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f=open("vmi","w")
f.write("asdf")
import os
os.path.getsize("vmi")
#0 byte
f.close()
os.path.getsize("vmi")
# 4 bytes

Where I can find lost 4 bytes, on program execution, before file is closed?

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1  
The Python manual states explicitly: "Due to buffering, the string may not actually show up in the file until the flush() or close() method is called." –  Hristo Iliev Jun 5 '12 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could try to flush out the data first:

f.flush()

Why would you need to do this? Well, the OS will try to buffer writes to files for performance reasons - it is a lot slower to write 1024 bytes one at a time than just write out the whole buffer. So, whenever you are working with a file / pipe / socket kind of thing, keep in mind that it might be buffering writes and that you will need to flush first.

When you closed the file, it was flushed automatically.

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Also, If you write to a file and then read back from it, you usually need to flush in between the write and read. –  Mike DeSimone Jun 5 '12 at 14:33
    
If the OS is buffering the file, why doesn't the OS know about it and report the buffered size of the file? Sounds more like it's python doing the buffering. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 5 '12 at 14:35
    
i'm not sure. the python docs mention stdio and fflush. i get your point, but i don't think that is how it works... –  Daren Thomas Jun 5 '12 at 14:40
    
sorry, may be it's wrong idea, but i expect to get something like this: >>> f.flush(); >>> f.read() # and as a result - 'smth error text' –  Александр Кривошеев Jun 7 '12 at 18:44

Try this:

import os
f = open("vmi", "w")
f.write("asdf")
f.flush()
os.path.getsize("vmi")
#4 byte
f.close()
os.path.getsize("vmi")
# 4 bytes
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want just to getsize() give me real size, but I want to get the full data from stderr, when the program is running –  Александр Кривошеев Jun 7 '12 at 18:47

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