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What is the purpose of the following declaration?

struct test
{
     int field1;
     int field2[0];
};
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2  
Note: if you can use C99, use struct test { int field1; int field2[]; }; instead. That's portable across all C99 (and later) compilers. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 5 '12 at 12:19
2  
And to add a searchable term to it, such a beast is called "flexible array member". –  Jens Gustedt Jun 5 '12 at 12:34

3 Answers 3

It's a zero size array, which is a useful GCC extension if you don't have C99.

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That's simply a 0 length array. According to http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Zero-Length.html:

Zero-length arrays are allowed in GNU C. They are very useful as the last element of a structure which is really a header for a variable-length object:

 struct line {
   int length;
   char contents[0];
 };

 struct line *thisline = (struct line *)
 malloc (sizeof (struct line) + this_length);
 thisline->length = this_length;
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3  
I know you copied this from the GNU site so it isn't your fault but this_length isn't defined anywhere. –  Hunter McMillen Jun 5 '12 at 12:22
    
@Hunter McMillen: Well it's just a snippet. You'd have to add a lot more things than that for the code to compile anyway. I assume it's just some value you want to assign to the lengh member. –  Tudor Jun 5 '12 at 12:24

It's for encapsulation.

It is used to create an interface without knowing any details. Following is a simple example.

In test.h (interface), it shows that there is a struct test_t which has two fields. And it has three function, first one is to create the structure. set_x is to store some integer into the structure. get_x is to get the stored integer.

So, when can we store x?

The person who is responsible for implement (test.c) will declare another structure which contains x. And play some tricks in "test_create" to malloc this structure.

Once the interface and the implement have been done. The application (main.c) can set/get x without knowing where it is.

test.h

struct test_t
{
    int field1;
    int field2[0];
};

struct test_t *test_create();
void set_x(struct test_t *thiz, int x);
int get_x(struct test_t *thiz);

test.c

#include "test.h"
struct test_priv_t {
    int x;
};

struct test_t *test_create()
{
    return (struct test_t*)malloc(sizeof(struct test_t) + sizeof(struct test_priv_t);
}


void set_x(struct test_t *thiz, int x)
{
    struct test_priv_t *priv = (struct test_priv_t *)thiz->field2;
}

int get_x(struct test_t *thiz)
{
    struct test_priv_t *priv = (struct test_priv_t *)thiz->field2;
}

main.c

#include "test.h"

int main()
{
    struct test_t *test = test_create();
    set_x(test, 1);
    printf("%d\n", get_x(test));
}
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