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Problem Statement is-

In this case inclusion is null, and exclusion has some values, So I need to check whether temp is there in exclusion, if temp is there in exclusion then don't do anything or you can just get out of the loop, but suppose temp is not there in exclusion then call some method. I implemented the same feature below not sure whether we can improve this more or not. As it looks to me we can improve this more without using any boolean stuff I guess. As the stuff in main needs to be in a method and it is going to be called lot of times

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String temp = "77"; // It can also be 0
    String inclusion = null;
    String exclusion = "100;77;71";
    boolean bb = false;

    if(inclusion !=null) {
        System.out.println("Site Inclusion is not null");
    } else {
        for (String exc: exclusion.split(";")) {
            if(exc.equals(temp)) {
                bb =true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(!bb) {
            // Call some method
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why are you using a String for exclusion as opposed to docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/HashSet.html? –  Noel Yap Jun 5 '12 at 18:59
    
You say that this will be called lots of times. What will be changing--temp, exclusion, or both? If exclusion doesn't vary, then this can be sped up a lot by preprocessing. –  Ted Hopp Jun 5 '12 at 19:07
    
temp, exclusion both can be changed anytime. –  Webby Jun 5 '12 at 19:10

6 Answers 6

I'd suggest using StringTokenizer instead of String.split(). As discussed in this thread, it is quite a bit faster.

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String temp = "77"; // It can also be 0
    String inclusion = null;
    String exclusion = "100;77;71";
    boolean bb = false;

    if(inclusion !=null) {
        System.out.println("Site Inclusion is not null");
    } else {
        StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(exclusion, ";");
        while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {
            if (temp.equals(st.nextToken())) {
                bb = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(!bb) {
            // Call some method
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although in Java documentation appears like a legacy class, StringTokeniker is very fast. –  Paul Vargas Jun 5 '12 at 19:06
    
So according to you boolean bb = true is necessary to achieve my problem scenario? –  Webby Jun 5 '12 at 19:06
1  
@user1419563 - A flag like that is pretty common. There's nothing inefficient about it. (However, I'd move the declaration of bb inside the else branch and rename it to matchFound or something else meaningful.) –  Ted Hopp Jun 5 '12 at 19:09
    
@PaulVargas - It is indeed an ancient class and the docs "discourage" its use (for readability reasons, it seems). However, it's not deprecated and according to the linked article in that other thread I referenced, can be twice as fast as String.split() (even for pre-compiled patterns). The real question is whether OP's exclusion string is a constant, in which case preprocessing of a different kind can avoid repeated string splitting and matching entirely. –  Ted Hopp Jun 5 '12 at 19:16
    
temp, exclusion both can be changed anytime –  Webby Jun 5 '12 at 19:40

The most efficient implementation I can think of is something like

for(int i = exclusion.indexOf(temp);
    i != -1;
    i = exclusion.indexOf(temp, i + 1)) {
  // check if it's bracketed by ; or by the end of the string
  boolean goodStart = i == 0 || exclusion.charAt(i - 1) == ';';
  boolean goodEnd = i + temp.length() == exclusion.length()
    || exclusion.charAt(i + temp.length()) == ';';
  if (goodStart && goodEnd) {
    bb = true;
    break;
  }
}

which avoids the overhead of regexes, uses the built-in String.indexOf, and uses only constant extra variables.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 It is quite efficient. Approximately as fast as just a single indexOf. In the same timing test as mentioned in my answer, this took .07 seconds. –  hatchet Jun 6 '12 at 15:36
    exclusion = ";"+exclusion+";";
    temp = ";"+temp+";";

    bb = exclusion.indexOf(temp) >= 0;
    if(!bb) {
        // Call some method
    }

the first two lines only needed if you have no control of the format of exclusion and temp that's passed in. A quick test with many iterations of the code in your question took 1.74 seconds, and the same test with the code above took 0.38 seconds if exclusion and temp have the leading and trailing semicolon concatenated with every iteration of the timing loop. If they already have the leading and trailing semicolons, the time goes down to .07 seconds. For comparison, matches (regex) takes 1.18 seconds, and the StringTokenizer solution takes 0.50 seconds.

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bExists = Arrays.asList(exclusion.split(";")).contains(temp)
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1  
There's no way that this has better performance than OP's original code. –  Ted Hopp Jun 5 '12 at 19:19

Searching a String by whatever means is O(N). Searching a HashSet is O(1).

Use a HashSet.

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Hard to say, based on your limited post. If they are always ints, and the exclusion list doesn't change that often. Doing the conversion to a collection of ints, and caching would be a good start. A sorted collection, or hashed collection for fast look up with contains might be worthwhile, if the list can have a few more members than three.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay what's the crack? Bad enough voting down someone with out saying why. Almost everybody who's answered. That's just plain stupid. –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 5 '12 at 19:17
    
Should have kept my big gob shut huh? Only me now. Boo hoo. –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 5 '12 at 19:29

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