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I got many lines in a row which may throw an exception, but no matter what, it should still continue the next line. How to do this without individually try catching every single statement that may throw an exception?

try:
    this_may_cause_an_exception()
    but_I_still_wanna_run_this()
    and_this()
    and_also_this()
except Exception, e:
    logging.exception('An error maybe occured in one of first occuring functions causing the others not to be executed. Locals: {locals}'.format(locals=locals()))

Let's see above code, all functions may throw exceptions, but it should still execute the next functions no matter if it threw an exception or not. Is there a nice way of doing that?

I dont wanna do this:

try:
    this_may_cause_an_exception()
except:
    pass
try:
    but_I_still_wanna_run_this()
except:
    pass
try:
    and_this()
except:
    pass
try:
    and_also_this()
except:
    pass

I think code should still continue to run after an exception only if the exception is critical (The computer will burn or the whole system will get messed up, it should stop the whole program, but for many small things also exceptions are thrown such as connection failed etc.) I normally don't have any problems with exception handling, but in this case I'm using a 3rd party library which easily throws exceptions for small things.

After looking at m4spy's answer, i thought wouldn't it be possible, to have a decorator which will let every line in the function execute even if one of them raises an exception.

Something like this would be cool:

def silent_log_exceptions(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def _wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        try:
            func(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception:
            logging.exception('...')
            some_special_python_keyword # which causes it to continue executing the next line
    return _wrapper

Or something like this:

def silent_log_exceptions(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def _wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        for line in func(*args, **kwargs):
            try:
                exec line
            except Exception:
                logging.exception('...')
    return _wrapper



@silent_log_exceptions
def save_tweets():
    a = requests.get('http://twitter.com)
    x = parse(a)
    bla = x * x
share|improve this question
3  
Neither of those styles of coding feel terribly pythonic...I'm not really sure what to suggest, but I look forward to the answer. –  Crisfole Jun 5 '12 at 14:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted
for func in [this_may_cause_an_exception,
             but_I_still_wanna_run_this,
             and_this,
             and_also_this]:
    try:
        func()
    except:
        pass

There are two things to notice here:

  • All actions you want to perform have to represented by callables with the same signature (in the example, callables that take no arguments). If they aren't already, wrap them in small functions, lambda expressions, callable classes, etc.
  • Bare except clauses are a bad idea, but you probably already knew that.

An alternative approach, that is more flexible, is to use a higher-order function like

def logging_exceptions(f, *args, **kwargs):
    try:
        f(*args, **kwargs)
    except Exception as e:
        print("Houston, we have a problem: {0}".format(e))
share|improve this answer
    
Yea I knew, thats why I put the first one with logging of locals in the question. It's a new thing I got used to recently to log my locals helps a lot with debugging stuff on production servers. I really like the way you make a list of functions, although in my question it's all functions in my real life example most of them are statements and saving variables also. But could work a way around that though. –  Sam Stoelinga Jun 5 '12 at 14:13

I ran into something similar, and asked a question on SO here. The accepted answer handles logging, and watching for only a specific exception. I ended up with a modified version:

class Suppressor:
    def __init__(self, exception_type, l=None):
        self._exception_type = exception_type
        self.logger = logging.getLogger('Suppressor')
        if l:
            self.l = l
        else:
            self.l = {}
    def __call__(self, expression):
        try:
            exec expression in self.l
        except self._exception_type as e:
            self.logger.debug('Suppressor: suppressed exception %s with content \'%s\'' % (type(self._exception_type), e))

Usable like so:

s = Suppressor(yourError, locals()) 
s(cmdString)

So you could set up a list of commands and use map with the suppressor to run across all of them.

