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I am studying json and i was wondering if this is the right way to write a multi dimensional json object that is nested.I wrote:

var foo = {
    "logged_in":true,
    "town":"Dublin",
    "state":"Ohio",
    "country":"USA",
    "products":2,
    "0":{
        "pic_id":"1500",
        "description":"Picture of a computer",
        "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/computer.jpg",
        "type":"jpg",
        "childrenimages":2

        "0":{
        "pic_id":"15011",
        "description":"Picture of a cpu",
        "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/mycpu.png",
        "type":"png"
          }
        "1":{
        "pic_id":"15012",
        "description":"Picture of a cpu two",
        "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/thiscpu.png",
        "type":"png"
          }
    },
    "1":{
        "pic_id":"1501",
        "description":"Picture of a cpu",
        "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/cpu.png",
        "type":"png"
    }
};

Is this right or is there a convention i should follow if my object becomes too deeply nested.

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1  
You're assigning an Object value to a variable whose name implies that it holds a String value... –  Šime Vidas Jun 5 '12 at 15:32
    
If you meant "0" and "1" to represent objects in an array you would us array notation [] and don't specify "0" or "1". Something like gist.github.com/2875889 Note, there are lots of little problems with what you have written, which underlines the point made below....don't write JSON. –  James P. Wright Jun 5 '12 at 15:53
    
Thanks James for the Gist. –  Gandalf Jun 5 '12 at 16:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Consider using arrays instead of numerated object.

Arrays in json are defined using [] http://www.json.org/

Here is an example:

var foo = {
    "logged_in":true,
    "town":"Dublin",
    "state":"Ohio",
    "country":"USA",
    "products":
    [
        {
            "pic_id":"1500",
            "description":"Picture of a computer",
            "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/computer.jpg",
            "type":"jpg",
            "childrenimages":
            [
                {
                    "pic_id":"15011",
                    "description":"Picture of a cpu",
                    "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/mycpu.png",
                    "type":"png"
                },
                {
                    "pic_id":"15012",
                    "description":"Picture of a cpu two",
                    "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/thiscpu.png",
                    "type":"png"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "pic_id":"1501",
            "description":"Picture of a cpu",
            "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/cpu.png",
            "type":"png"
        }
    ],
};

(Forgive me if I forgot either closing { or [ or , its pretty hard to type code in SO :p )

This way you dont even need to have counts like

"products":2,

or

"childrenimages":2

You simply do

foo.products.length

or

foo.products[0].childrenimages.length

Good luck :)

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually a sane suggestion, using numeric indexes as object property names makes no sense. –  Andy E Jun 5 '12 at 15:49

Don't write JSON. Seriously, except for simple configuration files, don't write JSON.

You have utilities to convert objects to a JSON string in most languages (if not any).

PHP: json_encode($array);

Javascript: JSON.stringify( obj );

Etc.

Writing JSON manually often leads to syntax errors. The kind that gives you headaches until you see that missing comma or w/e. You have good tools to do this, use them. You could compare to XML, but JSON has no tool (IDEs, text editor) saying "This syntax is wrong" while you're typing it. For example, no editor will tell you that you used a single quote instead of a double.

Just don't write JSON.

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1  
What are your statements against writing JSON? I see no point in your answer. –  skwee357 Jun 5 '12 at 15:38
    
Because writing JSON manually often leads to errors that wouldn't happen if you use the methods provided by most languages. Why risking this kind of error when you can avoid them? –  Florian Margaine Jun 5 '12 at 15:40
    
@skwee you sure ? he is suggesting you to create a native object in the langauge and then stringify json out of it :P so what you are doing is actually writing JSON the WAY WHICH IT DOES NOT FAILS AND ERROS –  darkyen00 Jun 5 '12 at 15:42
    
It's the same argument that XML was never meant to be written by hand. If you knew the proper languages you could write a database by hand, but that would be absurd. The same with JSON. –  James P. Wright Jun 5 '12 at 15:44
    
@JamesP.Wright except JSON doesn't have the same tools to write without syntax error (IDEs, whatever). For example, using single quote instead of double won't tell you "it's wrong" anywhere. –  Florian Margaine Jun 5 '12 at 15:45

That's not actually an array that you have there, that's just an object containing properties that are also objects. You're also missing a few commas so this won't even compile.

What might be more convenient for you in this case is to use both arrays and objects to form your JSON. For Example:

 var this_json_string = {
    "state":"Ohio",
    "country":"USA",
    "products":[
        {
          "pic_id":"1500",
          "description":"Picture of a computer",
        },

        {
          "pic_id":"15011",
          "description":"Picture of a cpu"
        },
        {
          "pic_id":"15012",
          "description":"Picture of a cpu two"
        },
        {
          "pic_id":"1501",
          "description":"Picture of a cpu"
        }
    ]
};
share|improve this answer

Here is the proper format for your data (note i changed some data itself)

{
    "logged_in":true,
    "town":"Dublin",
    "state":"Ohio",
    "country":"USA",
    "products":2,
    "productinfo":[
        {
            "0":{
                "pic_id":"1500",
                "description":"Picture of a computer",
                "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/computer.jpg",
                "type":"jpg",
                "childrenimages":2
            },
            "1":{
                "pic_id":"15011",
                "description":"Picture of a cpu",
                "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/mycpu.png",
                "type":"png"
            },
            "2":{
                "pic_id":"15012",
                "description":"Picture of a cpu two",
                "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/thiscpu.png",
                "type":"png"
            },
            "3":{
                "pic_id":"1501",
                "description":"Picture of a cpu",
                "localion":"img.cloudimages.us/2012/06/02/cpu.png",
                "type":"png"
            }
        }
    ]
}
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