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I have some code that is generated by a Drupal view. It looks like this (stripped down for clarity):

<div class="group_content">
  <h3>Header Link</h3>
  <div class="row odd">Here's some content</div>
  <h3>Another Header Link</h3>
  <div class="row even">Here's some more content</div>
</div>

<div class="group_content">
  <h3>Header Link 2</h3>
  <div class="row odd">Here's some content 2</div>
</div>

Because this is generated by a CMS, there's a limit to what I can do about the rendered code - for example, I can't add an even/odd class to the h3 elements.

How can I (in css) target only the div class=row that is followed by another div class=row? If there are more than one row in a group, I need to add a bottom border to the div to act as a visual separator. So, using my example code, there would be a border applied to div class="row odd">Here's some content</div> because it has another row following it.

I'm a backend developer, so CSS is not my strong suit. We do need to support IE7.

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AFAIK, you cannot assign css to parent based on child.You will need to use javascript for this purpose. –  Jashwant Jun 5 '12 at 15:21
    
The relationship is not parent/child - the divs are not children of the h3, they just follow them. –  EmmyS Jun 5 '12 at 15:24
    
Sorry, my bad. I've added a workaround though –  Jashwant Jun 5 '12 at 15:39
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Modified Logic

Since you need IE7 support, place the border on the h3 element instead:

div.row + h3 {
    border-top: 1px solid black;
}

This will work in just about every modern browser, and IE7:

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jonathansampson/BjUf9/1/

Explicit Subjects in Selectors

If you insist on placing it only on every div.row but the last, that's a different story. You're asking about moving the subject of a selector, which is not currently possible, but will be when browsers implement Level 4 selectors:

div.row! + div.row {
    /* These styles apply to the first div.row
       $div.row + div.row is another potential 
       syntax */
}

:last-child, in IE9+

Since you cannot do that, what you can do is set a style for all div.row elements, adding your border, and then overriding that for any div.row:last-child which will remove that border for any div.row that is the last element in its parent:

div.row {
    border-bottom: 1px solid #333;
}
div.row:last-child {
    border-bottom: 0px;
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jonathansampson/BjUf9/

I should note that this will not work in IE7, unfortunately. But the modified logic presented in the first solution should take care of you there.

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unfortunately last-child doesn't work on IE7 (while first-child works fine) –  Fabrizio Calderan Jun 5 '12 at 15:20
    
Was the WD updated, or are you basing your CSS4 answers off the ED now? (Things like the subject token are why I'm thinking of holding off from any mention of CSS4 in my answers henceforth...) –  BoltClock Jun 5 '12 at 15:23
    
@F.Calderan You're right. I was thinking of the CSS 2.1 selectors. Edit forthcoming. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 5 '12 at 15:25
    
If it just doesn't display in IE7, we'll deal. As long as it doesn't cause anything else to break. –  EmmyS Jun 5 '12 at 15:25
    
@BoltClock I don't recall which used $ and which used !. I generally mention that both syntaxes are floating around. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 5 '12 at 15:28
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you could revert the logic and apply a border-top to .row + .row elements

.row + .row {
   border-top : 1px #ccc solid;
}

the adjacent sibling selector (+) works fine on IE7+

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This works for me on ie7 and others

.row + h3 {
  border-top : 1px black solid;
}
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