.e. an int with an implicit divisor of 10 or 20 or whatever you need) instead of floating point. It is usually more predictable as long as your divisor can stay the same for the whole program. (Floating point can be considered as the case where the divisor is different for each value and is a power of 2). –  AProgrammer Jun 5 '12 at 11:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are many numbers that cannot be represented exactly as a floating-point number - and 0.1 is among them (it will be rounded to the closest number that can be represented - something along the lines of 0.0999999999999998). When using double, 2110.3 happens to be represented by a number that is slightly smaller than 2110.3, thus giving the "wrong" result when you multiply by 20 and cast to int (which will round down), while 2110.3 as a float will be represented by a number that is slightly bigger than 2110.3, thus giving the expected outcome.

share|improve this answer
    
"floating-point numbers are inherently inaccurate" - this is somewhat misleading... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 5 '12 at 11:32
    
@OliCharlesworth: Better now? –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jun 5 '12 at 11:36
    
Yes indeed!.... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 5 '12 at 11:37
    
This best explains the problem I faced, +1 and I'll accept when I'll be able to. Check also my answer that shows the solution: stackoverflow.com/a/10896637/334493 –  Benoit Duffez Jun 5 '12 at 11:45

When you convert from double to int, you get truncation.

The value of freq_mhz*20 at 2110.3 is represented by 0x40E49BFFFFFFFFFF - which is 42207.9999999999927240423858166. When you truncate that to an int, the .999999 gets chopped off and you get 42207 (or 0xA4DD - why choose to represent these in hex?)

If you convert to a float in the meantime, you get a rounding operation performed. What you actually want to do is explicitly call round on the value and then convert to an int.

share|improve this answer
    
From the frequencies involved, I'd be willing to be that the OP is generating register values for a hardware PLL or RF synth or something for a wireless transceiver (UMTS, probably). Hence hex is a natural representation to choose. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 5 '12 at 11:49
    
@OliCharlesworth: Agreed, but in terms of "explaining the question most obviously", decimal numbers make more sense (IMHO :) –  Martin Thompson Jun 5 '12 at 11:59
    
@OliCharlesworth: that is entirely correct, I'm driving a RFIC chip for UMTS/LTE. –  Benoit Duffez Jun 5 '12 at 12:17
    
@MartinThompson: the value x20 doesn't make any sense, hence the hex notation. –  Benoit Duffez Jun 5 '12 at 12:17
    
@Bicou: Sorry, that comment wasn't meant to wind anyone up - all I meant was that the question you have is not dependent on your application. It's easier to see what's going on comparing a double with a decimal integer, as they are both displayed in the same base. –  Martin Thompson Jun 5 '12 at 13:12

Actually my double casting was not the solution.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int d_freq, d_freq_test;
    double freq_mhz = 2110.0;
    double step = 0.1;

    while (freq_mhz < 2111.0) {
        d_freq = (int)(freq_mhz * 20.0);
        d_freq_test = (int)(float)(freq_mhz * 20.0);
        printf("freq: %.1f, d_freq: 0x%04X, d_freq_test: 0x%04X\n", freq_mhz, d_freq, d_freq_test);
        freq_mhz += step;
    }

    return 0;
}

this produces (wrong):

freq: 2110.0, d_freq: 0xA4D8, d_freq_test: 0xA4D8
freq: 2110.1, d_freq: 0xA4DA, d_freq_test: 0xA4DA
freq: 2110.2, d_freq: 0xA4DC, d_freq_test: 0xA4DC
freq: 2110.3, d_freq: 0xA4DD, d_freq_test: 0xA4DD <-- :(
freq: 2110.4, d_freq: 0xA4DF, d_freq_test: 0xA4DF
freq: 2110.5, d_freq: 0xA4E1, d_freq_test: 0xA4E1
freq: 2110.6, d_freq: 0xA4E3, d_freq_test: 0xA4E3
freq: 2110.7, d_freq: 0xA4E5, d_freq_test: 0xA4E5
freq: 2110.8, d_freq: 0xA4E7, d_freq_test: 0xA4E7
freq: 2110.9, d_freq: 0xA4E9, d_freq_test: 0xA4E9
freq: 2111.0, d_freq: 0xA4EB, d_freq_test: 0xA4EB

While this code :

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int d_freq, d_freq_test;
    double freq_mhz = 2110.0;
    double step = 0.1;

    while (freq_mhz < 2111.0) {
        d_freq = (int)(freq_mhz * 20.0);
        d_freq_test = (int)(float)(freq_mhz * 20.0 + 0.5);
        printf("freq: %.1f, d_freq: 0x%04X, d_freq_test: 0x%04X\n", freq_mhz, d_freq, d_freq_test);
        freq_mhz += step;
    }

    return 0;
}

produces:

freq: 2110.0, d_freq: 0xA4D8, d_freq_test: 0xA4D8
freq: 2110.1, d_freq: 0xA4DA, d_freq_test: 0xA4DA
freq: 2110.2, d_freq: 0xA4DC, d_freq_test: 0xA4DC
freq: 2110.3, d_freq: 0xA4DD, d_freq_test: 0xA4DE <-- :)
freq: 2110.4, d_freq: 0xA4DF, d_freq_test: 0xA4E0
freq: 2110.5, d_freq: 0xA4E1, d_freq_test: 0xA4E2
freq: 2110.6, d_freq: 0xA4E3, d_freq_test: 0xA4E4
freq: 2110.7, d_freq: 0xA4E5, d_freq_test: 0xA4E6
freq: 2110.8, d_freq: 0xA4E7, d_freq_test: 0xA4E8
freq: 2110.9, d_freq: 0xA4E9, d_freq_test: 0xA4EA
freq: 2111.0, d_freq: 0xA4EB, d_freq_test: 0xA4EC

which is right.

So it was indeed rounding issue, a precision issue, which was solved by adding 0.5 to the result of the x20 multiplication.

share|improve this answer
    
That's one way of coping. –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 5 '12 at 11:42
    
you've still got the (float) cast in there, so what makes you think the +0.5 helps? –  Martin Thompson Jun 5 '12 at 11:57
    
@MartinThompson: That will cause the truncation to do a round-to-nearest, rather than a floor (at least for positive values). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 5 '12 at 12:07
    
@MartinThompson: casting using (int) or (int)(float) yields the same result. –  Benoit Duffez Jun 5 '12 at 12:15
    
@OliCharlesworth: yes, my point was that this code still has the (int)(float) in it which causes (AIUI) rounding to happen anyway, so the +0.5 isn't actually being tested. –  Martin Thompson Jun 5 '12 at 13:16

Because 0.1 cannot be exactly represented in binary floating-point. What you are seeing are approximations, exacerbated by the truncation that casting causes, and the rounding that printf causes.

One way to solve this is to explicitly round instead of truncating when casting to int (you could use round()).

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter: care to comment? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 5 '12 at 11:44
    
Someone who think precision = accuracy? Got me as well. –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 5 '12 at 11:59

a tenth cannot be represented in binary. It's like a 1/3 in base ten. The more places after decimal point you get the closer you are but you can't get there. There are all sorts of coping strategies but basicall if you want exact representation, floating point formats won't do it. Fixed point (decimal) formats are required.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 5 '12 at 11:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.