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To check for odd and even integer, is the lowest bit checking more efficient than using the modulo?

>>> def isodd(num):
        return num & 1 and True or False

>>> isodd(10)
False
>>> isodd(9)
True
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What's with "and True or False"? –  FogleBird Jul 7 '09 at 1:33
13  
If you're trying to get a boolean result, just do bool(num & 1) –  FogleBird Jul 7 '09 at 1:34
    
I am using Python 3.1 –  riza Jul 7 '09 at 1:41
3  
"0 is true and 1 is false"?! Now THAT would be an INTERESTING language to program in, indeed...!!! –  Alex Martelli Jul 7 '09 at 1:42
1  
I screwed that up. In Python, 0 IS FALSE and 1 IS TRUE. (But in *nix, exit codes of 0 indicate success. bash is indeed interesting.) –  eksortso Jul 7 '09 at 1:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Yep. The timeit module in the standard library is how you check on those things. E.g:

AmAir:stko aleax$ python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x & 1' 'isodd(9)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.446 usec per loop
AmAir:stko aleax$ python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x & 1' 'isodd(10)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.443 usec per loop
AmAir:stko aleax$ python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x % 2' 'isodd(10)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.453 usec per loop
AmAir:stko aleax$ python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x % 2' 'isodd(9)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.461 usec per loop

As you see, on my (first-day==old==slow;-) Macbook Air, the & solution is repeatably between 7 and 18 nanoseconds faster than the % solution.

timeit not only tells you what's faster, but by how much (just run the tests a few times), which usually shows how supremely UNimportant it is (do you really care about 10 nanoseconds' difference, when the overhead of calling the function is around 400?!-)...

Convincing programmers that micro-optimizations are essentially irrelevant has proven to be an impossible task -- even though it's been 35 years (over which computers have gotten orders of magnitude faster!) since Knuth wrote

We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil.

which as he explained is a quote from an even older statement from Hoare. I guess everybody's totally convinced that THEIR case falls in the remaining 3%!

So instead of endlessly repeating "it doesn't matter", we (Tim Peters in particular deserves the honors there) put in the standard Python library module timeit, that makes it trivially easy to measure such micro-benchmarks and thereby lets at least some programmers convince themselves that, hmmm, this case DOES fall in the 97% group!-)

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The compiler isn't going to optimize those to the same instruction(s)? Excuse my Python-ignorance if it shows. –  GManNickG Jul 7 '09 at 1:30
2  
No, the Python compiler is itself optimized to be maximally simple, reliable, and fast -- it doesn't do optimizations such as changing the operation in use (for which it would have to infer that x is always integer, for example). Try psyco if you need this kind of low-level optimization (i.e. if every nanosecond matters). –  Alex Martelli Jul 7 '09 at 1:34
1  
Thank you for adding a point about the unimportance of such a small difference. Even performing the calculation hundreds, or even thousands of times, this is probably one of the worst "optimizations" you can make - not only does it hurt readability (IMO), but you don't get that much back out of it. I never want to pay more than what I get. –  Thomas Owens Jul 7 '09 at 1:34
1  
Oh yea, I forgot Python isn't statically typed. (right?) There goes the Python ignorance alarm again. –  GManNickG Jul 7 '09 at 1:37
1  
@Thomas, I actually edited the answer repeatedly to explain exactly how irrelevant it is, provide Knuth's quote, explain why we put timeit in the library, &c; but SO is very much of a 100-yards dash, so to get any rep about it I chose to provide the solution first, the homilies later. Looks like this time your choice to provide only the homilies, with no code or solution, is winning the rep race;-). (BTW, I don't think either &1 or %2 is any less readable than the other, in this case). –  Alex Martelli Jul 7 '09 at 1:46

To be totally honest, I don't think it matters.

The first issue is readability. What makes more sense to other developers? I, personally, would expect a modulo when checking the evenness/oddness of a number. I would expect that most other developers would expect the same thing. By introducing a different, and unexpected, method, you might make code reading, and therefore maintenance, more difficult.

