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How do I print all prime numbers in a given range? Here is the code that I tried, but it's not giving the correct output:

for {set x 2} {$x<100} {incr x} {

    for {set i 2} {$i<$x} {incr i} {

        set y [expr $x % $i]
        set flag 0
        if {$y == 0}  {
            puts "$x:not a prime no"
            incr flag
            break   
        }
    }

    if {$flag ==1} {
        puts "$x: prime no"
    }
}
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2  
Typical homework. Trivially googleable –  kostix Jun 5 '12 at 18:21
    

3 Answers 3

Finding prime numbers is something that is pretty well explained out there[1][2], so I'll explain a bit more about how you should be thinking in order to work out the solution. Like that, I hope you'll be better able to answer such problems yourself in the future.

To start with, you've got two problems here. One problem is how to discover if a particular number is a prime number, and another problem is how to find all the prime numbers in a given range. These two are indeed linked: we can use the solution to one to solve the other. Let's start by doing that. (This is pseudocode, not Tcl!)

# Start at 2; 1 is defined to be a non-prime
for every i in 2 up to 100
    if (isPrime i)
        print i, " is prime"
    else
        print i, " is not prime"
    end if
end for

Next, we need a mechanism for that isPrime. It's something that's best written as a named subprogram (a procedure in Tcl). We'll use the simplest technique here, a primality test by simple-minded trial division.

function isPrime (integer x) : boolean
    # Note, when x is 2, this loop does *zero* steps
    for every i in 2 up to x-1
        if (x mod i = 0)
            # Early exit from function; we know the answer to do more work!
            return false
        end if
    end for
    return true
end function

That's not efficient (you can stop earlier, you can keep a cache of what smaller primes have already been found and only check against those, etc.) but it will work. Now all you need to do is convert the above to Tcl. There's a pretty straight-forward one-to-one conversion strategy.

But the important part is to break the overall challenge down into simpler pieces that you can solve in a way that is so simple you can't get it wrong.


Side note: you should also brace your expressions in Tcl! Not doing so is occasionally useful in advanced programming, but it's almost always just a bug waiting to happen. It has the benefit of allowing the built-in compiler to turn the expression into fast code.

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Donal has already given the best answer, but just so you know there were a few small errors in your code. I've tidied it up for you.

for {set x 2} {$x<100} {incr x} {
    set flag 1
    for {set i 2} {$i<$x} {incr i} {
        set y [expr $x % $i]
        if {$y == 0}  {
            puts "$x: not a prime no"
            set flag 0
            break   
        }
    }

    if {$flag ==1} {
        puts "$x: prime no"
    }
}
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I was specifically not going to do that. “Homework” questions should be answered in a way whereby the questioner still has to work at it; the very act of providing as much support as you're giving lessens what they learn. –  Donal Fellows Jun 6 '12 at 20:46
    
Ah, the old justice versus mercy question! In this case, I chose mercy :-) –  TrojanName Jun 7 '12 at 8:59

this code will gives you the inputed single number is prime or not. You can give input from 1.. and executed above some code but I did't get proper output

puts "Enter n value : "
gets stdin n
set i 1
set count 0
while {$i <= $n} {
set y [expr $n % $i]
if {$y == 0} {
incr count
incr i
} else {
incr i
}
}
if {$count == 2} {
puts "Given number is prime"
} else {
puts "Given number is not a prime"
}
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I moved your comment to the post. So please, delete your comment. –  reporter Jun 24 '14 at 8:49

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