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When a client application requests for a new object, I let the Factory class create that new object for me.

public class CarFactory{

    public Car CreateCar()
    {
       //create a new car object and send back  
    }
}

The properties of the car object are populated by calling stored procedures which are stored in the database. In the database, we store the default values which can change eachday. The default tables are populated by external systems.

public class Car {
  public List<string> DefaultTyres {get;set;}
  public List<string> DefaultPetrolSpec {get;set;} 
}

So when the factory (which the service layer calls) creates the Car object, the factory class calls the repository class that then calls the DB to populate Car's properties...but the relation of these layers sounds a bit strange...

public Car CreateCar()
{
    //create a new car object and send back
    //Call CarRepository.GetDefaultTyres(), CarRepository.GetDefaultPetrolSpec() etc.  
}

Because I think my factory implementation is doing a lot. May be it shouldn't call the repository layers (which then call the DB to get the data for the car object).

What do you guys think? Should Factory classes communicate with DB? Is it ok if they do? if not then whose responsibilities should it be?

share|improve this question
1  
Is there any reason this post is tagged under "C#" and "Java" and ".net"? – Alex Lockwood Jun 5 '12 at 21:07
1  
@AlexLockwood As much as I personally prefer the spelling "Tires", "Tyers" is correct for British English... – Beska Jun 5 '12 at 21:08
    
Thanks Alex. Beska is correct. Alex, mainly because I wanted to get OOP guy's attention and I am using Java app and C# guys have similar background I guess :) – InfoLearner Jun 5 '12 at 21:11
    
I deleted my previous comment. Thanks for letting me know about that... I'm not from the UK, so that's my excuse :P. – Alex Lockwood Jun 5 '12 at 21:13
    
No worries, I guess... I just find it funny that you decided to tag your post under three different languages but didn't tag it under either "design-patterns" or "factory-pattern" :) – Alex Lockwood Jun 5 '12 at 21:14

The answer depends on whether there could be multiple (implementations of) repositories or multiple databases/other data stores involved. If the answer to the above is yes (even if it is just an anticipated need/possibility at this point), it is better to have a repository layer to insulate the Factory class from the above mentioned changes when/if those changes happen.

Think of it differently: it is the responsibility of the factory class to know how to create cars; it is not its responsibility to know what DB to connect to/when/how. It is usually better to kepp responsibilities simple to facilitiate change and modular design

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One thing I've learned over time is that there may be 5 answers to your question. And, all of them would be right. The real question is: is what you are doing make sense? If your factory is on the server and the connection to the database is closest there, then that is where the calls should be.

Now I'd sometimes ask myself the same questions as well as others. For example, should the factory create the tyres and the Petrol for the car when creating the car, or should the car be the one to know how to create itself.

So you may want to consider this: if you have a vast array of objects that your factory is creating (which is usually why you have a factory pattern) then it may make sense that all of your elements have a base class / interface that exposes a Create method. (I'm posting a very quick and dirty example, doing reflection to create the type could keep the factory even more generic)

Example:

   public interface FactoryObject
   {
          void Create();
          void Destroy();
   }

   public class Car:FactoryObject
   {
        public void Create()
        {
             //TODO: Create my tyres and my petrol
             //TODO: Create my fenders and body
        }
   }

   public class Bicycle:FactoryObject
   {
        public void Create()
        {
             //TODO: Create my tyres but I do not need petrol
             //TODO: Create my fenders but I have no body
        }
   }

   public class Factory
   {
        public FactoryObject GetFactoryObject(Type type)
        {
             FactoryObject returnedObject = null;
             if ( type is Car ) returnedObject = new Car();
             elseif (type is Bicycle) returnedObject = new Bicycle();
             if (returnedObject != null)
                  returnedObject.Create();
             return returnedObject;
        }       
   }

In this fashion your factory knows to create a FactoryObject, however it has no bound knowledge of HOW to build that object. More importantly it doesn't care.

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If you have an additional class that handles the actual DB connection, I think it's fine. What I mean by such a class is one that performs the actual connection, handles some connection/query exceptions etc. The Factory class should not know DB-related stuff, it should delegate that to another class/object.

This abstraction layer to the DB can as well be a whole hierarchical tree of classes, not just a single class. Something like this:

enter image description here

Each of those subclasses knows how to handle a connection to that specific RDBMS.

PS: Note that this is just an example, you may not have to do it like this. Also, having such a hierarchy can complicate things a little, because it is possible that you need a Factory for these classes as well.

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