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im relatively new to php and was hoping you could help me understand why you should sanitize html when 'echo'ing , specially if data is from cookie..

i.e instead of

<h3>Hello, <?php echo $_COOKIE['user']; ?>!</h3>

you should do

<h3>Hello, <?php echo htmlspecialchars($_COOKIE['user']); ?>!</h3>

this is what i understand.

cookies are stored on client side, hence are a security risk since the data in them can be manipulated/changed by evil users (lol @ evil) .

but since the cookie is stored on client side, it means a client can only change his own cookie, which means if he adds some kind of malicious code to $_COOKIE['user'] , when the cookie does run, the malicious code will only be shown to one user (who changed the cookie in the first place) and no one else!? so whats the problem?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're assuming that the user changed his own cookie. Cookies can be changed by a third-party (Edit: Using additional software. Third-party websites cannot change the cookie directly). This would enable someone to inject malicious code into the user's browser, changing their user experience and potentially posing an additional security risk for your code.

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How can a cookie be changed by a third party? –  Quentin Jun 5 '12 at 14:53
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If a cookie could be changed by a third party, I would say that the third party could inject the code in a number of ways other than changing cookies and relying on missing htmlspecialchars. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 5 '12 at 14:54
    
Cookies are designed not to be changed by third parties. Modern browsers only allow a site to access cookies originating from their own domain. However, it has happened. Minitech is right in saying that if a third party were to go to those lengths, they would probably be able to spoof the site in an alternate manner. –  Chuck Callebs Jun 5 '12 at 15:00

Instead of just looking security aspect, there is a user experience aspect. The code you present is not really useful for security because risk are very poors in this case BUT if username can contains quote or < > signs, the user will not understand why its login is not displayed correctly.

Using such a code garanties that you will display correctly the username (and add extra security), no matter what kind of characters you allow during the registering process.

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It's not really a risk in that situation - but this is rarely the actual situation. You should do it anyway.

  • Consistency - don't put it in now, and when you change it to something else, you might open up a security hole.
  • User experience - just because a cookie contains HTML doesn't mean it was an XSS injection attempt. What if somebody's name were &amp;? I've been thinking of changing my name to &amp;.
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lolz.. and thanks, guess i will be using htmlspecialchars, or something similar, from now on.. but speaking in terms of "security", is there, at present , a security risk? can someone change someone elses cookies? –  death_relic0 Jun 5 '12 at 15:07
    
@user1263145: Not without some other exploit, no. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 5 '12 at 15:12

A user could inject a script into your page by changing the cookie. That fact alone should be enough to make you pause for thought.

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3  
A user could inject a script into you page by using Grease Monkey, or a proxy server, or typing it directly into the JavaScript console. Using a cookie is a really awkward way to do that. –  Quentin Jun 5 '12 at 14:56
    
@Quentin That's not the point. The point is that it's a potential security hole and it should be plugged up with proper HTML escape techniques like you would for anything else that comes from the client. It's that simple. –  Platinum Azure Jun 5 '12 at 15:10

Imagine you are creating a really by website where many data is stored in the user cookies.

Maybe some of the data in the cookie is used by your website to build an SQL statement, which could result in errors if the user or another website modifies your cookie in a bad way.

If you don't check the cookie data for injections, and even if, something could be written in the cookie that could harm your data consistence, e.g. a String in a varchar collum where only hexadecimal numbers should be inserted.

The best way to deal with that problem is to either use Sessions where possible and only store the minimum amount of required data in the cookie as possible.

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Once again, this doesn't have much to do with HTML escaping. The OP is talking about escaping the client's cookies simply to display them to the client. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 5 '12 at 14:59
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Sure, thats true, but I think the PHP interpreter which gives the error message can't understand for which kind of application the data in the cookie will be used. And on the other Hand I think a new php programmer like him should understand the reason why he gets this error if he's gonna program something bigger in the future. –  Corsair Jun 5 '12 at 15:08
    
I agree with you @Corsair, what minitech doesn't realize is that it is not why you should escape the cookie in that particular example, the OP doesnt understand why to escape at all. See the bigger picture, he's not asking us to solve a problem. –  Nicolás Torres Jun 5 '12 at 15:26
    
@NicolásTorres: He is. Read the question. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 5 '12 at 15:33
    
but since the cookie is stored on client side, it means a client can only change his own cookie, which means if he adds some kind of malicious code to $_COOKIE['user'] , when the cookie does run, the malicious code will only be shown to one user (who changed the cookie in the first place) and no one else!? so whats the problem? ------ It looks to me he doesnt quite understand the whole sense of escaping and filtering user data in order to protect your data AND the system. –  Nicolás Torres Jun 5 '12 at 15:39

but since the cookie is stored on client side, it means a client can only change his own cookie, which means if he adds some kind of malicious code to $_COOKIE['user'] , when the cookie does run, the malicious code will only be shown to one user (who changed the cookie in the first place) and no one else!? so whats the problem?

Well, it depends on your implementation and what you use cookie's data for. An evil user could inject SQL through your cookies, change his permisions, impersonate another user, etc.

That's why you should always code thinking about the worst scenario

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HTML escaping doesn't really have much to do with that. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 5 '12 at 14:56
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Not if you forget to quote :P –  Nicolás Torres Jun 5 '12 at 14:59
    
If you forget to quote, HTML escaping still won't help. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 5 '12 at 15:13

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