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I am using the Oracle SQL Developer Scratch Editor tool. There are a couple of small errors, I am not sure how to fix.

--SQLDEV:Following Line Not Recognized
WHILE @I <= @PAT_CNT

--SQLDEV:Following Line Not Recognized
BEGIN

SELECT PAT_NUMBER ,
       PATIENT_ID ,
       MRN ,
       LAST_NAME ,
       FIRST_NAME ,
       UNIT_CODE ,
       NURSING_UNIT ,
       SDT ,
       EDT ,
       SHIFT_CODE ,
       START_TIME ,
       END_TIME 

  INTO v_PAT_NUMBER,
       v_PATIENT_ID,
       v_MRN,
       v_LAST_NAME,
       v_FIRST_NAME,
       v_UNIT_CODE,
       v_NURSING_UNIT,
       v_SDT,
       v_EDT,
       v_SHIFT_CODE,
       v_START_TIME,
       v_END_TIME
  FROM tt_v_PATS 
 WHERE PKEY = v_I;


BEGIN
   v_L_CUR_DATE := TRUNC_DATE(v_P_START_DATE) ;
END;

--SQLDEV:Following Line Not Recognized
WHILE @L_CUR_DATE <= OPTC.TRUNC_DATE(@P_END_DATE)

--SQLDEV:Following Line Not Recognized
BEGIN
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not obvious to me exactly what you are attempting to do here...

In PL/SQL, variables are declared in the DECLARE section of an anonymous PL/SQL block or in the IS/ AS section of a named PL/SQL block (a stored procedure or a stored function). In PL/SQL, a BEGIN needs to be paired with an END-- I see a bunch of BEGIN statements in your code with no associated END. And in PL/SQL, you don't use @ to refer to variables.

Something like this is syntactically valid, it's not obvious that it does what you want, however.

DECLARE
  v_PAT_NUMBER     tt_v_PATS.PAT_NUMBER%type;
  v_PATIENT_ID     tt_v_PATS.PATIENT_ID%type;
  v_MRN            tt_v_PATS.MRN%type;
  v_LAST_NAME      tt_v_PATS.LAST_NAME%type;
  v_FIRST_NAME     tt_v_PATS.FIRST_NAME%type;
  v_UNIT_CODE      tt_v_PATS.UNIT_CODE%type;
  v_NURSING_UNIT   tt_v_PATS.NURSING_UNIT%type;
  v_SDT            tt_v_PATS.SDT%type;
  v_EDT            tt_v_PATS.EDT%type;
  v_SHIFT_CODE     tt_v_PATS.SHIFT_CODE%type;
  v_START_TIME     tt_v_PATS.START_TIME%type;
  v_END_TIME       tt_v_PATS.END_TIME%type;
  v_pat_cnt        integer := 100;
BEGIN                 
  FOR i IN 1 .. v_pat_cnt
  LOOP
    SELECT PAT_NUMBER ,   
           PATIENT_ID ,   
           MRN ,          
           LAST_NAME ,    
           FIRST_NAME ,   
           UNIT_CODE ,    
           NURSING_UNIT , 
           SDT ,          
           EDT ,          
           SHIFT_CODE ,   
           START_TIME ,   
           END_TIME                              
      INTO v_PAT_NUMBER,  
           v_PATIENT_ID,  
           v_MRN,         
           v_LAST_NAME,   
           v_FIRST_NAME,  
           v_UNIT_CODE,   
           v_NURSING_UNIT,
           v_SDT,         
           v_EDT,         
           v_SHIFT_CODE,  
           v_START_TIME,  
           v_END_TIME     
      FROM tt_v_PATS      
     WHERE PKEY = i;  
     <<do something with the local variables>>
  END LOOP;
END;  

Of course, you can also use record types to simplify your code a bit

DECLARE
  v_PATS_REC       tt_v_PATS%rowype;
  v_pat_cnt        integer := 100;
BEGIN                 
  FOR i IN 1 .. v_pat_cnt
  LOOP
    SELECT *                             
      INTO v_PATS_REC   
      FROM tt_v_PATS      
     WHERE PKEY = i;  
     <<do something with the record>>
  END LOOP;
END;  
share|improve this answer
    
OK thanks for that Justin. I have an app that works with both SQL Server and Oracle users. Most are SQL Server. We have to write the stored procedures to work in Oracle. I code them in SQL Server first as I don't know Oracle well. I used this tool Scratch Editor for the convert. –  Pinchas K Jun 5 '12 at 14:33

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