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Currently I'm facing the problem, that I try to design a DAL for my .NET application, which will later use some sort of NoSQL database.
The NoSQL databases I evaluated by now sometimes differ in the type they use as primary key. For example, MongoDB uses a proprietary ObjectID while RavenDB uses a common string. So my question is, how do I design such a DAL which can handle different types of domain model id's.

My first approach was to make generic domain models. This looked something like this:

// Domain Model
public class Filter<TId> {
  public TId Id { get; set; }
  // ...
}

// DAO-interface
public interface IFilterDao<TId> {
  bool Persist(Filter<TId>);
  // ...
}

// This is where the problems begin
public static class DAOFactory {
  public static IFilterDAO<T> GetFilterDAO<T>() {
    // Implementation of IFilterDAO<T> can't be instantiated because types must be known at compile time
  }
}

The comment in the DAO-Factory method already describes the problem: I can't define T at runtime, because the corresponding code is generated at compile time.

My second and third approach was to define the Id to be either object or dynamic. RavenDB couldn't work with object, because it needs a string. Using dynamic I couldn't pass lambdas to the RavenDB API (Compiler error "An expression tree may not contain a dynamic operation" occured). And building expression trees instead of using lambdas is really the last way out because it's way more time-consuming.

So I'm totally stuck and I hope someone can help me out. Thanks in advance.

UPDATE: I finally got RavenDB to work with object, but it's not a satisfying solution to use object.

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1 Answer 1

You could solve the problem in the static class if you knew the type at compile time, correct? That means that, necessarily, you will need one DaoFactory implementation for every underlying database.

The answer is that you shouldn't be using the factory pattern - instead, you should be using the abstract factory pattern.

public class Filter<TId> { 
  public TId Id { get; set; } 
} 

public interface IFilterDao<TId> { 
  bool Persist(Filter<TId>); 
} 

// Note: Can't be static since polymorphism requires an instance!
public abstract class DaoFactory<TId> {
  public abstract IFilterDao<TId> GetFilterDao<TId>();
}

public sealed class MongoDBDaoFactory : DaoFactory<ObjectID> {
  public override IFilterDao<ObjectID> GetFilterDao<ObjectID>() { /* ... */ }
}

public sealed class RavenDBDaoFactory : DaoFactory<String> {
  public override IFilterDao<String> GetFilterDao<String>() { /* ... */ }
}

I've had to do similar things and tried using the dependency injection pattern for selecting the appropriate implementation to use at runtime, but that's actually very hard to do because of the generics issue. Abstract factory is the best way to go here.

share|improve this answer
    
But now I have to tell the compiler explicitly that I want a e.g. MongoDBFactory, don't I? I mean, if I create the factory I still have to provide the type like this: DaoFactory<ObjectId> factory = new MongoDBFactory(); And that was exactly what I wanted to put in the configuration. –  Johannes Egger Jun 6 '12 at 6:05
    
True; like I said, using DI becomes very tricky with generic interfaces. I know it can be done (I believe Microsoft's Unity, for example, does this); I'm just not sure it's what you really want to do. After all, you have to know the type of TId in your client code anyways, right? In all likelihood, if you're migrating between totally different databases then recompiling the code is going to be the least of your concerns. –  Lars Kemmann Jun 6 '12 at 6:12
    
I guess you're right that I would face some more problems at higher layers. And if DI is really that tricky I guess it's not a choice. I don't wanted to migrate between totally different databases, but only between similar (e.g. only document stores). I will check the solution with DI and if that is not satisfying I will probably unify the type of the id to object. Thanks for your help. +1 for the provided answer. –  Johannes Egger Jun 6 '12 at 6:46
    
You're welcome. Let me know if you find a better way to do this! –  Lars Kemmann Jun 7 '12 at 3:31

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