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I have a certain array of floats (in Python) that might range from 0 to 100. I want to create a pseudo-color image so that the colors vary from green (corresponding to 0) to red (100). This is similar to pcolor from matplotlib. However, I do not want to use pcolor.

Is there a function like pseudocolorForValue(val,(minval,maxval)) which returns an RGB triple corresponding to the pseudo-color value for 'val'? Also, is there a flexibility in this function to choose whether to display colors from green-to-red or from red-to-green?

Thanks, Nik

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could write your own function that converted 0..100 to 0..120 degrees and then used that value as the H (or angle) of a color in the HLS (or HSV) colorspace. This could then be converted into an RGB color for display purposes.

Update:

Good news, turns out that Python has colorspace conversion routines in its built-in colorsys module (they really mean "batteries included"). What's nice about that is that it makes creating a function that does what I described fairly easy, as illustrated below:

import colorsys

def pseudocolor(val, minval, maxval):
    # convert val in range minval..maxval to the range 0..120 degrees which
    # correspond to the colors red..green in the HSV colorspace
    h = (float(val-minval) / (maxval-minval)) * 120
    # convert hsv color (h,1,1) to its rgb equivalent
    # note: the hsv_to_rgb() function expects h to be in the range 0..1 not 0..360
    r, g, b = colorsys.hsv_to_rgb(h/360, 1., 1.)
    return r, g, b

if __name__ == '__main__':
    steps = 10
    print 'val       R      G      B'
    for val in xrange(0, 100+steps, steps):
        print '%3d -> (%.3f, %.3f, %.3f)' % ((val,) + pseudocolor(val, 0, 100))

Output:

val       R      G      B
  0 -> (1.000, 0.000, 0.000)
 10 -> (1.000, 0.200, 0.000)
 20 -> (1.000, 0.400, 0.000)
 30 -> (1.000, 0.600, 0.000)
 40 -> (1.000, 0.800, 0.000)
 50 -> (1.000, 1.000, 0.000)
 60 -> (0.800, 1.000, 0.000)
 70 -> (0.600, 1.000, 0.000)
 80 -> (0.400, 1.000, 0.000)
 90 -> (0.200, 1.000, 0.000)
100 -> (0.000, 1.000, 0.000)

Here's a sample showing what its output looks like:

sample showing color interpolation in HSV colorspace

I think you may find the colors generated nicer than in my other answer.

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Thanks. Interesting suggestion. Though it is hard to believe that a function such as the one I need, is not already built in Python. Afterall, pcolor in matplotlib does the same thing. So it must be calling such a function somehow. Are you aware of such a function? –  Nik Jun 5 '12 at 21:59
    
@Nik: No, I'm not aware of a built-in, and frankly am not surprised there isn't one -- it's so domain-specific. The only non-trivial part is the color conversion which you should be able to find in a basic computer graphics book or online. There's probably an open-source graphics package available with such a utility in it you could use. –  martineau Jun 6 '12 at 2:03
    
@Nik: Python has built-in colorspace conversion functions -- see my update to this answer. –  martineau Jun 6 '12 at 14:56

While arguably not as pretty as interpolating H in the HLS or HSV colorspace, a much simpler to implement approach would be to write a function that mapped the single value into three components corresponding to a linearly-interpolated color between completely red (1,0,0) and completely green (0,1,0) in the RGB colorspace.

Here's what I mean:

def pseudocolor(val, minval, maxval):
    # convert val in range minval...maxval to range 0..1
    f = float(val-minval) / (maxval-minval)
    # linearly interpolate that value between the colors red and green
    r, g, b = 1-f, f, 0.
    return r, g, b

if __name__ == '__main__':
    steps = 10
    print 'val       R      G      B'
    for val in xrange(0, 100+steps, steps):
        print '%3d -> (%.3f, %.3f, %.3f)' % ((val,) + pseudocolor(val, 0, 100))

Output:

val       R      G      B
  0 -> (1.000, 0.000, 0.000)
 10 -> (0.900, 0.100, 0.000)
 20 -> (0.800, 0.200, 0.000)
 30 -> (0.700, 0.300, 0.000)
 40 -> (0.600, 0.400, 0.000)
 50 -> (0.500, 0.500, 0.000)
 60 -> (0.400, 0.600, 0.000)
 70 -> (0.300, 0.700, 0.000)
 80 -> (0.200, 0.800, 0.000)
 90 -> (0.100, 0.900, 0.000)
100 -> (0.000, 1.000, 0.000)

You can transform the floating-point r,g,b components as needed, such as to integers in the range of 0..255.

Here's a sample showing what its output looks like:

image showing interpolation in RGB colorspace

If you want to go from green to red, just reverse the calculations for r and g in the function. Also, without too much additional effort, you could generalize the concept to allow linear-interpolation between any two given colors. Note that the sample code hasn't been optimized at all so what it's doing would be clearer.

Hope this helps.

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Thanks @martineau. This really helped! –  Nik Jun 6 '12 at 4:57

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