Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to start an asynchronous task from within controller like in following code sniplet from Spring docs.

import org.springframework.core.task.TaskExecutor; 

public class TaskExecutorExample { 

  private class MessagePrinterTask implements Runnable { 

    private int cn; 

    public MessagePrinterTask() { 

    } 

    public void run() { 
//dummy code 
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { 
cn = i; 
} 
} 

} 

private TaskExecutor taskExecutor; 

public TaskExecutorExample(TaskExecutor taskExecutor) { 
    this.taskExecutor = taskExecutor; 
  } 

  public void printMessages() { 

      taskExecutor.execute(new MessagePrinterTask()); 

  } 
} 

afterwards in annother request (in the case that task is running) I need to check the progress of the task. Basicaly get the value of cn.

What would be the best aproach in Spring MVC a how to avoid syncronisation issues.

Thanks

Pepa Procházka

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Have you looked at the @Async annotation in the Spring reference doc?

First, create a bean for your asynchronous task:

@Service
public class AsyncServiceBean implements ServiceBean {

    private AtomicInteger cn;

    @Async
    public void doSomething() { 
        // triggers the async task, which updates the cn status accordingly
    }

    public Integer getCn() {
        return cn.get();
    }
}

Next, call it from the controller:

@Controller
public class YourController {

    private final ServiceBean bean;

    @Autowired
    YourController(ServiceBean bean) {
        this.bean = bean;
    }

    @RequestMapping(value = "/trigger")
    void triggerAsyncJob() {
        bean.doSomething();
    }

    @RequestMapping(value = "/status")
    @ResponseBody
    Map<String, Integer> fetchStatus() {
        return Collections.singletonMap("cn", bean.getCn());
    }        
}

Remember to configure an executor accordingly, e.g.

<task:annotation-driven executor="myExecutor"/>
<task:executor id="myExecutor" pool-size="5"/>
share|improve this answer
1  
hello, I have read this docs, I will try this or Euguene sollution. Thanks to all for help. Spring is so fine if you now how to use it :-) –  Josef Procházka Jun 6 '12 at 9:27
    
"Spring is so fine if you now how to use it" - totally true. –  Hoàng Long Jun 7 '12 at 3:06
    
I have a question: Is it possible to inject the dependencies to the Service? How? –  Javi Pedrera Dec 4 '12 at 21:24
    
Certainly, you can use @Autowired, @Inject, or any other Spring DI method that you would normally use. –  matsev Dec 4 '12 at 21:39
    
Where myExecutor is used? –  Javi Pedrera Dec 5 '12 at 10:10

One solution could be: in your async thread, write to a DB, and have your checking code check the DB table for progress. You get the additional benefit of persisting performance data for later evaluation.

Also, just use the @Async annotation to kick off the asynchronous thread - makes life easier and is a Spring Way To Do It.

share|improve this answer
    
thaks, that was my first idea, but I need to only show the progres and I dont want to persist any information. Now I am logging the progress to tomcat log and I want to have faster way how to check it. –  Josef Procházka Jun 6 '12 at 9:21

Ignoring synchronization issues you could do something like this:

  private class MessagePrinterTask implements Runnable { 
    private int cn; 

    public int getCN() {
      return cn;
    }

    ...
  }


  public class TaskExecutorExample { 
    MessagePrinterTask printerTask;

    public void printMessages() { 
      printerTask = new MessagePrinterTask();
      taskExecutor.execute(printerTask); 
    }
    ...
  }
share|improve this answer
1  
hello, how do you get the taskExecutor? I have seen that is taken from the context using the .xml. Could you explain more your solution? –  Javi Pedrera Dec 4 '12 at 20:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.