Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

[Compiler: Delphi XE2]

I have spent all day yesterday trying all sorts of ways to accomplish this specific task but they have all ended in the same result.

Using TRZCheckGroup and this example to see what has been checked ect..

procedure TFrmMain.cbOptionsChange(Sender: TObject; Index: Integer; NewState: TCheckBoxState);
var
  ItmIndex0, ItmIndex1: Integer;
begin
  { Initialize ItemIndex's }
  ItmIndex0 := -1;
  ItmIndex1 := -1;

  { Return the position Index of the string's(0 and 1) }
  ItmIndex0 := cbOptions.Items.IndexOf('One');
  ItmIndex1 := cbOptions.Items.IndexOf('Two');

  { Which CheckBox has been Checked } 
  cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex0] := True;
  cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex1] := False;
end;

NOTE: ^This is not my Final code just an example of how i am dealing with the CheckBoxes.

things like -

if cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex0] then
  cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex1] := False
else cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex1] := True;

They work the first time then it always evaluates to true which i understand why. The else bit will only be in action when i un-check the first CheckBox, which is obviously not my desired result.

Seems the Event stops working and on some of my attempts it has fired twice for some reason.

The NewState Param on cbListOptionsChange, what is this and can it help me in anyway?

Any help on this will be much appreciated.

Thanks.

if cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex0] then
  cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex1] := False
else if cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex1] then
  cbOptions.ItemChecked[ItmIndex0] := False;

See something like this if the second CheckBox is checked then i check the first one it works as required, but then obviously after that you cannot check the second CheckBox no more.


Ken White - Snippet(Working). Replaced the name of the component with Default as people could get confused else, sometimes helps with default naming to save future questions.

procedure TForm1.RzCheckGroup1Change(Sender: TObject; Index: Integer; NewState: TCheckBoxState);
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  // Keep this event from being fired again while we're here.
  // Your code isn't clear about what the actual name of the
  // component or this event, (the event is named `cbListOptionsChange`,
  // but your code references `cbOptions` - I don't know which is
  // correct, so change it if needed in the next line and
  // the one in the `finally` block below. I'm using `cbListOptions`
  // here.
  RzCheckGroup1.OnChange := nil;

  try
    // If we're getting notified of a new item being checked...
    if NewState = cbChecked then
    begin
      // Iterate through the items, unchecking all that aren't
      // at the index that just became checked.
      // I wouldn't use `for..in`, because the ordering works better here
      for i := 0 to RzCheckGroup1.Items.Count - 1 do
        if i <> Index then
          RzCheckGroup1.ItemChecked[i] := False; // Ryan - Just changed to this from this cbListOptions.Items[i].Checked := False;
    end;

    // Ryan - Uncomment these two lines if you want one of them to be Checked at all times, this will set the CheckBox you are trying to Uncheck to Checked. 
    //if not RzCheckGroup1.ItemChecked[Index] then
    //  RzCheckGroup1.ItemChecked[Index] := True;

  finally
    // Reconnect the event
    RzCheckGroup1.OnChange := RzCheckGroup1Change;
  end;
end;
share|improve this question
4  
You've chosen the wrong control. The struggles you have had are a result of that error. The correct control for mutually exclusive choice is a radio group. –  David Heffernan Jun 5 '12 at 19:28
1  
You should also pay more attention to the compiler warnings. The code that initialises ItmIndex0 and ItmIndex1 is pointless and the compiler will tell you so. –  David Heffernan Jun 5 '12 at 19:30
    
Yea i know TRadioGroup will be best suited and give me the result i need but i want to use CheckBoxes really. And i get 0 Warnings Or Hints when i do a Compile or Build so im not really sure what you mean :S –  Se7en Jun 5 '12 at 19:36
    
Using check boxes will confuse your users, but I guess you know that. And the code in the Q will emit warnings. Value assigned to ItmIndex0 is never used. –  David Heffernan Jun 5 '12 at 19:45
2  
The very fact that you assign another value before reading the first is why the warning appears. Perhaps you disabled warnings. The fact this is a struggle for you is simply justice being handed down for your UI crime!! ;-) You can make it work. Use Ken's code but disable the OnChange handlers whilst you modify the Checked properties. I'd use a re-entrancy guard in the OnChange handler. A global field that blocks re-entrant execution that was causing your stack overflow. –  David Heffernan Jun 5 '12 at 20:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with TRZCheckGroup, but your current code will always check the item at ItmIndex0 and uncheck the other.

TCheckBoxState is defined in the Delphi documentation as

TCheckBoxState = (
  cbUnchecked,
  cbChecked,
  cbGrayed
);

So NewState appears to tell you the newly set state of the CheckBox, and Index tells you which checkbox is changing. Most of the time, cbGrayed isn't used, because it indicates the value has never been set; it's usually only useful when you're reading a BOOLEAN (or bit) column in a database and it's NULL.

