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I'm trying to make program run. When I try Hello World in win32 project/.cpp file I get bunch of errors

1>------ Build started: Project: HelloWorld3, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------ 1>Compiling... 1>hello.cpp 1>...\projects\helloworld3\helloworld3\hello.cpp(7) : error C2065: 'cout' : undeclared identifier 1>...\projects\helloworld3\helloworld3\hello.cpp(7) : error C2001: newline in constant 1>...\projects\helloworld3\helloworld3\hello.cpp(8) : error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'return' 1>Build log was saved at "file:/...\Projects\HelloWorld3\HelloWorld3\Debug\BuildLog.htm" 1>HelloWorld3 - 3 error(s), 0 warning(s)

#include <iostream>

int main()
{


cout <<"Hello World!<<endl;
return 0;
}
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If you get a chance, you should really edit your question to give it a better subject line. "Visual C++" could mean anything at all. That won't make people eager to read it. –  John Saunders Jul 6 '09 at 23:22
    
But, RichieHindle, I was hoping to give him 15 minutes or so to maybe do it on his own... –  John Saunders Jul 6 '09 at 23:27
    
@John: Sorry, you're quite right, I should have given ee1234 more of a chance to do it. –  RichieHindle Jul 6 '09 at 23:30
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5 Answers 5

cout is in the namespace "std", so you have two options:

  1. prefix its use with std

    std::cout << "Hello World" << std::endl;

  2. declare that you are using the namespace std

    using namespace std;

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I did it, but now I get : error C2065: 'endl' : undeclared identifier error –  ee1234 Jul 6 '09 at 23:26
    
endl is also in the namespace std... I updated my answer to reflect that. Try using #2 instead, put "using namespace std;" near the top of your file and you can avoid prefixing everything with "std::" –  Alex Black Jul 6 '09 at 23:27
    
It worked. Thank You. Can someone recommend me video training or a book? –  ee1234 Jul 6 '09 at 23:46
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You need to use std::cout and std::endl rather than cout and endl, or do this after the #include:

using namespace std;

The using clause makes your code more succinct, but in a large program it can be hard to keep track of where the names are coming from, so it can be better to be use the more verbose but more explicit std::cout / std::endl.

You're also missing a closing quote here:

cout <<"Hello World!<<endl;

You should have:

cout << "Hello World!" << endl;
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ee1234. Seeing as this was likely your very first C++ program, go have a look at CPlusPlus.com it has a pretty straightforward and basic tutorial. That is exactly where I started when I first jumped into c++. As far as good books go, well just do a search on SO for 'C++ Books' and you should have a plethora of good posts talking about appropriate beginner->advanced books.

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1>...\projects\helloworld3\helloworld3\hello.cpp(7) : error C2065: 'cout' : undeclared identifier

What this is saying is that it doesn't know what cout is. In C++ names can be in namespaces. In the case of cout it is in the namespace std. You can tell the compiler to look there in 2 ways:

  • with the line, using namespace std; this tells the compiler to bring in all the names in the namespace std into the current one.
  • by using the scope resolution operator ::. as in std::cout Here you are telling the compiler exactly where to find the name.

1>...\projects\helloworld3\helloworld3\hello.cpp(7) : error C2001: newline in constant

This error says that the compiler is looking at a constant, in this case a string, and it found a newline where it didn't expect one. This is almost always a missing end quote.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hello World!" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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Since cout is present within the standard namespace, you should either include

using namespace std;

at the start of your code, under your includes, or use std:: in front of every function call. When placing an opening quote for a string, you should always include a closing quote aswell. This results in

std::cout << "Hello World!" << std::endl;

Another way to write this would be:

std::cout << "Hello World!\n";

The \n results in a new line feed.

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