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I would like to split a var twice with awk, this is what i have got so far.

awk -v p=1,3,8,25-27,4-16 '{split(p,t,",");for (i in t) if(t[i] ~ /-/) split(t[i],t1,"-") {print "-dFirstPage=" t1[1] ,"-dFirstPage=" t1[2]} ELSE {print "-dFirstPage=" t[i] ,"-dFirstPage=" t[i]}}' >outfile

output shall be

-dFirstPage=1 -dLastPage=1
-dFirstPage=3 -dLastPage=3
-dFirstPage=8 -dLastPage=8
-dFirstPage=25 -dLastPage=27
-dFirstPage=4 -dLastPage=16
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Could you pass the value of p as a input to awk? In this case, I would do it this way:

$ echo 1,3,8,25-27,4-16 | awk -F- -v RS=, '{printf "-dFirstPage=%s -dLastPage=%s\n", $1, $2?$2:$1}'
-dFirstPage=1 -dLastPage=1
-dFirstPage=3 -dLastPage=3
-dFirstPage=8 -dLastPage=8
-dFirstPage=25 -dLastPage=27
-dFirstPage=4 -dLastPage=16

How this works:

  • I define that comma will be the record separator (-v RS=,) and hyphen will be the field separator (-F-). So, the input

    1,3,8,25-27,4-16
    

    will be roughly equivalent to

    1
    3
    8
    25 27
    4 16
    
  • Then, I use printf:

    '{printf "-dFirstPage=%s -dLastPage=%s\n", $1, $2?$2:$1}'
    

    The first parameter is the first column. In the second parameter, I ask if the second column $2 exists; if so, then the value of the parameter is $2; if no, the value is the first column $1.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent and easy! –  sdf Jun 5 '12 at 18:18

In bash:

#!/bin/bash

vars=1,3,8,25-27,4-16

for pages in `echo $vars | tr ',' '\n'`; do
    if [[ -n $( echo $pages | grep --only-matching "-" ) ]]; then
        firstPage=`echo ${pages%%-*}`
        lastPage=`echo ${pages##*-}`
    else
        firstPage=$pages
        lastPage=$pages
    fi
    echo "-dFirstPage=${firstPage} -dLastPage=${lastPage}"
done

Output:

-dFirstPage=1 -dLastPage=1
-dFirstPage=3 -dLastPage=3
-dFirstPage=8 -dLastPage=8
-dFirstPage=25 -dLastPage=27
-dFirstPage=4 -dLastPage=16

Apply some @shellter's advices:

#!/bin/bash

vars=1,3,8,25-27,4-16
for pages in `echo $vars | tr ',' '\n'`; do
    case $pages in
        *-* )
            firstPage=${pages%%-*}
            lastPage=${pages##*-}
            ;;
        * )
            firstPage=$pages
            lastPage=$pages
            ;;
    esac
    echo "-dFirstPage=${firstPage} -dLastPage=${lastPage}"
done
share|improve this answer
    
nice alternate solution! Good use of ${pages%%-*}. But why are people afraid of case statments? You can eliminate all the extra processes with case $pages in *-* ) .... ;; * ) firstPage=$pages ; lastPage=$pages ;; esac . Also, I don't think you need "backtic echo, just firstPage=${pages%%-*}; ... Good luck to all. –  shellter Jun 5 '12 at 14:10
    
Thanks for review, @shellter. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Jun 5 '12 at 14:16
    
while IFS=, read -r pages; do ... done <(echo "$vars") (in other words, that's not a proper use of for). No need for [[ -n $(echo | grep) ]] - you could do if echo | grep -qs (or redirect stdout and stderr to /dev/null) directly without brackets. Plus, what shellter said. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 5 '12 at 16:37

You where very close, (but I'm not sure this solution will really meet your ultimate requirements).

 awk -v p=1,3,8,25-27,4-16 '
 END{
        split(p,t,",");
  for (i in t) {
    if(t[i] ~ /-/) {
        split(t[i],t1,"-");
      print "-dFirstPage=" t1[1] ,"-dFirstPage=" t1[2]
    }
    else {
      print "-dFirstPage=" t[i] ,"-dFirstPage=" t[i]
    }
  }
}' /dev/null > outfile

Revised for windows and more general solution

 echo "1,3,8,25-27,4-16" \
 | awk '
 {
   split($0,t,",");
   for (i in t) {
     if(t[i] ~ /-/) {
        split(t[i],t1,"-");
        print "-dFirstPage=" t1[1] ,"-dFirstPage=" t1[2]
     }
     else {
       print "-dFirstPage=" t[i] ,"-dFirstPage=" t[i]
     }
   }
 }' > outfile

Feel free to edit your question if this requires clarification.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
For some reason the script is on an invinite loop. I use gawk on windows and need to force the script to exit. When the script ended forcefully the output though is correct. Any suggestion? –  sdf Jun 5 '12 at 14:29
    
Ack!, Windows doesn't have printf. See revised revision;-) .good luck. –  shellter Jun 5 '12 at 14:50
    
Are you using a unix-like environment on Windows, like cygwin or Mingw (or others), or the cmd.exe from windows to execute this? Good luck. –  shellter Jun 5 '12 at 15:00

You were very close:

awk -v p=1,3,8,25-27,4-16 'BEGIN {split(p,t,",");for (i in t) if(t[i] ~ /-/) {split(t[i],t1,"-"); print "-dFirstPage=" t1[1] ,"-dFirstPage=" t1[2]} else {print "-dFirstPage=" t[i] ,"-dFirstPage=" t[i]}}' >outfile
  • Use a BEGIN clause
  • Change "ELSE" to else
  • Move the curly brace from before the first print to before the split and place a semicolon where it was
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks works perfect. –  sdf Jun 5 '12 at 18:14

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