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I have 2 enums in 2 different objects. I want to set the enum in object #1 equal to the enum in object #2.

Here are my objects:

namespace MVC1 {

    public enum MyEnum {
        firstName,
        lastName
      }

   public class Obj1{
        public MyEnum enum1;
    }
   }


     namespace MVC2 {

    public enum MyEnum {
        firstName,
        lastName
      }

    public class Obj2{
        public MyEnum enum1;
      }
    }

I want to do this, but this wont compile:

 MVC1.Obj1 obj1 = new MVC1.Obj1();
 MVC2.Obj2 obj2 = new MVC2.Obj2();
 obj1.enum1 = obj2.enum1; //I know this won't work.

How do I set the enum in Obj1 equal to the enum in Obj2? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Why do you have two enums with the same values in the first place? Remove the definition of one, and replace it, everywhere it's used, with the other. – Servy Jun 5 '12 at 15:02
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming that you keep them the same, you can cast to/from int:

obj1.enum1 = (MVC1.MyEnum)((int)obj2.enum1);
share|improve this answer

Enums have an underlying integer type, which is int (System.Int32) by default, but you can explicitly specify it too, by using "enum MyEnum : type".

Because you're working in two different namespaces, the Enum types are essentially different, but because their underlying type is the same, you can just cast them:

obj1.enum1 = (MVC1.MyEnum) obj2.enum1;

A note: In C# you have to use parentheses for function calls, even when there aren't any parameters. You should add them to the constructor calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, I didn't know you could directly cast enums like that. I've always converted to/from their base type! Learn something new everyday. :) +1 – Chris Sinclair Jun 5 '12 at 14:54
    
I must say I wasn't sure either, but you just confirmed it. :D – lesderid Jun 5 '12 at 14:54
    
I wasn't sure either, so I had to whip up a quick script and check the value. :P – Chris Sinclair Jun 5 '12 at 14:55

Best way to do it is check if it's in range using Enum.IsDefined:

int one = (int)obj2.enum1;
if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(MVC1.MyEnum), one )) { 
  obj1.enum1 = (MVC1.MyEnum)one;
}

 obj1.enum1 = (MVC1.MyEnum) Enum.Parse(typeof(MVC1.MyEnum),
                                 ((int)obj2.enum1).ToString());

or

int one = (int)obj2.enum1;  
obj1.enum1 = (MVC1.MyEnum)one; 
share|improve this answer
    
The underlying types (and even the Enum's values) are exactly the same here. This method will cause a lot of performance loss in large projects. (getting the type, casting, converting to string AND parsing) – lesderid Jun 5 '12 at 14:52
    
@lesderid - but i think its better to check first ...i already added other way if requirement is like that you say... – Pranay Rana Jun 5 '12 at 14:55
    
I was referring to "the safest way". There will never be a problem when casting, only the value can be unexpected. That's why in situations like this one, you shouldn't be casting enums in the first place, there should be only one Enum, not two with exactly the same members. – lesderid Jun 5 '12 at 14:57
1  
Certainly a safe way to do it if you do not have control over the enums or are not confident that they'll be maintained (or you have some values convertable and some not). But otherwise, if you do have control, you may as well write a quick unit test to make sure that you maintain identical values in both enums and take the performance/simplicity boost of direct casting. – Chris Sinclair Jun 5 '12 at 14:57

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