The second is just a fact that you probably won't ever have a bottleneck when doing either operation. I'm for optimization, but early optimization is the worst thing you can do in any language or environment. If, for some reason, determining if a number is even or odd is a bottleneck, then find the fastest way of solving the problem. However, this brings me back to my first point - the first time you write a routine, it should be written in the most readable way possible.

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I'm half expecting down-votes on this, but I think this is an important point for anyone who is wondering this (or any similar) question, so it's going to stay. –  Thomas Owens Jul 7 '09 at 1:31
    
Actually I was writing a similar answer, hence my comment on Alex's answer. I think the compiler should be smart enough to optimize it anyway. Make a function iseven() and implement it as a modulo, and if & turns out to be faster, change it and leave a comment explaining that 'checking the last bit is faster than modulo'. The benefit, of course, is that either way users will simply be calling iseven(), so there is no confusion anyway. –  GManNickG Jul 7 '09 at 1:35
    
Not a down vote persay... But, it has been the Pythonic solution in cases like this to profile the "obvious" options and prefer the fastest. –  Stan Graves Jul 7 '09 at 1:37
2  
semiuseless: I'm still learning Python, but I personally think that the modulo operator would be more Pythonic simply because you are doing what is expected. It's, to me at least, far more obvious and clear. –  Thomas Owens Jul 7 '09 at 1:40
    
I'm with you on that. As Donald Knuth said, "premature optimization is the root of all evil." –  Fernando Jul 7 '09 at 1:48

The best optimization you can get is to not put the test into a function. 'number % 2' and 'number & 1' are very common ways of checking odd/evenness, experienced programmers will recognize the pattern instantly, and you can always throw in a comment such as '# if number is odd, then blah blah blah' if you really need it to be obvious.

# state whether number is odd or even
if number & 1:
    print "Your number is odd"
else:
    print "Your number is even"
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Could you please explain what does % and & do in python? –  LWZ Feb 11 '13 at 19:34
1  
how this number & 1 gives odd number? –  sam Feb 20 '13 at 6:49

"return num & 1 and True or False" ? Wah! If you're speed-crazy (1) "return num & 1" (2) inline it: if somenumber % 2 == 1 is legible AND beats isodd(somenumber) because it avoids the Python function call.

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2  
Yep, avoiding the function call is a big win (though the ==1 is really redundant) -- avoiding the call cuts about 300 nanoseconds from the 450 or so I measured in my answer. –  Alex Martelli Jul 7 '09 at 1:49

John brings up a good point. The real overhead is in the function call:

me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'9 % 2'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0271 usec per loop
me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'10 % 2'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0271 usec per loop

me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'9 & 1'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0271 usec per loop
me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'9 & 1'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0271 usec per loop

me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x % 2' 'isodd(10)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.334 usec per loop
me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x % 2' 'isodd(9)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.358 usec per loop

me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x & 1' 'isodd(10)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.317 usec per loop
me@localhost ~> python -mtimeit -s'def isodd(x): x & 1' 'isodd(9)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.319 usec per loop

Interestingly both methods remore the same time without the function call.

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What if I use lambda to replace the function? isodd = lambda num: num & 1 and True or False –  riza Jul 7 '09 at 2:39

Apart from the evil optimization, it takes away the very idiomatic "var % 2 == 0" that every coder understands without looking twice. So this is violates pythons zen as well for very little gain.

Furthermore a = b and True or False has been superseded for better readability by

return True if num & 1 else False

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Was really surprised none of the above answers did both variable setup (timing literal is different story) and no function invocation (which obviously hides "lower terms"). Stuck on that timing from ipython's timeit, where I got clear winner x&1 - better for ~18% using python2.6 (~12% using python3.1).

On my very old machine:

$ python -mtimeit -s 'x = 777' 'x&1'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.18 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'x = 777' 'x%2'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.219 usec per loop

$ python3 -mtimeit -s 'x = 777' 'x&1'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.282 usec per loop
$ python3 -mtimeit -s 'x = 777' 'x%2'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.323 usec per loop
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