This event isn't meant really to alternate the state of two checkboxes, it would appear; it's meant to just let you react when a single item (among the group of items) changes it's state:

procedure TFrmMain.cbListOptionsChange(Sender: TObject; Index: Integer; 
  NewState: TCheckBoxState);
begin
  case NewState of
    cbUnchecked: // Do whatever when cbOptions.Items[Index] is unchecked
    cbChecked:   // Do whatever when cbOptions.Items[Index] is checked
    cbGrayed:    // Usually ignored unless NULL in db column is indicated
  end;
end;

To just reverse the state of two checkboxes (changing one to the alternate state and the other to it's opposite), you can use something like this (uses two standard TCheckBox controls with the same event defined for both of their OnClick events):

procedure TFrmMain.CheckBoxClick(Sender: Object);
var
  ChkBox: TCheckBox;
  BoxToToggle: TCheckBox;
begin
  // If you're sure the event is only for TCheckBox
  ChangingBox := TCheckBox(Sender);
  // If there's a chance it's used for something else
  // if (Sender is TCheckBox) then
  // begin
  //   ChangingBox := TCheckBox(Sender); 
  //   
  // or
  //   ChangingBox := Sender as TCheckBox


  if ChangingBox = CheckBox1 then
    BoxToToggle := CheckBox2
  else
    BoxToToggle := CheckBox1;

  // Disable this event for both checkboxes, so it doesn't
  // fire recursively
  ChangingBox.OnClick := nil;
  BoxToToggle.OnClick := nil;
  try
    BoxToToggle.Checked := not ChangingBox.Checked;
  finally
    // Reconnect event handlers
    ChangingBox.OnClick := CheckBoxClick;
    BoxToToggle.OnClick := CheckBoxClick; 
  end;

However, if you're just dealing with a list of items where one should be checked and all the others unchecked, you should be using a TRadioGroup instead. It gives you this behavior automatically. Using checkboxes is against the normal Windows GUI behavior, and will confuse your users.

With that being said (and with my strong objections to doing this!), and untested because I don't have the component you're using, you can try this (this is SO against my better judgement to even write!):

procedure TFrmMain.cbListOptionsChange(Sender: TObject; Index: Integer; 
  NewState: TCheckBoxState);
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  // Keep this event from being fired again while we're here.
  // Your code isn't clear about what the actual name of the
  // component or this event, (the event is named `cbListOptionsChange`,
  // but your code references `cbOptions` - I don't know which is
  // correct, so change it if needed in the next line and
  // the one in the `finally` block below. I'm using `cbListOptions`
  // here.
  cbListOptions.OnChange := nil;

  try
    // If we're getting notified of a new item being checked...
    if NewState = cbChecked then
    begin
      // Iterate through the items, unchecking all that aren't
      // at the index that just became checked.
      // I wouldn't use `for..in`, because the ordering works better here
      for i := 0 to cbListOptions.Items.Count - 1 do
        if i <> Index then
          cbListOptions.Items[i].Checked := False;
    end;        
  finally
    // Reconnect the event
    cbListOptions.OnChange := cbListOptionsChange;
  end;
end;

To make sure it's clear, I think this is a very bad idea, and if you were working for me I'd not allow it. It's simply wrong to do something so opposed to the expected Windows behavior when there's a proper option available, IMO.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it will, thanks for the reply. I have tried this but it will constantly blink On and Off and eventually trigger a Stack Overflow Error. Any more ideas or a way to over come this problem? thanks. –  Se7en Jun 5 '12 at 19:25
    
:-) You must have caught it just before I deleted it to re-write before actually posting. Try this answer instead. –  Ken White Jun 5 '12 at 20:08
    
=) Yea bad timing lol. If i click CheckBox1 then click it again then CheckBox2 becomes checked and CheckBox1 is Unchecked. Clicking CheckBox2 just works normally(Click - On ~ Off). I want it so if i click CheckBox1 in my list of group boxes then that will become Checked others will be Unchecked, if i click CheckBox2 then that will become checked and CheckBox1 will become Unchecked. Thanks for the help though appreciate it. Sounds / should be so simple to do this not sure why it is so hard. Thanks for the information on my other question. –  Se7en Jun 5 '12 at 20:28
1  
You mean you want all others to become unchecked if you check one of them? Then you want a TRadioGroup instead, as I said in my last paragraph. It's for lists where one item is mutually exclusive (if 1 is selected, all others become unselected). It's designed to implement exactly the behavior you're looking for, and it's what users expect when this behavior is expected. –  Ken White Jun 5 '12 at 20:48
    
Yep, but i would really like to use a CheckBox instead of the RadioGroup ones sureley there has to be a way todo it lol. Can i not jusy decend from another component and build my own? if you can't do it how it works currently. –  Se7en Jun 5 '12 at 22:04

This example uses three TCheckbox controls.

Drop three TCheckbox controls onto a form. For this example, I've named them

cbOpenorders, cbClosedorders and cbAllorders

Add an event to the cbOpenorders.Onclick property in the object inspector.

Then, set the OnClick event properties of cbClosedorders and cbAllorders to this cbOpenorders event. All three boxes will call the same event handler which reduces the amount of code required.

procedure TFrmPreorderViewDialog.cbOpenOrdersClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if TCheckbox(Sender).Checked then
  begin
    cbOpenorders.Checked   := (TCheckbox(Sender) = cbOpenorders);
    cbClosedorders.checked := (TCheckbox(Sender) = cbClosedorders);
    cbAllorders.checked    := (TCheckbox(Sender) = cbAllorders);
  End;
end;

In this example, the user would have the limited ability to check one box, or no boxes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.