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Say we have a connection to memcache or redis... which style is preferred and why?

MEMCACHE = Memcache.new(...)
REDIS = Redis.new(...)

OR

$memcache = Memcache.new(...)
$redis = Redis.new(...)
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I think this would be a better fit for Code Review. –  Bryan Dunsmore Jun 5 '12 at 16:10
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3 Answers

You might want to use Redis.current More info here

For example, in an initializer:

Redis.current = Redis.new(host: 'localhost', port: 6379)

And then in your other classes:

def stars
  redis.smembers("stars")
end

private

def redis
  Redis.current
end
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Nice solution to 'Do not introduce global variables.' errors by rubocop gem. –  leo Feb 7 at 17:16
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They are not equivalent constructs. Depending on your application, they may or may not be interchangeable, but they are semantically different.

# MEMCACHE is a constant, subject to scoping constraints.
MEMCACHE = Memcache.new(...)

# $memcache is a global variable: declare it anywhere; use it anywhere.
$memcache = Memcache.new(...)
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+1 for the additional info--good point. –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 16:26
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IMO a "constant", because it communicates that it's supposed to be... constant.

Globals don't imply they shouldn't be mutated.

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2  
Yes. Another solution to consider might be to extend the classes to include something like Memcache.connection and Redis.connection, (a bit like ActiveRecord::Base.connection) although it might get a bit verbose to code with those if they are used a lot, but this way the "constants" are attached to their origins. –  Casper Jun 5 '12 at 16:21
    
@Casper Probably even better idea, yep. –  Dave Newton Jun 5 '12 at 16:27
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