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2  
Never set a default parameter value to a mutable like List, Dictionary or (in some conditions) object. Because they are evaluated only once and will cause serious memory leaks and logical errors. docs.python.org/tutorial/… –  FallenAngel Jun 5 '12 at 14:27
    
use a decorator instead... –  schlamar Jun 5 '12 at 14:28
    
@FallenAngel Whoops! I can't believe I did that, thanks! –  Spencer Rathbun Jun 5 '12 at 14:33
try:
    this_may_cause_an_exception()
except:
    logging.exception('An error occured')
finally:
    but_I_still_wanna_run_this()
    and_this()
    and_also_this()

You can use the finally block of exception handling. It is actually meant for cleanup code though.

EDIT: I see you said all of the functions can throw exceptions, in which case larsmans' answer is about the cleanest I can think of to catch exception for each function call.

share|improve this answer
3  
What if an exception occur in but_i_still_wanna_run_this() –  shiva Jun 5 '12 at 14:15
    
Which is why I edited the post to include my realisation that Sam wants to catch exceptions on each function. –  Christian Witts Jun 5 '12 at 14:21
1  
Just delete your post if it does not address the question correctly... –  schlamar Jun 5 '12 at 14:27

You can handle such a task with a decorator:

import logging
from functools import wraps

def log_ex(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def _wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        try:
            func(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception:
            logging.exception('...')
    return _wrapper

@log_ex
def this_may_cause_an_exception():
    print 'this_may_cause_an_exception'
    raise RuntimeError()

@log_ex
def but_i_wanna_run_this():
    print 'but_i_wanna_run_this'

def test():
    this_may_cause_an_exception()
    but_i_wanna_run_this()

Calling the test function will look like (which will show that both functions were executed):

>>> test()
this_may_cause_an_exception
ERROR:root:...
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in _wrapper
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in my_func
RuntimeError
but_i_wanna_run_this
share|improve this answer
    
What if a line in the function raises an exception, i dont think it would execute the next line right? But instead get out of the function and log the exception? –  Sam Stoelinga Jun 6 '12 at 11:37
    
@SamStoelinga No, but the next function will be called. I updated the answer above so it should be more clear. It is a similar approach than the accepted answer but you don't have to create the list and your functions do not need to have a fixed signature. –  schlamar Jun 6 '12 at 12:13
    
Ah yea that was stupid of me ;) also a nice workaround but would still cause me lots of code, I think the best solution would be to have a decorator, which will let the whole function execute no matter if any line of the function raises an error, not sure if this is possible though in python. –  Sam Stoelinga Jun 6 '12 at 12:25

Sometimes, when language misses to support your elegant way of expressing an idea because language development literally failed the last decades, you can only rely on the fact that Python is still a dynamical language which supports the exec statement, which makes the following possible:

code="""
for i in range(Square_Size):
    Square[i,i] @= 1
    Square[i+1,i] @= 2
    @dowhatever()
"""

This new operator makes code more pythonic and elegant since you don't need to specify additional if-statemens that guarantee that the index stays in bound or the function does succeed which is totally irrelevant to what we want to express (it just shouldn't stop) here (note: while safe indexing would be possible by creating a class based on the list class, this operator works whenever there should be a try catch) , in Lisp it would be easy to define it in a Lispy way, but it seams to be impossible to define it in an elegant way in Python, but still, here is the little preparser which will make it possible: exec "\n".join([o+"try: "+z.replace("@","")+"\n"+o+"except: pass" if "@" in z else z for z in code.split("\n") for o in ["".join([h for h in z if h==" "])]]) #new <- hackish operator which wraps try catch into line

The result, assuming that Square was 4x4 and contained only zeros:

[1 0 0 0]
[2 1 0 0]
[0 2 1 0]
[0 0 2 1]

Relevant: The Sage / Sagemath CAS uses a preparse-function which transforms code before it reaches the Python interpreter. A monkey-patch for that function would be:

def new_preparse(code,*args, **kwargs):
    code="\n".join([o+"try: "+z.replace("@","")+"\n"+o+"except: pass" if "@" in z else z for z in code.split("\n") for o in ["".join([h for h in z if h==" "])]])
    return preparse(code)
sage.misc.preparser.preparse=new_preparse
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