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I'm looking into IP multicasting at the moment, and determining the number of unique multicast groups required to address all possible combinations of N hosts.

For instance, if we have 3 end hosts (A, B, C), a total of 4 multicast groups would need to be created to enable all possible combinations of these hosts to be addressed (AB, AC, BC, ABC), excluding instances where 1 or 0 hosts are being addressed.

As far as I can tell, the number of unique groups excluding instances where 1 or 0 hosts are being addressed can be expressed as [2^N - (N + 1)], where N = the number of hosts.

However, I'm interested in looking at how many groups exist when only at least a certain percentage of systems are addressed.

For instance, if we had 5 systems, we would have a total of 26 multicast groups. However, if we excluded groups where 3 or fewer systems were being addressed (only looking at groups were 4 or all systems are addressed), we would have only 6 groups. I can determine this by hand, as shown below.

Is there a formula I can use to calculate this instead? So, if we have N hosts and want to create only multicast groups which include Y hosts or greater, it means we have Z multicast groups. In the above example, Y = 4, Z is determined to be 6.

Any assistance or feedback is always appreciated

1 with 0 bits set
00 - 00000

5 with 1 bit set
01 - 00001
02 - 00010
04 - 00100
08 - 01000
16 - 10000

10 with 2 bits set
03 - 00011
05 - 00101
06 - 00110
09 - 01001
10 - 01010
12 - 01100
18 - 10010
20 - 10100
17 - 10001
24 - 11000

10 with 3 bits set
07 - 00111
11 - 01011
13 - 01101
14 - 01110
19 - 10011
21 - 10101
22 - 10110
25 - 11001
26 - 11010
28 - 11100

5 with 4 bits set
15 - 01111
23 - 10111
27 - 11011
29 - 11101
30 - 11110

1 with 5 bits set
31 - 11111
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"However, if we excluded groups where 3 or fewer systems were being addressed (only looking at groups were 4 or all systems are addressed), we would have only 5 groups." -- wouldn't that be 6 groups (5 with 4 systems plus 1 with 5 systems)? –  hatchet Jun 5 '12 at 17:36
    
@hatchet Yep -- good catch. I'll update my question. –  BSchlinker Jun 5 '12 at 17:48
    
This topic is covered here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combination –  hatchet Jun 5 '12 at 17:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Treating this like a combination problem should help. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combination

Out of N bits you want to know the sum of combinations where you have Y to N bits set.

Something like this pseudo-code:

for k from Y..N
  total += (N choose k)

Where N choose k can be calculated as N! / (k! * (N-k)!)

For your example you would get:

5 choose 4 = 5
5 choose 5 = 1
--------------
     total = 6
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Your formula for calculating N choose k appears wrong?: bit.ly/KCfPHZ vs. bit.ly/M4U671 –  BSchlinker Jun 5 '12 at 19:05
    
@BSchlinker Needs parentheses for the computer, N! / (k!*(N-k)!). Works without parentheses for humans knowing the formula ;) –  Daniel Fischer Jun 5 '12 at 19:10
    
I always evaluate using PEMDAS moving left to right. Seems like the parentheses are required regardless, no? (Then again, I guess there is no set standard: bit.ly/fbEZEz) –  BSchlinker Jun 5 '12 at 19:12
    
@BSchlinker I updated the formula to include parentheses for clarity. Since I've never used a programming language with a factorial operator (at least that I'm aware of) I wasn't thinking about the order of operations. –  dwikle Jun 5 '12 at 19:47
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Sum[i=0 to N] N{C}i = Sum of all combinations of i hosts out of N hosts = 2^N
--- [1] 
Sum[i=0 to Y] N{C}i = Sum of all combinations of multicast groups with Y or fewer hosts, including single hosts. 
--- [2] 

You are looking for ([1] - [2]).

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Sorry, I don't understand the notation N{C}i.. edit It appears that is what you are performing the summation over? Could you please give an example of the use of your formula to remove any confusion from my end? –  BSchlinker Jun 5 '12 at 17:52
    
N{C}i = N choose i. In your example, 5 choose 2 = 10. If you Google 5 choose 2, it will even calculate the answer for you. –  hatchet Jun 5 '12 at 17:54
    
All combinations of choosing i hosts out of a total of N hosts. The wikipedia link provided by @hatchet will give you exact details. –  Bhaskar Jun 5 '12 at 17:54
    
The sum for all i from 0 to N is 2^N, since N choose 0 is 1. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 5 '12 at 19:09
    
@DanielFischer Updated my response on your feedback. –  Bhaskar Jun 6 '12 at 20:50
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