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Let's say I have a global variable

 char  Dir[80];  /* declared and defined in file1.c  but not exported using extern etc */

The Dir variable is the name of a directory created at run time in the program's main(). In this file we manipulate this variable and pass it to a function func defined in file2.c This Dir variable is a directory in which all functions create thier individual logs.

Instead of passing this variable n number of times to each one of the functions which finally called func().I made it global.

func(x,Dir); /* x is a  local variable in a function  */

/* now in file2.c */

void func(int x,char *Dir)
{
   /*use this variable Dir */
}

The value of Dir we receive here is not the same as in file1.c. Why ? Compiler: gcc on Windows

share|improve this question
2  
It might be different because you are expecting Dir2 instead of Dir? – Mike Kwan Jun 5 '12 at 14:16
    
@MikeKwan that was a copy paste error but I have corrected it – user1437565 Jun 5 '12 at 14:19
1  
Well that code by itself is fine. Can you show a minimal example which reproduces your issue? – Mike Kwan Jun 5 '12 at 14:22
    
The value of Dir will be the same if this is how you have written your code. What makes you think it is not? – ArjunShankar Jun 5 '12 at 14:26
    
how you have initialized char Dir[80]? – Aftnix Jun 5 '12 at 14:30

Your code is fine as it stands. I can give you an example of how multiple source files should be used in C and you can compare with what you have written.

Given a main.c and a some_lib.c containing func, you need to define a some_lib.h which defines the function prototype of func defined in some_lib.c.

main.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "some_lib.h"
/*
 * This means main.c can expect the functions exported in some_lib.h
 * to be exposed by some source it will later be linked against.
 */

int main(void)
{
    char dir[] = "some_string";

    func(100, dir);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

some_lib.c (contains definition of func):

#include "some_lib.h"

void func(int x, char * dir)
{
    printf("Received %d and %s\n", x, dir);
}

some_lib.h (contains function prototype/declaration of exported functions of some_lib.c):

#ifndef SOME_LIB_H
#define SOME_LIB_H
#include <stdio.h>

void func(int x, char * dir);

#endif

The above should then be compiled with:

gcc main.c some_lib.c -o main

This will produce:

Received 100 and some_string

However, if you are indeed using a global variable, it is not even necessary to pass dir at all. Consider this modified main.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "some_lib.h"

char dir[] = "some_string";

int main(void)
{
    func(100);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

dir is defined in here and is globally accessible/defined. All we need to do is make sure that some_lib.c knows that it exists. The linker can then resolve this symbol during the linking stage. some_lib.h needs to be defined as so:

#ifndef SOME_LIB_H
#define SOME_LIB_H
#include <stdio.h>

/*
 * The extern informs the compiler that there is a variable of type char array which
 * is defined somewhere elsewhere but it doesn't know where. The linker will
 * match this with the actual definition in main.c in the linking stage.
 */
extern char dir[];
void func(int x);

#endif

some_lib.c can then use the globally defined variable as if it were scoped:

#include "some_lib.h"

void func(int x)
{
    printf("Received %d and %s\n", x, dir);
}

Compiling and running this will produce the same output as the first example.

share|improve this answer
    
It should be noted that example 1 with dir as a local is good programming practice, and example 2 with dir as a global is very bad programming practice. – Lundin Jun 5 '12 at 14:40
    
For more information on global variables, see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/176118/…. – Mike Kwan Jun 5 '12 at 14:42
    
I have programmed C for ages, everything from real time embedded systems to PC graphic fluff. I have never had the need to use a global variable. In my experience, the need of global variables comes from: 1) muddy thinking, and/or 2) poor program design, and/or 3) poor knowledge of the C language: failing to understand mechanisms such as static variables, inlining and opaque data types (pointer to an incomplete type that is privately encapsulated). – Lundin Jun 5 '12 at 14:48
    
I did want to pass it an extern as that second file is given by client and cannot be changed. – user1437565 Jun 5 '12 at 18:33

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