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I have this little rake task:

namespace :db do 
  namespace :test do 
    task :reset do 
      ENV['RAILS_ENV'] = "test" 
      Rake::Task['db:drop'].invoke
      Rake::Task['db:create'].invoke
      Rake::Task['db:migrate'].invoke
    end
  end
end

Now, when I execute, it will ignore the RAILS_ENV I tried to hard-code. How do I make this task work as expected

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6 Answers 6

up vote 36 down vote accepted

For this particular task, you only need to change the DB connection, so as Adam pointed out, you can do this:

namespace :db do 
  namespace :test do 
    task :reset do 
      ActiveRecord::Base.establish_connection('test')
      Rake::Task['db:drop'].invoke
      Rake::Task['db:create'].invoke
      Rake::Task['db:migrate'].invoke
      ActiveRecord::Base.establish_connection(ENV['RAILS_ENV'])  #Make sure you don't have side-effects!
    end
  end
end

If your task is more complicated, and you need other aspects of ENV, you are safest spawning a new rake process:

namespace :db do 
  namespace :test do 
    task :reset do 
      system("rake db:drop RAILS_ENV=test")
      system("rake db:create RAILS_ENV=test")
      system("rake db:migrate RAILS_ENV=test")
    end
  end
end

or

namespace :db do 
  namespace :test do 
    task :reset do 
      if (ENV['RAILS_ENV'] == "test")
        Rake::Task['db:drop'].invoke
        Rake::Task['db:create'].invoke
        Rake::Task['db:migrate'].invoke
      else
        system("rake db:test:reset RAILS_ENV=test")
      end
    end
  end
end
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1  
yes this looks a bit less hacky than mucking around with RAILS_ENV –  Sam Saffron Jul 7 '09 at 5:32
1  
For me invoking extra Rake processes looks much more hacky. –  Adam Byrtek Jul 7 '09 at 19:46
1  
It's better than having your task mess with the environment in a destructive way. If you do it this way you can use it as a dependency in another task without causing a total catastrophe. Want to run a rake task in test mode? Run the task in test mode. Trying to fake test mode, and them probably change it all back to whatever mode you're actually in afterward is sketchy. –  Michael Sofaer Jul 7 '09 at 19:56
1  
I see your point. I was curious I've just checked how it's done in default Rails db:test tasks and looks like they don't redefine RAILS_ENV but change the database connection manually: ActiveRecord::Base.establish_connection(:test) –  Adam Byrtek Jul 7 '09 at 20:05
    
I find it interesting, that in order to get this to work properly with a rake db:reset, I HAD to use the "system" version of this answer. The others all failed miserably, usually wiping out my development database. –  wndxlori Jun 17 at 17:55

In Rails 3, you'll have to use

Rails.env = "test"
Rake::Task["db:drop"].invoke

instead of

RAILS_ENV = "test"
Rake::Task["db:drop"].invoke 
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The cleanest and simplest solution would be to redefine RAILS_ENV (not ENV['RAILS_ENV'])

namespace :db do
  namespace :test do  
    task :reset do 
      RAILS_ENV = "test" 
      Rake::Task['db:drop'].invoke
      Rake::Task['db:create'].invoke
      Rake::Task['db:migrate'].invoke
    end
  end
end

During the boot process of a Rails application RAILS_ENV is initialized as follows

RAILS_ENV = (ENV['RAILS_ENV'] || 'development').dup unless defined?(RAILS_ENV)

The rest of Rails code uses RAILS_ENV directly.

However, as Michael has pointed out in a comment to his answer, switching RAILS_ENV on the fly can be risky. Another approach would be to switch the database connection, this solution is in fact used by the default db:test tasks

ActiveRecord::Base.establish_connection(:test)
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The best way of course is to specify the environment from the command line when you run the rake task, but if for some reason that's not what you want to do, you can do this:

ENV["RAILS_ENV"] = 'test'
RAILS_ENV.replace('test') if defined?(RAILS_ENV)

load "#{RAILS_ROOT}/config/environment.rb"

And that should do the trick.

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You may just be able to require 'config/environment' instead of reloading it. –  ealdent Jul 7 '09 at 3:13
    
What a hack, works like a champ. –  Sam Saffron Jul 7 '09 at 3:15
    
it seems to be working for the rake task without the require or load ... –  Sam Saffron Jul 7 '09 at 3:17
    
Cool, even easier! –  ealdent Jul 7 '09 at 3:20

Another option is to check the env and refuse to continue:

unless Rails.env.development?
  puts "This task can only be run in development environment"
  exit
end

or ask if they really want to continue:

unless Rails.env.development?
  puts "You are using #{Rails.env} environment, are you sure? y/n"
  continue = STDIN.gets.chomp
  exit unless continue == 'y'
end
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There is some strange code in database_tasks.rb:

  def each_current_configuration(environment)
    environments = [environment]
    environments << 'test' if environment == 'development'

    configurations = ActiveRecord::Base.configurations.values_at(*environments)
    configurations.compact.each do |configuration|
      yield configuration unless configuration['database'].blank?
    end
  end

It always adds test if env is development. I solved the case of wanting to do a custom db:rebuild task for simultaneous development and test by running development first, and test second. In addition, before running the tasks, I call my set_env method which makes sure to set ActiveRecord::Tasks::DatabaseTasks.env, without this, the database connections don't seem to be handled discretely for environments as expected. I tried all other sorts of disconnect etc, but this worked without further code.

def set_env(env)
  Rails.env = env.to_s
  ENV['RAILS_ENV'] = env.to_s
  ActiveRecord::Tasks::DatabaseTasks.env = env.to_s
end

Here is a gist of my full db.rake file with simultaneous multi-environment db:rebuild and db:truncate

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