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Is main() really start of a C++ program?

Is possible to call my function before program's startup? How can i do this work in C++ or C?

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15  
Is there a compelling reason you cannot just make the call immediately after entering main() but before any of your other code executes? Why is pre-main() a requirement? –  Omaha Jun 5 '12 at 12:46
3  
why not call this function at main begin? –  Alessandro Pezzato Jun 5 '12 at 12:47
2  
What is it that you want to do? If you further explain your actual problem you might get suggestions on the design (rather than the technique). While you can do what you ask for, I would rethink a design that depends on this. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 5 '12 at 12:48
3  
The answers you got will do what you want but be aware that order of evaluation isn't well defined so if you have two of them there is no telling which will run first, so making one of them depend on the results of the other is bad things waiting to happen. This bug is so common it has its own name: the static order initialization fiasco. –  stonemetal Jun 5 '12 at 12:52
1  
I was reading about logger and I thought it was usefu know how start a method before the program starts. –  Nick Jun 5 '12 at 12:52
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marked as duplicate by Nawaz, Lundin, zzzzBov, jcolebrand, Donal Fellows Jun 5 '12 at 15:28

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5 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You can have a global variable or a static class member.

1) static class member

//BeforeMain.h
class BeforeMain
{
    static bool foo;
};

//BeforeMain.cpp
#include "BeforeMain.h"
bool BeforeMain::foo = foo();

2) global variable

bool b = foo();
int main()
{
}

Note this link - http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.14 - posted by Lundin.

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4  
Note: the class itself is spurious here, just building a global (whatever) is sufficient. –  Matthieu M. Jun 5 '12 at 13:15
2  
Just be aware of this subtle bug. The function called cannot be allowed to depend on any static resources. You should write it as you would write a re-entrant function. –  Lundin Jun 5 '12 at 13:44
    
I believe this to be technically incorrect. AFAIR the function is not required to be called before main and can be delayed until b is needed. Or maybe it was just the observable state had to be the same. –  Pubby Jun 5 '12 at 15:46
    
@Pubby I believe that actually the order is enforced, but granted I'm not going to look for the quote in the standard. :) –  Luchian Grigore Jun 5 '12 at 17:29
    
An additional warning, if that code ever lands in a static linux library (lib*.a): if not told otherwise the linker will ignore any unused variable including initialisation -> foo() will never be called. –  josefx Jun 5 '12 at 20:35
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In C++ there is a simple method: use the constructor of a global object.

class StartUp
{
public:
   StartUp()
   { foo(); }
};

StartUp startup; // A global instance

int main()
{
    ...
}

This because the global object is constructed before main() starts. As Lundin pointed out, pay attention to the static initialization order fiasco.

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Any part of the initialization, really, including arguments passed to a constructor. –  Ben Voigt Jun 5 '12 at 12:48
1  
Just be aware of this subtle bug. The function called cannot be allowed to depend on any static resources. You should write it as you would write a re-entrant function. –  Lundin Jun 5 '12 at 13:44
add comment

In C++ it is possible, e.g.

static int dummy = (some_function(), 0);

int main() {}

In C this is not allowed because initializers for objects with static storage duration must be constant expressions.

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In C there is not a way? Only in C++? –  Nick Jun 5 '12 at 12:57
    
@Nick: yes, as far as I know. –  Charles Bailey Jun 5 '12 at 12:58
1  
@CharlesBailey: You can make it work in C as well: static size_t dummy = sizeof(some_function(), 0); –  Nawaz Jun 5 '12 at 13:01
2  
@Nawaz: Does that work? I was under the impression that sizeof didn't evaluate its argument. (ideone.com/dG62n) –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 5 '12 at 13:05
1  
@Nawaz, initializations of static variables must be constant expressions that are not evaluated. This doesn't work at all. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 5 '12 at 13:10
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If using gcc and g++ compilers then this can be done by using __attribute__((constructor))

eg::
In gcc (c) ::

#include <stdio.h>

void beforeMain (void) __attribute__((constructor));

void beforeMain (void)
{
  printf ("\nbefore main\n");
}

int main ()
{
 printf ("\ninside main \n");
 return 0;
}

In g++ (c++) ::

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void beforeMain (void) __attribute__((constructor));

void beforeMain (void)
{
  cout<<"\nbefore main\n";
}

int main ()
{
  cout<<"\ninside main \n";
  return 0;
}
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Thanks, good answer +1 –  Nick Jun 5 '12 at 13:21
5  
Except this isn't C nor C++, it is GCC non-standard extensions. –  Lundin Jun 5 '12 at 13:40
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I would suggest you to refer this link..

http://bhushanverma.blogspot.in/2010/09/how-to-call-function-before-main-and.html

For GCC compiler on Linux/Solaris:

#include

void my_ctor (void) __attribute__ ((constructor));
void my_dtor (void) __attribute__ ((destructor));

void
my_ctor (void)
{
printf ("hello before main()\n");
}

void
my_dtor (void)
{
printf ("bye after main()\n");
}

int
main (void)
{
printf ("hello\n");
return 0;
}

$gcc main.c
$./a.out
hello before main()
hello
bye after main()
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