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I want to remove duplicate words/strings from a large tab separated file using Linux commands.

names            john, cnn, mac, tommy, mac, patrick, ngc, discovery, john, cnn, adam, patrick
cities            san jose, santa clara, san franscisco, new york, san jose, santa clara

The above is the file format, I want to retain the tabs and commas after removing the duplicate words.

names            john, cnn, mac, tommy, patrick, ngc, discovery, adam
cities            san jose, santa clara, san franscisco, new york

Any help would be appreciated.

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Is order of names important? –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Jun 5 '12 at 16:58
    
No, but the tabs and commas are important. –  Kaartz Jun 5 '12 at 17:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
awk 'BEGIN {
         FS = ", |\t"
     }
     {
          printf "%s\t", $1
          delim = ""
          for (i = 2; i <= NF; i++) {
              if (! ($i in seen)) {
                  printf "%s%s", delim, $i
                  delim = ", "
              }
              seen[$i]
          }
          printf "\n"
          delete seen
     }' inputfile

If you're not using GNU AWK (gawk) then you can't delete the array, use split("", array) instead.

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Thank you so much Dennis. Your script worked like a charm! But in the output tabs are gone, and I get a comma with space. names , john, cnn, mac, tommy, patrick, ngc, discovery, adam –  Kaartz Jun 5 '12 at 17:56
    
@Kaartz: That's odd. It works correctly for me. Double check to make sure the input file has tabs. Also, make sure you're using the current version of the script from my answer. I quickly added the delim feature after posting the first version without it. What version of AWK are you using? What OS/distribution? –  Dennis Williamson Jun 5 '12 at 18:35
    
I fixed it by adding printf "%s\t\t\t\t", $1. Thank you so much for this script. –  Kaartz Jun 6 '12 at 8:25

sed and awk by themselves aren't particularly well suited for this. uniq is better.

First pull out the names into another file, say names. You can use sed for this:

head -1 inputfile | sed 's/^names\s*//g' > names

So now names contains john, cnn, mac, tommy, mac, patrick, ngc, discovery, john, cnn, adam, patrick.

Then use this:

awk 'BEGIN{RS=","}{print $0}' names | sort | uniq | awk 'BEGIN{ORS=","}{print $0}'

Output is adam,cnn,discovery,john,mac,ngc,patrick,tommy,. You can remove the last comma also if you want using sed. Of course you can pipe the output of the head command to the second awk also. In that case, you won't need the intermediate names file.

Same for cities. I am assuming order is not important for you.

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sort | uniq can be replaced by sort -u on most linux boxes. I don't know how portable across Unix this is, it works on my Solaris box. –  rahmu Jun 5 '12 at 17:05

This might work for you:

sed -i ':a;s/\(\(\<[^,]*\),.*\)\( \2,*\)/\1/;ta;s/,$//' /tmp/a
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