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I think there's something basic that I'm not understanding(new to C) regarding strings. Basically I am using uthash and it works when I send strings directly but not from a loop(thats getting its data from an array).

Here's an example:

enum { MAX_ID_LEN = 5 };
struct my_struct {
    char id[MAX_ID_LEN];                    /* key */
    float price;
    UT_hash_handle hh;         /* makes this structure hashable */
};
struct my_struct *users = NULL;

void new_stock(char *user_id, float price) {
    //printf("%c - %f \n", *user_id, price);
    struct my_struct *s;

    s = (struct my_struct*)malloc(sizeof(struct my_struct));
    strcpy(s->id, user_id);
    s->price = price;
    HASH_ADD_STR( users, id, s );  /* id: name of key field */
}
int main() {
    printf("starting.. \n");
    new_stock("IBM", 10.2);
    new_stock("goog", 2.2);
    return 0;
}

That works but when I try to do the same thing from an array it does not(I get no errors when compiling).

char *name_all[] =  {"ibm", "goog"};
int name_all_size =sizeof(name_all)/sizeof(char); 
float price_all[] =  {10.2, 2.2};

enum { MAX_ID_LEN = 5 };
struct my_struct {
    char id[MAX_ID_LEN];                    /* key */
    float price;
    UT_hash_handle hh;         /* makes this structure hashable */
};

struct my_struct *users = NULL;


void insert_data() {
    printf("inserting data \n");
    int data_loc;
    for (data_loc=0;data_loc<name_all_size;data_loc++) {
        //printf("%s - %f \n", name_all[data_loc], price_all[data_loc]);
        //new_stock(name_all[data_loc], price_all[data_loc]);
        //new try
        struct my_struct *s;
        s = (struct my_struct*)malloc(sizeof(struct my_struct));
        strcpy(s->id, name_all[data_loc]);
        s->price = price_all[data_loc];
        //printf("%s - %f \n", s->id, s->price); //ahh displays correctly but still fails
        HASH_ADD_STR( users, id, s );  /* id: name of key field */

    }
}

int main() {
    insert_data();
        return 0;
}

I'm new to C so I am probably assessing this wrong but I think it has to do with the way I'm passing the variables. When I first tried I was sending it to the new_stock function but it was only displaying the first char, so to get around the problem of passing the variable I just moved all the contents of the function into the function I was using to add all the data to but I still get the same problem.

Any idea of what I'm doing wrong?

also just out of personal interest is there any tools that warns me of problems in my code? I find gcc is helpful but once the warnings stop I have no idea how to troubleshoot. Is there something that could help me catch problems like this earlier(something more verbose than gcc). Not sure if its possible but wanted to ask.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's your error:

char *name_all[] =  {"ibm", "goog"};
int name_all_size =sizeof(name_all)/sizeof(char);

The array name_all is an array of char pointers, not char, and therefore will only be eight-bytes if you're on a 32-bit system with 32-bit pointers, and 16-bytes on a 64-bit system with 64-bit pointers. Keep in mind that the string literals being pointed to are not stored in the array, only the pointers to the string literals are in the array. What you really want is:

int name_all_size = sizeof(name_all)/sizeof(char*);
                                            ^^^^^ note the pointer type

That should give you a value of 2, which is the correct number of elements in name_all.

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wow..it works now..but I'm more confused. The way I had it, it was still printing the data correctly(using that printf). Like, it was listing all the data just not adding them to the hash map –  Error_404 Jun 5 '12 at 17:50
    
Well, you are going past the end of an array of pointers, and therefore pretty much anything could be happening with the data that is being injected in those memory locations via strcpy ... for instance, you may have been writing over the hash-map itself, or some other memory associated with control over the hash-map. Keep in mind that strcpy only stops when it finds a NULL terminating value, so once you start reading pointers beyond the end of the array that are not pointing to NULL-terminated strings, anything goes ... –  Jason Jun 5 '12 at 17:54
    
ok, I think I get it now, it actually was kind of working as expected but it just kept going on because I didn't calculate the size right and was failing after. –  Error_404 Jun 5 '12 at 17:55
    
I'm actually surprised you didn't crash or seg-fault ... –  Jason Jun 5 '12 at 17:56
    
yea no error or anything..it compiled fine. –  Error_404 Jun 5 '12 at 17:57
char *name_all[] =  {"ibm", "goog"};
int name_all_size =sizeof(name_all)/sizeof(char);

name_all is an array of two char*. So sizeof name_all is 2*sizeof(char*), which usually is eight or sixteen, depending on whether you're on a 32 or a 64-bit system. sizeof(char) is 1 by definition. So in

for (data_loc=0;data_loc<name_all_size;data_loc++) {
    //printf("%s - %f \n", name_all[data_loc], price_all[data_loc]);
    //new_stock(name_all[data_loc], price_all[data_loc]);
    //new try
    struct my_struct *s;
    s = (struct my_struct*)malloc(sizeof(struct my_struct));
    strcpy(s->id, name_all[data_loc]);
    s->price = price_all[data_loc];
    //printf("%s - %f \n", s->id, s->price); //ahh displays correctly but still fails
    HASH_ADD_STR( users, id, s );  /* id: name of key field */

}

you are accessing past the end of the array name_all.

Did you mean to divide by sizeof(char*) in name_all_size?

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+1, thanks so much Daniel. It makes sense. –  Error_404 Jun 5 '12 at 17:55

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