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I have a set of utility classes that store static const data members. Now I need to use these data members in functional classes. I am planning to use references (dont want pointers) to the static const objects, but keep getting the error below. Can you please point out the logical/technical mistake in the code?

#include <string>

class staticData
{
  public:
   static const int cs = 1;
   static const staticData data1;

  private:
   staticData(int id_): _id(id_)   //NOTE: Private constructer, static access only!!
   { }

   int _id;
};

const staticData staticData::data1(1001);

class testReference
{
  public:
    testReference(): _member(staticData::data1)
    {}

  private:
    staticData& _member;
};

invalid initialization of reference of type âstaticData&â from expression of type âconst staticDataâ

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're attempting to reference a const object through a non-const reference.

Thus, the original object can be modified through the reference, as the reference is non-const, and thus you're breaking the contract you made when declaring the object as const.

There are 2 options:

  • remove the const from static const staticData data1;
  • make the reference const: const staticData& _member;

EDIT:

As per your comment, you can have:

class testReference
{
  public:
    testReference(): _member(&staticData::data1)
    {}

  private:
    staticData const * _member;
};

This way, you can change what _member points to (not possible with references), but you can't change the object itself.

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I want to keep static const staticData data1, but want to be able to change what _member might refer to. Is that possible? –  vid Jun 5 '12 at 14:22
    
@vid no. A reference cannot be changed to refer to a different object. It will always refer to data1. You could use a pointer for that though. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 5 '12 at 14:24
    
@vid see edit... –  Luchian Grigore Jun 5 '12 at 14:26
    
Thank you. In fact i could use static staticData data1, and make all data members private - this will make it essentially immutable, and can use references. Is that fine? –  vid Jun 5 '12 at 14:27
1  
@vid again, if you use references, you can't re-assign them. And no. Although it might work, you shouldn't remove the const just to make it compile. Is that object ever going to change? If not, make it const. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 5 '12 at 14:28

_member is a reference allowing mutation. data1 is immutable. It's impossible to provide a writable view of a read-only object.

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