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I want to clear the git log files so that the command git log returns nothing. Is this possible? Is this recommended?

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1  
Why is destroying your history a desired outcome? – wadesworld Jun 5 '12 at 19:26
1  
The log is kind of the whole point to revision control. – lanzz Jun 5 '12 at 19:28
    
Do you want to remove all your commits or do you want just remove the commit messages? – Fatih Arslan Jun 5 '12 at 21:12
    
The way you do this if rm -rf .git, git init, git add --all – dead Sep 20 '13 at 19:05
      ______________________________    . \  | / .
     /                            / \     \ \ / /
    |                            | ==========  - -    WARNING!
     \____________________________\_/     / / \ \
  ______________________________      \  | / | \      THIS WILL DESTROY
 /                            / \     \ \ / /.   .    YOUR REPOSITORY!
|                            | ==========  - -
 \____________________________\_/     / / \ \    /
      ______________________________   / |\  | /  .
     /                            / \     \ \ / /
    |                            | ==========  -  - -
     \____________________________\_/     / / \ \
                                        .  / | \  .

git log displays the change history of your project. If you really want to discard all of that history, you could...

rm -rf .git
git init

...but there are a relatively small number of situations where that really makes sense.

There aren't any "git log files" that git uses to produce this output; it is iterating over the database of objects that form the history of your project. If you delete the .git directory like this, there's no going back:

  • You will not be able to retrieve previous versions of files from the repository;
  • You will not be able to see how files have changed over time;
  • You will not be able to restore a file you have accidentally deleted.
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You should probably make it clearer at the beginning that this will completely destroy the git repository (i.e. a bold text warning or something). – vergenzt Jun 5 '12 at 19:59
14  
Okay...how's that? – larsks Jun 5 '12 at 20:06
1  
That should be clear enough. Maybe. You never know. :P – vergenzt Jun 5 '12 at 20:10
    
May be he wants to get rid of comments only? Removing .git is not a solution, there could be multiple branches, remotes, etc.. Your soluion destroys all of them. – Fatih Arslan Jun 5 '12 at 21:05
3  
Well, yes, and hopefully that's abundantly clear. Or did you miss the warning? – larsks Jun 5 '12 at 21:06

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