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It seems like the C# compiler infers types differently depending on how a method is called:

void Foo<T>() where T : Bar
{
   var instance = new T()
   {
      ID = 1
   }.
   ExtensionMethod();
}

In this case the compiler seems to infer that the type of instance is Bar, because I have a class Bar where ExtensionMethod is declared.

void Foo<T>() where T : Bar
{
   var instance = new T()
   {
      ID = 1
   };
   instance.ExtensionMethod();
}

In this case the compiler infers that the type of instance is T, which is what I would expect it to do in the first case as well. Why is there such a difference?

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The . operator has very high precedence, and the assignment operator = has a very low one. See spec. Therefore, in your first example, instance is set to all of ( new T() { ID = 1}.ExtensionMethod() ). It's like the difference between var inst = (A.B); and (var inst = A).B; –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 5 '12 at 21:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the first case, you assign the result of the method call to instance. In the second case you discard the call's result. Instead, you assign the new T This is the only difference.

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According to the var keyword definition in Implicitly Typed Local Variables :

The var keyword instructs the compiler to infer the type of the variable from the expression on the right side of the initialization statement

On the right side of the var,in your case, there is not only the ctor part, but also a function call, which returns void. So it turns out in infering the type assignable to var from void returned by the function call. This leads to a compiler signal about a fact:

Cannot assign void to an implicitly-typed local variable

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