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8 bits representing the number 7 look like this:

00000111

Three bits are set.

What are algorithms to determine the number of set bits in a 32-bit integer?

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45  
This is the Hamming weight BTW. –  Purfideas Sep 20 '08 at 19:17
5  
What's a real-world application for this? (This isn't to be taken as a criticism--I'm just curious.) –  jonmorgan Dec 10 '10 at 20:59
5  
Calculation of parity bit (look it up), which was used as simple error detection in communication. –  Dialecticus Dec 11 '10 at 0:28
5  
@Dialecticus, calculating a parity bit is cheaper than calculating the Hamming weight –  finnw May 12 '11 at 12:14
8  
@spookyjon Let's say you have a graph represented as an adjacency matrix, which is essentially a bit set. If you want to calculate the number of edges of a vertex, it boils down to calculating the Hamming weight of one row in the bit set. –  FUZxxl Oct 10 '11 at 16:02

38 Answers 38

A simple way which should work nicely for a small amount of bits it something like this (For 4 bits in this example):

(i & 1) + (i & 2)/2 + (i & 4)/4 + (i & 8)/8

Would others recommend this for a small number of bits as a simple solution?

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Here's something that works in PHP (all PHP intergers are 32 bit signed, thus 31 bit):

function bits_population($nInteger)
{

    $nPop=0;
    while($nInteger)
    {
        $nInteger^=(1<<(floor(1+log($nInteger)/log(2))-1));
        $nPop++;
    }
    return $nPop;
}
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// How about the following:
public int CountBits(int value)
{
    int count = 0;
    while (value > 0)
    {
        if (value & 1)
            count++;
        value <<= 1;
    }
    return count;
}
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1  
Isn't that shifting value in the wrong direction? –  Vickster Nov 28 '12 at 10:47

Here is the sample code, which might be useful.

private static final int[] bitCountArr = new int[]{0, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 5, 6, 6, 7, 6, 7, 7, 8};
private static final int firstByteFF = 255;
public static final int getCountOfSetBits(int value){
    int count = 0;
    for(int i=0;i<4;i++){
        if(value == 0) break;
        count += bitCountArr[value & firstByteFF];
        value >>>= 8;
    }
    return count;
}
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I am giving two algorithms to answer the question,

  package countSetBitsInAnInteger;

    import java.util.Scanner;

    public class UsingLoop {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        try{
        System.out.println("Enter a integer number to check for set bits in it");
        int n = in.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Using while loop, we get the number of set bits as: "+usingLoop(n));
        System.out.println("Using Brain Kernighan's Algorithm, we get the number of set bits as: "+usingBrainKernighan(n));
        System.out.println("Using ");
        }
        finally{
        in.close();
        }
    }
    private static int usingBrainKernighan(int n) {
        int count = 0;
        while(n>0){
            n&=(n-1);
            count++;
        }
        return count;
    }/*
    Analysis:
        Time complexity = O(lgn)
        Space complexity = O(1)
    */
    private static int usingLoop(int n) {
        int count = 0;
        for(int i=0;i<32;i++){
            if((n&(1<<i))!=0)
                count++;
        }
        return count;
    }
    /*
    Analysis:
        Time Complexity = O(32) // Maybe the complexity is O(lgn)
        Space Complexity = O(1)
    */
    }
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#!/user/local/bin/perl


    $c=0x11BBBBAB;
     $count=0;
     $m=0x00000001;
    for($i=0;$i<32;$i++)
    {
        $f=$c & $m;
        if($f == 1)
        {
            $count++;
        }
        $c=$c >> 1;
    }
    printf("%d",$count);

ive done it through a perl script. the number taken is $c=0x11BBBBAB   
B=3 1s   
A=2 1s   
so in total  
1+1+3+3+3+2+3+3=19
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2  
Is there something special about this implementation? The accepted answer is obviously much more efficient than your answer, so how is this a "best" solution (as requested in the question)? –  Simon MᶜKenzie Jun 7 '12 at 6:50

You can do something like:

int countSetBits(int n)
{
    n=((n&0xAAAAAAAA)>>1) + (n&0x55555555);
    n=((n&0xCCCCCCCC)>>2) + (n&0x33333333);
    n=((n&0xF0F0F0F0)>>4) + (n&0x0F0F0F0F);
    n=((n&0xFF00FF00)>>8) + (n&0x00FF00FF);
    return n;
}

int main()
{
    int n=10;
    printf("Number of set bits: %d",countSetBits(n));
     return 0;
}

See heer: http://ideone.com/JhwcX

The working can be explained as follows:

First, all the even bits are shifted towards right & added with the odd bits to count the number of bits in group of two. Then we work in group of two, then four & so on..

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I use the following function. Haven't checked benchmarks, but it works.

int msb(int num)
{
    int m = 0;
    for (int i = 16; i > 0; i = i>>1)
    {
        // debug(i, num, m);
        if(num>>i)
        {
            m += i;
            num>>=i;
        }
    }
    return m;
}
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