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This so confusing me ,What is the difference between the echo and return, in functions

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closed as not a real question by Sarfraz, Chris, webbiedave, rdlowrey, netcoder Jun 5 '12 at 19:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
php.net/manual/en/functions.returning-values.php ... do you understand the purpose of a function? – Felix Kling Jun 5 '12 at 19:32
3  
Every language has an equivalent of the two. Think in terms of any other language you know. echo prints, return returns – xbonez Jun 5 '12 at 19:32
3  
OMG what a question from someone named PHP! – anubhava Jun 5 '12 at 19:34
    
@anubhava - LOL! Didn't even notice that! – Jim Jun 5 '12 at 19:35
3  
The question demonstrates a fundamental lack of knowledge of programming, whether PHP or otherwise. echo and return are utterly different in what they do. Answers to this question here are not going to be sufficient to teach the basics of programming that are required to give the understanding that is missing here. – Spudley Jun 5 '12 at 19:48
up vote 13 down vote accepted

echo outputs content to the console or the web browser.

Example:

echo "Hey, this is now showing up on your screen!";

return returns a value at the end of a function or method.

Example:

function my_function()
{
    return "Always returns this";
}

echo my_function(); // displays "Always returns this"
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then this also works... without return <?php function my_function() { echo "Always returns this"; } my_function(); ?> – PHP Jun 5 '12 at 19:38
    
Yes, that would produce the same output as my second example above. – Deltik Jun 5 '12 at 19:39
    
Then what is the unique difference between them? – PHP Jun 5 '12 at 19:58
4  
My goodness, I can help you no further. Please... actually take the time to read and comprehend the other answers. – Deltik Jun 5 '12 at 20:18

Ah...

There's a HUGE difference.

In basic:

  • return $a returns a value from the function or ends the function
  • echo $a outputs a value

    function foo() {
        return 5;
    }
    
    $x = foo(); // $x holds the value 5
    
    echo $x; // outputs "5"
    
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echo - Output one or more strings

return - If called from within a function, the return statement immediately ends execution of the current function, and returns its argument as the value of the function call. return will also end the execution of an eval() statement or script file.

Take your time and read php manual instead.

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Echo prints strings to the screen or the browser. Return ends the function, optionally sending a value back from the function to the code that called the function.

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effectively it ends the function but it also returns a specified value from the function – Crayon Violent Jun 5 '12 at 19:32
1  
not neccessarly. You could do a function foo() {return;} which is basically a void function. – Johannes Klauß Jun 5 '12 at 19:35

Echo allows you to send a value to the browser, for display to the user.

Return allows you to end a function, as well as pass off a value to another function or variable.

Check out this link, which goes into more detail:

http://blog.bluefur.com/2009/01/20/php-echo-return/

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check this example ,you will get an idea, function salestax($price,$tax=.0575) { $total = $price + ($price * $tax); return $total; } – Ballu Rocks Jun 5 '12 at 19:47

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