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I have this dataset. I want to update the MySQL table. I can do it in the current form but I thought a conversion to dictionary will shrink the list to be updated.

My dataset :

dataset = [('121', set(['NY'])), ('132', set(['CA', 'NY'])), ('198', set(['NY'])), ('676', set(['NY'])), ('89', set(['NY', 'CA']))]

Desired output :

A dictionary :

output = {'set(['NY'])':121,198,676, 'set(['CA', 'NY'])':132,89}
share|improve this question
2  
Do you want the sets to be keys or do you want a string representation of the set to be the key? – Trevor Jun 5 '12 at 22:18
    
String rep to be the key. – ThinkCode Jun 5 '12 at 22:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You must use a frozenset for the key. There is no guarantee that a set with the same elements will always be turned into the same repr or tuple as sets are unordered. Unless you sort the set elements first of course, but that seems wasteful

from collections import defaultdict

dataset = [('121', set(['NY'])), ('132', set(['CA', 'NY'])), ('198', set(['NY'])), ('676', set(['NY'])), ('89', set(['NY', 'CA']))]
output = defaultdict(list)
for value, key in dataset:
    output[frozenset(key)].append(value)

or using a sorted tuple

from collections import defaultdict

dataset = [('121', set(['NY'])), ('132', set(['CA', 'NY'])), ('198', set(['NY'])), ('676', set(['NY'])), ('89', set(['NY', 'CA']))]
output = defaultdict(list)
for value, key in dataset:
    output[tuple(sorted(key))].append(value)

Random example to illustrate this

>>> s,t = set([736, 9753, 7126, 7907, 3350]), set([3350, 7907, 7126, 9753, 736])
>>> s == t
True
>>> tuple(s) == tuple(t)
False
>>> frozenset(s) == frozenset(t)
True
>>> hash(tuple(s)) == hash(tuple(t))
False
>>> hash(frozenset(s)) == hash(frozenset(t))
True
share|improve this answer

I don't think you can have a set as a dictionary key, so maybe a tuple?

from collections import defaultdict

dataset = [('121', set(['NY'])), ('132', set(['CA', 'NY'])), ('198', set(['NY'])), ('676', set(['NY'])), ('89', set(['NY', 'CA']))]
output = defaultdict(list)
for value, key in dataset:
    output[tuple(key)].append(value)
    # or output[str(key)].append(value) if you want a string as the key
share|improve this answer
2  
You can if you use a frozenset – jamylak Jun 5 '12 at 22:24
1  
@jamylak, frozenset for sure as sets are unordered – John La Rooy Jun 5 '12 at 22:46

Try this:

dataset = [('121', set(['NY'])), ('132', set(['CA', 'NY'])), ('198', set(['NY'])), ('676', set(['NY'])), ('89', set(['NY', 'CA']))]
from collections import defaultdict
d = defaultdict(list)

for val, key in dataset:
    d[repr(key)].append(int(val))

d
> {"set(['NY', 'CA'])": [132, 89], "set(['NY'])": [121, 198, 676]}
share|improve this answer
1  
This works too! Thank you. – ThinkCode Jun 5 '12 at 22:25

Here is an alternative to defaultdict:

dataset = [('121', set(['NY'])), ('132', set(['CA', 'NY'])), ('198', set(['NY'])), ('676', set(['NY'])), ('89', set(['NY', 'CA']))]    

output = {}
for value, key in dataset:
   output.setdefault(frozenset(key), []).append(value)

Result:

>>> output
{frozenset(['NY', 'CA']): ['132', '89'], frozenset(['NY']): ['121', '198', '676']}

I prefer using setdefault() over defaultdict here because of the following behavior:

>>> output = defaultdict(list, {frozenset(['NY', 'CA']): ['132', '89'], frozenset(['NY']): ['121', '198', '676']})
>>> output[frozenset(['FL'])]    # instead of a key error, this modifies output
[]
>>> output
defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {frozenset(['NY', 'CA']): ['132', '89'], frozenset(['FL']): [], frozenset(['NY']): ['121', '198', '676']})
share|improve this answer

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