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Using sed, how to change the letter 'a' to 'A' but only if it appears repeated as two or more consecutive letters. Example, from:

galaxy
ear
aardvak
Haaaaaaaaa 

into

galaxy
ear
AArdvak
HAAAAAAAAA 
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do it using groups. If you have this file:

$ cat a
galaxy
ear
aardvak
Haaaaaaaaa 
Ulaanbaatar

You can use this sed command:

$ sed 's/\(.\)\1\{1,\}/\U&/g' a
galaxy
ear
AArdvak
HAAAAAAAAA 
UlAAnbAAtar

What does happen here? If we have a char, "packed" in a group (\(.\)), and this group (\1) repeats itself one or more times (\1\{1,\}), then replace the matched part (&) by its uppercased version (\U&).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!! The idea of using \1 already in the first part of the s command is nice and unusual. –  Strapakowsky Jun 5 '12 at 21:59
    
@strapakowsky I know! I forget it is possible with some frequency, for example. Actually, I just remembered it now, after some years, reading your question :D –  brandizzi Jun 6 '12 at 2:10
    
+1 for using \1 in the pattern part. Very elegant solution –  Alessandro Pezzato Jun 6 '12 at 6:40

EDIT
You can do this with:

sed 's/a\(a\+\)/A\U\1/;s/b\(b\+\)/B\U\1/;s/c\(c\+\)/C\U\1/;s/d\(d\+\)/D\U\1/;s/e\(e\+\)/E\U\1/;s/f\(f\+\)/F\U\1/;s/g\(g\+\)/G\U\1/;s/h\(h\+\)/H\U\1/;s/i\(i\+\)/I\U\1/;s/j\(j\+\)/J\U\1/;s/k\(k\+\)/K\U\1/;s/l\(l\+\)/L\U\1/;s/m\(m\+\)/M\U\1/;s/n\(n\+\)/N\U\1/;s/o\(o\+\)/O\U\1/;s/p\(p\+\)/P\U\1/;s/q\(q\+\)/Q\U\1/;s/r\(r\+\)/R\U\1/;s/s\(s\+\)/S\U\1/;s/t\(t\+\)/T\U\1/;s/u\(u\+\)/U\U\1/;s/v\(v\+\)/V\U\1/;s/w\(w\+\)/W\U\1/;s/x\(x\+\)/X\U\1/;s/y\(y\+\)/Y\U\1/;s/z\(z\+\)/Z\U\1/'

(Thanks to shelter)

Or with a pipe of sed:

function capitalize_consecutives () {
  sed 's/a\(a\+\)/A\U\1/' |
  sed 's/b\(b\+\)/B\U\1/' |
  sed 's/c\(c\+\)/C\U\1/' |
  sed 's/d\(d\+\)/D\U\1/' |
  sed 's/e\(e\+\)/E\U\1/' |
  sed 's/f\(f\+\)/F\U\1/' |
  sed 's/g\(g\+\)/G\U\1/' |
  sed 's/h\(h\+\)/H\U\1/' |
  sed 's/i\(i\+\)/I\U\1/' |
  sed 's/j\(j\+\)/J\U\1/' |
  sed 's/k\(k\+\)/K\U\1/' |
  sed 's/l\(l\+\)/L\U\1/' |
  sed 's/m\(m\+\)/M\U\1/' |
  sed 's/n\(n\+\)/N\U\1/' |
  sed 's/o\(o\+\)/O\U\1/' |
  sed 's/p\(p\+\)/P\U\1/' |
  sed 's/q\(q\+\)/Q\U\1/' |
  sed 's/r\(r\+\)/R\U\1/' |
  sed 's/s\(s\+\)/S\U\1/' |
  sed 's/t\(t\+\)/T\U\1/' |
  sed 's/u\(u\+\)/U\U\1/' |
  sed 's/v\(v\+\)/V\U\1/' |
  sed 's/w\(w\+\)/W\U\1/' |
  sed 's/x\(x\+\)/X\U\1/' |
  sed 's/y\(y\+\)/Y\U\1/' |
  sed 's/z\(z\+\)/Z\U\1/' 
}

Then let it parses your file:

capitalize_consecutives < myfile

\U is to UPPERCASE the occurence. I guess this is only for GNU sed.

share|improve this answer
    
What does the \U do? –  Strapakowsky Jun 5 '12 at 15:18
1  
it does UPPERCASE –  Alessandro Pezzato Jun 5 '12 at 15:18
1  
\U works in other seds. The order might be different, i.e. \1\U. Good luck to all. –  shellter Jun 5 '12 at 15:38
    
Also, you don't need all those pipes, just do sed 's/a../../;s/b.../.../;.....' Good luck to all. –  shellter Jun 5 '12 at 15:39
    
It's a pity that you removed answer with 25 pipes. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Jun 5 '12 at 16:24

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