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What's the appropriate way of overriding the a Model class's getattr in Django 1.4?

I have a model structure like:

class Main(models.Model):
    [blah]

class Detail(models.Model):
   main = models.ForeignKey(Main)
   name = models.CharField(max_length=255)
   value= models.CharField(max_length=255)

I had overridden my Main.getattr_ so I could reference Detail records as though they were normal Main attributes. e.g. a simple meta- model pattern like

>>> m = Main.objects.create()
>>> Detail.objects.create(main=m, name='name', value='value')
>>> print m.name
'value'

To do this, my pre-1.4 getattr looked like:

def __getattr__(self, attrname):
    qs = self.details.filter(name=attrname)
    c = len(qs)
    if c == 0:
        raise AttributeError
    elif c == 1:
        return qs[0].value
    else:
        return [d.value for d in qs]

This worked perfectly until I upgraded to 1.4. Now I get all types "attribute X does not exist" errors. I tried something like the following, but had no luck. It seems to especially conflict with the "_*_cache" attributes Django generates for ForeignKey references.

def __getattr__(self, attrname):
    try:
        return super(Main, self).__getattr__(attrname)
    except AttributeError:
        pass
    qs = self.details.filter(name=attrname)
    c = len(qs)
    if c == 0:
        raise AttributeError
    elif c == 1:
        return qs[0].value
    else:
        return [d.value for d in qs]

How do I resolve this?

share|improve this question
2  
This is a good time to stop and ask: why the H-E-double-hockey-sticks are you doing that? Not only does it look like a dirty hack, it's also hugely inefficient, generating a database query every time you access an attribute on the instance. You're not even caching anything. – Chris Pratt Jun 5 '12 at 14:27
1  
Admittedly, my case is unusual. To describe it briefly, my model allows users to define their own custom models. Caching is trivial to add, which I've left out for simplicity. – Cerin Jun 5 '12 at 18:05

Digging through the new model code, it seems the backend has been changed substantially, so that the Model class no longer has a __getattr__ to override. Instead, I need to call object.__getattribute__, which the base model inherits from. However, Django stores cached data in special attributes, which need to be properly handled.

My new __getattr__ now looks like:

def __getattr__(self, attrname):
    try:
        return super(Main, self).__getattribute__(attrname)
    except AttributeError:
        if attrname.startswith('_prefetched'):
            raise
    qs = self.details.filter(name=attrname)
    c = len(qs)
    if c == 0:
        raise AttributeError
    elif c == 1:
        return qs[0].value
    else:
        return [d.value for d in qs]
share|improve this answer

I haven't tried this, but __getattribute__() might work:

class Main(models.Model):
    def __getattribute__(self, attrname):
        try:
            return super(Main, self).__getattribute__(attrname)
        except AttributeError:
            try:
                return self.__getattr__(attrname)
            except AttributeError:
                # do your database accessing

But as Chris Pratt said, this is not a bit efficient. You might want to consider caching your attributes.

share|improve this answer
1  
getattr(self, name) will call self.__getattribute__(name), leading to infinite recursion. – bruno desthuilliers Jun 30 '12 at 12:21
    
Oh, you're right! I edited my answer accordingly. – Maccesch Jun 30 '12 at 18:19

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