Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having speed issue generating documentation in C#.

I am basically trying to create documents with 600+ pages. But the tools I have used handle this very slowly.

I first tried using DocX by Novacode. Creation of this document with 600+ pages takes upwards to 3 minutes. I learned that there could be an issue with the function "InsertDocument" so I tried to find a different solution.

I started looking into opening a HTML document into word. While this is a fast solution, images are not embedded into the document. The HTML syntax (src="data:image/png;base64,xxxx") is not supported in MS Word.

I could use URLs to the images, but then if the internet connection is down, the images would not display.

I then started looking into a HTML->PDF solution. iTextSharp is a little faster than the DocX solution, but still takes 1-2 minutes to generate this document.

I am simply out of ideas. I'm not sure a commercial product would be better, and I don't want to shell out that kind of cash, to just have the same speed issue.

Has anyone had experience with creating Word/PDF documents with 600+ pages in C# that is fairly quick (1-5 seconds).

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
it's not clear from your question what the real goal is. E.g. using HTML will give you a file with embedded images, but you say it won't open in Word. So does the output have to be Word-compatible? In any case, the next logical thing to try is RTF. –  MK. Jun 5 '12 at 19:54
    
The output PDF is almost 6MB. But, its not a download speed issue. It's the generation of the document, before the download begins. –  tcarter2005 Jun 5 '12 at 19:56
1  
Most commercial solutions have either a trial or a money back guarantee. –  banging Jun 5 '12 at 19:57
1  
Yeah, so try RTF. It's easy to generate and obviously opens in Word. I'm not sure how well Word handles embedded images but there is a good chance that it does. –  MK. Jun 5 '12 at 20:09
3  
Can you outline why speed is critical here? Perhaps it's because you want to generate the document in a web request? If so, consider doing it in an offline process, and making it available to the user (web interface, send by email) when it is cooked. –  halfer Jun 6 '12 at 8:53

1 Answer 1

If you are trying to do this from a web server, you should be careful about resources consumption of this process, since you may run out of memory for example quite easily.

If at some point you decide to consider commercial libraries, maybe you could give Amyuni PDF Creator .Net a try. Amyuni PDF Creator .Net provides a "page by page" mode that saves resources when processing exceptionally long PDF documents. The idea is to save each page to the output file as soon as it is generated, maybe keeping a few pages in memory in case they need to be modified.

Take a look on these links for more details:

usual disclaimer applies

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.